Summer Internships

The application process

The application portal for the Occupational Health Sciences' 2019 Summer Student Research Awards has closed. Please check back here to apply for the Occupational Health Sciences' 2020 Summer Student Research Awards in December 2019.

2019 Summer internship program details

Occupational Health Sciences' Summer Student Research Awards are three-month paid summer internships designed to introduce undergraduate students to biomedical and occupational health research. To be eligible for an Institute funded award, students must be Oregon residents or attend college in Oregon. Students at all undergraduate levels may apply. 

The Oregon Institute of Occupational Health Sciences provides unique research opportunities across a range of basic and applied research areas. Whether studying molecules, cells, organ systems, non-human organisms, or out gathering data in the community, student award winners will gain valuable experience conducting a specific project aligned with their host faculty member's research program. 

OccHealthSci Summer Intern Group 2019
Front (L to R) Connor Onitsuka, Hendrix College, Doris Kretzschmar lab; Joanne Tran, University of Portland, Xiaoquan Rao lab; Marykathryn Kordash, University of Portland, Andrew McHill lab; Sarah Bonomo, Oregon State University, David A. Hurtado lab; Grace Mockaitis, Lewis and Clark College, Charles Allen lab; Katelyn Gutowsky, Reed College, Miranda Lim lab; Naoto Tozaki, Portland State University, R. Stephen Lloyd lab

Back (L to R) Alexander Watt, Oregon State University, Matt Butler lab; Jacob Gruber, University of Portland, Saurabh Thosar lab; Timothy Oxendahl, Portland State University, Leslie Hammer lab; Martina Shannon, Western Oregon University, Nichole Bowles lab; Rachel Cohen, Oregon State University, Brad Wipfli lab; Not shown: Carolina Pena-Navarro, University of Portland, Steven A. Shea Lab

2019 Poster Session

Our 2019 student interns presented their findings in a scientific poster session on August 14 among OHSU faculty and staff, and families and friends. We congratulate them on their fine work! Here is a recap of their projects:

  • Sarah Bonomo, Oregon State University, David A. Hurtado Lab, Workplace Aggression and Compassion Satisfaction among Patient-Care Workers in Public Clinics
  • Rachel Cohen, Oregon State University, Brad Wipfli Lab, Supervisors, Stress, and Sedentary Behavior
  • Jacob Gruber, University of Portland, Saurabh Thosar Lab, Effects of Obstructive Sleep Apnea on the Circadian Rhythm of Vascular Function
  • Katelyn Gutowsky, Reed College, Miranda Lim Lab, Young adult sleep disruption and its impact on social behavior and activity in prairie voles.
  •  Marykathryn Kordash, University of Portland Andrew McHill Lab, Shiftwork, caloric intake, and blood pressure; Potential mechanisms for escalated cardiovascular risk
  • Grace Mockaitis, Lewis and Clark College, Charles Allen Lab, Manipulation of intracellular calcium signaling in suprachiasmatic nucleus astrocytes reveals possible disruption of circadian rhythms in mice: A preliminary analysis
  • Connor Onitsuka, Hendrix College, Doris Kretzschmar Lab, Pathogenic mechanisms of disease-associated human Tau mutants in D. Melanogaster
  • Timothy Oxendahl, Portland State University, Leslie Hammer Lab, The Effects of Work-Family Conflict on Psychological Distress and Drinking to Cope
  • Carolina Pena-Navarro, University of Portland Steven A. Shea Lab, Circadian variation in physiological stress responses in obstructive sleep apnea versus healthy controls
  • Martina Shannon, Western Oregon University, Nicole Bowles Lab, Effects of Shiftwork on Sleep in Firefighters
  • JJ Terrobias, University of Portland, Mitch Turker Lab, The Effects of Stress on Circadian Rhythms and the Role of Per1
  • Naoto Tozaki. Portland State University, R. Stephen Lloyd Lab, Characterization of Compounds Enhancing OGG1-Catalyzed DNA Repair
  • Joanne Tran, University of Portland, Xiaoquan Rao Lab, The NRF2 pathway is an important regulator of oxidative stress and atherosclerosis progression after PM2.5 exposure
  • Alexander Watt, Oregon State University, Matt Butler Lab, Long Term Health Impacts of Developmental Mis-timed Feeding