Teachers of MD Students

MD Program Tracy Bumsted, MD, MPH, FAAP, Associate Dean, Undergraduate Medical Education

Welcome to Educators

Each year OHSU faculty, alumni, and community healthcare providers give of their time and talent to educate the next generation of physicians. We are grateful for this contribution and the many opportunities this important relationship provides for our students. 

On this page, there are resources to help you decide if working with students is right for you, as well as resources for those who are actively working with students. 

Tracy Bumsted, M.D., M.P.H., F.A.A.P.
Associate Dean, Undergraduate Medical Education

Admissions

Help us assess future physicians. The OHSU School of Medicine Admissions Office is looking for volunteers to become raters of MD Program applicants in the multiple mini interview (MMI).

Volunteers should be physicians (practicing or retired), clinicians, nurses, scientists or others with a connection to health care and a strong interest in contributing to identifying future physicians. Experience in evaluations or testing situations would be ideal, but not essential.

The MMI is a series of short interviews with standardized scenarios and questions. These short interviews require the applicant to respond to a prompt that is often health-related, then to discuss this with an interviewer or rater.  Some scenarios have an applicant interact with a standardized confederate while a rater observes; yet other scenarios have an applicant complete a structured task with verbal instructions.  

Commitment and training

Because the MMI is so different than a traditional interview, every rater is required to attend a 90-minute training session prior to participation. Typically, the training sessions are in August or September. 

Volunteers must commit to a minimum of four sessions of rating the medical school applicants between September and March. Volunteers can select the days that work best for them. Each session is three hours long and usually on a Wednesday or Friday morning. Volunteers need to be present for the entire session. The scoring is completed during the session and there is no preparation required ahead of time.

For additional information or to volunteer, please contact Katy Guertin-Davis at guertink@ohsu.edu

Foundations of Medicine inlcuding Preceptorship and Clinical Skills Lab

Preceptorship

Becoming a preceptor is a rewarding way to enrich the learning experience for first- and second-year medical students. The School of Medicine asks physicians and advanced practice providers (M.D., D.O., N.P. or P.A.) to allow students in their clinic for four hours, one half-day a week. This is a student's first foray into a clinical setting – a formative and memorable experience. Students interact with patients and learn to become part of a health care team. Preceptors demonstrate how to start thinking like student-doctors, which includes developing communication skills, both with faculty and patients. The school depends on preceptors for this important experience; thank you for your generosity and expertise.

For additional information or to volunteer, please contact Matthew Rempes at rempes@ohsu.edu

Clinical Skills Lab

Becoming a small group facilitator in the Clinical Skills Labs is a fulfilling way to contribute to the learning experience for first- and second-year medical students. The School of Medicine asks physicians and advanced practice providers (M.D., D.O., N.P. or P.A.) to facilitate groups of 10-14 students one afternoon per week (currently Monday and Tuesday afternoons Aug-Dec and Tuesday afternoons Jan-July).  Two areas of content are covered during these small group sessions and facilitators have the option of teaching one or both content areas – the Clinical Context (CC) content has a focus on communication skills and discussion of contextual issues such as health policy, professionalism, ethics, informatics, epidemiology, quality, safety, and social determinants of health. The Clinical Assessment and Management (CAM) covers physical examination skills, patient interviewing, diagnostic reasoning, presentations and case discussions. Each session comes with a well-developed and detailed discussion guide.  The school depends on facilitators to provide guidance and professional context for these sessions; thank you for your generosity and expertise. Please contact Kim Regner regner@ohsu.edu for more information or sign-up using electronic Facilitator Sign-Up Form  

Narrative Medicine

The narrative medicine curriculum offers pre-clinical and clinical medical students an opportunity to reflect on the experience of becoming a physician, and to develop skills of narrative competence—the ability to listen, absorb, and be moved to action by the stories of illness. We seek OHSU and community physicians, advanced practice providers, social workers, and educators to skillfully facilitate small group narrative medicine sessions. During Preceptorship and Intersessions, students use reflective writing, non-medical texts, visual art, graphic medicine, or film to consider the experience of illness from multiple perspectives. Narrative medicine provides an opportunity to look beyond a disease and consider what it means to be human in medicine. Facilitator training is provided by Dr. Elizabeth lahtie@ohsu.edu 

For additional information or to volunteer, please contact Matthew Rempes at rempes@ohsu.edu