Mustafa I. Hussain, Ph.D.

  • Postdoctoral Fellow, Medical Informatics and Clinical Epidemiology, School of Medicine

Biography

Mustafa I. Hussain, Ph.D., is a postdoctoral fellow at the OHSU School of Medicine Department of Medical Informatics and Clinical Epidemiology (DMICE), where he studies conflict between law enforcement and the clinical establishment over problem opioid use, and the effects of partial drug decriminalization in Oregon. 

His work follows in the tradition of science and technology studies (STS), a branch of the social sciences that focuses on the social construction of science and technology. His reading list currently includes selections such as Andrew Abbott’s study of inter-professional conflict, Diana Forsythe’s work at the intersection of STS and medical informatics, Susan Leigh Star and Geoffrey Bowker’s work in elucidating the human values and pragmatic concerns involved in the International Classification of Diseases (ICD), and Nancy Campbell’s work in the history and politics of opioids and Narcan in the United States. He is interested broadly in social medicine, such as the work of Howard Waitzkin and Bonnie Leftkowitz, as well as studies of the production of medical futures such as those by Mei Zhan and Kaushik Sunder Rajan.

Dr. Hussain’s research involves using archival and ethnographic work to contextualize present drug reforms. He believes the research could lead to better national drug policy. He joined OHSU in 2021 after earning a Ph.D. in Informatics at the University of California Irvine’s Health and Information (HAI) Lab, where he conducted research on clinical decision support (CDS) and the California prescription drug monitoring program (PDMP) in terms of usability, policy, and organizational life.

Education

  • B.S., 2014, University of Utah
  • M.S., 2016, Florida Polytechnic University
  • Ph.D., 2021, University of California, Irvine

Areas of interest

  • Critical health informatics, science and technology studies (STS), inter-professional conflict over drug control

Publications

Selected publications

  • Please see Curriculum Vitae (PDF) link in "Additional Information"
  • Hussain MI, Bowker G. “Phenotyping as disciplinary practice: data infrastructure and the interprofessional conflict over drug use in California.” Big Data & Society. 2021 Jul 1;8(2):. DOI: 10.1177/20539517211031258
  • Molldrem S, Hussain MI, Smith AKJ. Open science, COVID-19, and the news: Exploring controversies in the circulation of early SARS-CoV-2 genomic epidemiology research. Glob Public Health. 2021 Mar 4:1-14. PMID: 33661076.
  • Hussain MI, Figueiredo MC, Tran BD, Su Z, Molldrem S, Eikey EV, Chen Y. A scoping review of qualitative research in JAMIA: past contributions and opportunities for future work. Special Issue on Continuing the Legacy of Diana Forsythe’s Work at the Intersection of Informatics and the Social Sciences, Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association (JAMIA) 2021 Feb 15;28(2):402-413. PMID: 33225361
  • Molldrem S, Hussain MI, McClelland A. Alternatives to sharing COVID-19 data with police agencies: policy recommendations and guidance for international stakeholders following developments in the U.S. and Canada. Health Policy; 2021 Feb;125(2):135-140. PMID: 33390280
  • Hussain MI, Nelson AM, Yeung BG, Sukumar L, Zheng K. How the presentation of patient information and decision-support advisories influences opioid prescribing behavior: a simulation study. JAMIA 2020;27(4):613–20. PMID: 32016407
  • Hussain MI, Reynolds T, Zheng K. Medication safety alert fatigue may be reduced via interaction design and clinical role-tailoring: A systematic review. JAMIA. 2019; 26(10):1141-1149. PMID: 31206159
  • Hussain MI, Nelson A, Polston G, Zheng K. Improving the design of California’s Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP). JAMIA Open. 2019;2(1):160–72. PMID: 31984351
  • Hussain MI, Dewey J, Weibel N. Reducing alarm fatigue: Exploring decision structures, risks, and design. EAI Endorsed Transactions on Pervasive Health and Technology. 2017; 17(10), 1–14. Springer London. DOI: 10.4108/eai.13-7-2017.152886

Publications

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