Renee Fleming's Music and the Mind

The OHSU Brain Institute is proud to partner with the Oregon Symphony to present Renée Fleming, world-renowned soprano and art advocate, for an evening discussion of music and neuroscience. Following her presentation of Music and the Mind, Ms. Fleming will be joined by Marc Freeman, Ph.D., director of the Vollum Institute, Larry Sherman, Ph.D., senior scientist at the Oregon National Primate Research Center at OHSU and musician, and Erick Gallun, Ph.D., associate professor in OHSU's department of Otolaryngology for a conversation with our Portland Community.

Friday, September 21, 6 p.m.

OHSU Auditorium, Marquam Hill

Advance tickets are not required, although RSVP is requested to Kate Stout. Seating is first-come-first-served. See OHSU Transportation and Parking for travel information. Parking permits and hourly payment are not required after 5 p.m. Please do not park in any spaces noted as reserved 24/7.

Renée Fleming

Renee Fleming Headshot

Renée Fleming's Music and the Mind presentation explores the power of music as it relates to health, including childhood development, music therapy and discoveries that are changing our understanding of the brain. Ms. Fleming's presentation is inspired by the Sound Health initiative, which she spearheaded as part of her role as Artistic Advisory to the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. The initiative, established in partnership with the National Institutes of Health and in association with the National Endowment for the Arts, explores and brings attention to research and practice at the intersection of music, health and neuroscience.

Throughout Ms. Fleming's journey as an artist, she has been struck by music's power to heal and transform lives. "Today we are riding a wave of scientific discovery in music and neuroscience, and I'm fascinated by the breadth of the research being conducted. Beyond its ability to enthrall and entertain, music can offer a host of health benefits - from childhood development to therapeutic applications for Alzheimer's disease, autism, PTSD, Parkinson's disease and chronic pain," said Ms. Fleming. "And close to my heart, singing can retrain the brain to use different neural circuitry, helping those who have sustained a traumatic brain injury or suffered a stroke regain the ability to speak."

Renee Fleming in ballgown

See Renée Fleming in Concert
One Night Only!
September 23, 2018, 7:30 p.m.
Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall

America's favorite soprano, also known as "the People's Diva," returns to Portland to showcase her legendary voice and spell binding artistry alongside Music Director Carlos Kalmar and the Oregon Symphony, in a program that features her extraordinary range, from Strauss to Sondheim to Sting.

Order now for best seats and prices. Tickets at orsymphony.org.