Christina L. LancioniM.D.

  • Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Division of Infectious Diseases, School of Medicine

Expertise

  • Pediatrics

Special focus on

  • Infectious Disease (Pediatric)

I see patients at

Insurance

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Biography

Dr. Lancioni leads a diverse portfolio of international collaborative research projects focusing on how age, infectious pathogens, and environmental influences including nutrition and substance-use disorders, impact an individual’s vulnerability to severe infectious diseases, immune function, and exposure to chronic systemic inflammation. Working with Addiction Medicine specialists at OHSU, Dr. Lancioni is defining the specific mechanisms that alter immune function among people living with HIV who suffer from opioid- and alcohol-use disorders in an effort to optimize treatment strategies that improve immune dysregulation in this vulnerable population.  In her international research program based in Uganda, Dr. Lancioni is leading a study with colleagues at the Ugandan-Case-Western-Research-Collaboration, that focuses on understanding how the immune system of young children responds to infection with Mycobacterium Tuberculosis, the bacteria that cases TB disease. She aims to understand why young children develop severe forms of TB disease, and how to better diagnosis and prevent TB in children. Dr. Lancioni is also an active member of the Childhood Acute Illness & Nutrition (CHAIN) Network, where investigators from nine sites in Sub-Saharan Africa and SE Asia, are working to understand the biologic and social mechanisms that contribute to high mortality rates from common infectious diseases among young children living in low- and middle-income countries.

Education

  • M.D., 2001, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
  • Residency:

    • Pediatrics, Children’s National Medical Center, 2004
  • Fellowship:

    • Pediatric infectious disease, Rainbow Babies and Children’s Hospital, 2009
  • Certifications:

    • American Board of Pediatrics, 2004

Languages

  • English

Memberships and associations

  • American Academy of Pediatrics
  • Pediatric Infectious Disease Society of America
  • American Thoracic Society
  • Society for Pediatric Research