Title IX and Sexual Misconduct

At OHSU, we are committed to providing a safe and inclusive space for everyone. The Office of Civil Rights Investigations and Compliance Title IX Coordinator helps ensure we follow Title IX in education programs, activities, employment and admissions.

Learn about Title IX and how to get help if you need it.

What is Title IX?

Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 is a federal civil rights law that prohibits sex discrimination in an education program receiving federal funding. The law protects students and employees from sex and gender discrimination and sexual misconduct. Here’s what the law covers:

  • Sexual violence or partner/relationship violence
  • Sexual harassment
  • Sexual exploitation (including revenge porn, sharing of personal or nude images without consent, and voyeurism)
  • Stalking (physical and media/electronic)
  • Discrimination based on gender, sexual orientation, pregnancy or parenting status

    Learn more about Title IX and related laws

    How to get support

    OHSU has many options for support. If you or another OHSU community member is facing sexual misconduct or gender discrimination, please reach out.

    OCIC Confidential Intake Specialists

    OCIC Confidential Intake Specialists respond to reports of misconduct at OHSU. You can report sexual assault, harassment, domestic violence, dating violence, stalking and discrimination to us. A Confidential Intake Specialists will be in touch to help you with next steps.

      OHSU Title IX Coordinator

      OHSU’s Title IX Coordinator is specially trained to address concerns around Title IX compliance. Please reach out if you have questions.   

      Angela Fleischer, M.S.W., LCSW, CFP-A (she/her/hers)
      Associate Vice President of the Office of Civil Rights Investigations and Compliance, Title IX Coordinator
      titleix@ohsu.edu or 503-494-5148

      Confidential Advocacy Program (CAP)

      CAP advocates offer 24/7 support services to OHSU members impacted by sexual misconduct, discrimination, harassment or retaliation.

        Federal and state resources

        Your legal rights

        People affected by sexual misconduct, harassment, gender discrimination and other crimes have legal rights. 

        The impacted person has the right to:

        • Contact law enforcement.
        • Contact OHSU Public Safety
        • Be treated with respect by university officials.
        • Be free from retaliation.
        • Get information about and take advantage of campus support resources.
        • Have others present during the investigation process.
          • An advisor, lawyer, union representative or Confidential Advocacy Program member can go with you to any proceedings and provide support and advocacy.
        • Decide whether to pursue informal resolution or a formal investigative process.
        • Get information about options to change academic, living, transportation and working situations.
        • Access safe living accommodations and educational and work environments.
        • Get a forensic medical exam free of charge.
        • Receive updates on the sexual assault evidence, including:
          • Any results of a sexual assault evidence kit.
          • Policies governing the kit’s collection and preservation.
          • If the state government and storage system intend to destroy the kit after the statutory limitations period or 20 years have passed; and request in writing to have sexual assault evidence preserved longer.
        • Have the university evaluate and explain the scope of a no contact order.
        • Fully participate in any process, whether you or the university is filing a complaint.
        • Access investigative materials during the investigation and before a decision is made.
        • Know the outcome of any investigation and the reasons for that outcome, in writing.

        Learn more about your rights and what to do if they're violated.

        The responding person has the right to:

        • Be presumed not responsible unless a preponderance of the evidence substantiates a policy violation.
        • A fair and impartial investigation and hearing process.
        • Be treated with respect by university officials.
        • Be free from retaliation.
        • Get information about and take advantage of campus support resources.
        • Have others present during the investigation process.
          • An advisor, lawyer or union representative n go with you to any proceedings and provide support and advocacy.
        • Refuse an informal resolution (however, the Title IX Coordinator may file a formal complaint on behalf of OHSU).
        • Have the university explain the scope of a no contact order.
        • Fully participate in any process, whether another party or the university is filing a complaint.
        • Access investigative materials during the investigation and before a decision is made.
        • Know the outcome of any investigation and the reasons for that outcome, in writing.

        Advocacy and safety resources

        If you or an OHSU colleague has concerns about safety at OHSU, at home or in the community, please explore these options.

        Advocacy and support

        Confidential support

        We are here to support you in cases of sexual assault, harassment, domestic violence, dating violence, stalking and discrimination of any kind. An OCIC Confidential Intake Specialists will be in touch to help you understand next steps.

        Confidential Advocacy Program (CAP)

        Contact Confidential Advocacy Program advocates for support services 24/7. They have resources to help OHSU members impacted by sexual misconduct, discrimination, harassment or retaliation. The program provides training, self-care tools and therapeutic resources.

        Counseling

        Access OHSU counseling services and assistance anytime you need it.

        More resources

        See civil rights policies and resources to learn more about your rights and responsibilities as an OHSU community member.

        Training materials for decision-makers and investigators are available upon request for inspection by members of the public while this website is under construction. 

        Safety planning

        Personal safety assistance

        OHSU members can get trauma-informed personal safety assistance from the OHSU Department of Public Safety. They can help you create a plan to:

        • Increase your safety from harassment, intimidation, abuse, violence (domestic and dating) and stalking.
        • Respond to threats. 

        For assistance, email Sierra Walker, Community Safety Coordinator, at walkersi@ohsu.edu.

        More resources

        See civil rights policies and resources to learn more about your rights and responsibilities as an OHSU member.

        More ways to stay safe:

          Protective orders

          FAPA restraining orders

          The Family Abuse Prevention Act (FAPA) provides restraining orders in cases of domestic violence, harassment, stalking or sexual assault from a family or household member. Restraining orders are designed for those in imminent danger of further abuse. 

          Learn more about applying for, modifying and renewing FAPA restraining orders.

          Stalking orders

          According to the Oregon Department of Justice, stalking refers to “unwanted, obsessive attention directed at a specific person that would reasonably cause them to feel threatened” and afraid for their safety.

          Stalking is a crime. If you are impacted by stalking behavior, you can file a Stalking Protective Order (SPO) in the county where the respondent lives or where the unwanted contact happened. 

          Stalking can take many forms, including:

          • Repeated phone calls, texts, emails or sending unwanted gifts.
          • Following or keeping tabs on where a person goes.
          • Driving by or waiting outside a person’s home, work or school.
          • Damaging a person’s home or property.
          • Threatening harm to a person or their loved one.
          • Searching public records or social media sites or hiring investigators.
          • Going through a person’s personal belongings or garbage.
          • Contacting a person’s friends, family, neighbors or co-workers.

          More resources

            Sexual Assault Protection Order

            A court may issue a Sexual Assault Protection Order (SAPO) when a person was subjected to unwanted sexual abuse by another person who is not a family member or intimate partner. The SAPO was created to fill a gap not covered by the Family Abuse Prevention Act (FAPA), specifically related to sexual assault from acquaintances or other people you know by name but don’t know well.

            OHSU members can contact the Confidential Advocacy Program (CAP) for assistance.

            Learn more about a Sexual Assault Protection Order (SAPO) in the state of Oregon.

            Submit a report to OCIC

            Questions, concerns

            Expectations for OHSU members

            When it comes to discriminatory misconduct: 

            • OHSU employees, except designated confidential employees, must report discriminatory misconduct they hear about to OCIC or to their Human Resources business partner. 
            • Students are not required to report discriminatory misconduct. 
            • All OHSU members are encouraged to report discriminatory misconduct they experience. 
            • See OHSU's Discrimination, Harassment and Retaliation policy for more detail.  

            Unsure if you need to report? Call OCIC at 503-494-5148