Research Programs

Attention, Emotion, and Neurosphysiological Development Lab (ATTEND) - Sarah Karalunas, Ph.D.

The ATTEND lab uses a multi-method approach that combines behavioral ratings, cognitive tests, and physiological measures to understand the basic processes contributing to ADHD. We are especially interested in the unique differences between individuals with ADHD. Our long-term goals are to improve clinical assessment and diagnosis and inform the development of new treatments that directly target the causes of impairment. 

Center for ADHD Research Joel Nigg, Ph.D.

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) affects approximately 5 percent of school-aged children worldwide with boys being twice as likely as girls to develop the disorder. No socioeconomic group, nation or culture is excluded. ADHD is often characterized by symptoms such as inattention and disorganization, impulsivity and hyperactivity, persisting over time and situation that is not consistent with developmental level or age. Since current treatments only suppress symptoms, our program at OHSU seeks to identify better diagnostic tools, discover causes, and inform improved assessment, treatment of prevention.

Developmental Brain Imaging Lab (DBIL) - Bonnie Nagel, Ph.D.

The Developmental Brain Imaging Lab has been studying brain development in healthy and at-risk youth for over a decade. Studying this crucial time in development is necessary to enhance our understanding of changes in the developing brain and ways to prevent and treat such things as substance abuse and mood disorders that emerge during adolescence.

Rebecca Marshall, Ph.D.

Rebecca Marshall Ph..d. is the PI on a project called Crisis and Transition Services, which is evaluating outcomes of a statewide program providing transitional services for youth who present to Emergency Departments in a mental health crisis.  Dr. Marshall is developing a project called the Stay Safe App for Youth (STAY), an app for suicidal youth discharging from EDs and inpatient units, and developing research looking at ketamine use for kids with severe treatment-refractory depression.  Dr. Marshall is also an advisor to a number of medical students, residents, and fellows on research projects. 

Infant Neurodevelopment, Stress, Prevention, and Intervention Research (INSPIRE) Lab – Alice Graham, Ph.D.

The INSPIRE Lab is an interdisciplinary group focused on advancing understanding of how the early environment, starting in the prenatal period, influences brain development and risk for psychiatric disorders. We use structural and functional MRI to characterize developing brain systems. We conduct preventive intervention research with the aim of ameliorating effects of exposure to early life stress and supporting healthy brain development. The overarching goal of this work is to prevent psychiatric disorders and improve cognitive and emotional health across the lifespan.

Methamphetamine Abuse Research Center (MARC)

The Methamphetamine Abuse Research Center (MARC) at OHSU and the Portland Health Care System (VAPHCS)  is a new NIDA center approaching drug research at all these levels, in a truly translational context. This means we study meth addiction "from bench to bedside" — all the way from the genetics or pharmacology lab to the patient who comes in for treatment.

OHSU Department of Psychiatry Measurement-based Care Project - Whitney Black, M.D.

The mission of the OHSU Department of Psychiatry Measurement-based Care Project is to enhance the delivery of evidence-based practices in mental health care to improve access and outcomes. 

Measurement-based care (MBC), or the systematic use of patient-reported data to monitor treatment progress and inform care decisions, has been shown to improve psychiatric treatment outcomes.The aims of the OHSU Measurement-based Care Project include: the identification of factors contributing to the measurement-based care research-to-practice gap; the utilization of implementation science & technology to increase uptake of MBC; and the improvement of patient outcomes through the use of patient generated data.   OHSU clinicians and researchers participating in the project are responsible for collecting, organizing, and disseminating findings to key stakeholders both locally and nationally.

Psychoneuroimmunology Research Lab - Jennifer Loftis, Ph.D.

Psychoneuroimmunology is the study of interactions between the immune and central nervous systems, and particularly how these interactions contribute to psychiatric function and health. Our program is a “real time,” translational research program that integrates human, animal, and in vitro experiments to examine how neuroimmune factors contribute to the neuropsychiatric effects of medical, psychiatric, and substance use disorders.

Psychopharmacology Lab - Aaron Janowsky, Ph.D.

The Psychopharmacology Lab studies the effects of drugs that are involved in substance use disorders.  We are currently focused on newly designed abused drugs and contaminants of illicit drugs, and how they interact with cloned human proteins to affect behavior.  These studies also allow us to examine basic physiological mechanisms involved in substance use disorders as well as other neuropsychiatric disorders including depression, schizophrenia, and Parkinson’s Disease.    

Suicide Prevention Research Impact NeTwork (SPRINT) - Coordinating Center, VHA HSRD

The mission of the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) Health Services Research and Development (HSR&D) Suicide Prevention Research Impact NeTwork (SPRINT) is to accelerate VA health services suicide prevention (SP) research that will improve care and reduce suicide behaviors among Veterans. With a focus on population health, over 5 years, SPRINT will serve as a collaborative network of VHA and non-VHA researchers that is dedicated to conducting high-quality, high-priority, and high impact health services research. OHSU investigators located at VA Portland Health Care System are leading SPRINT’s Communications/Organization Hub which is coordinating overall SPRINT activities and responsible for collecting, organizing and helping to disseminate key information to SPRINT members and other stakeholders.

Stress, Cognition, Affect, & Neuroimaging (SCAN) Lab - Kristen Mackiewicz Seghete, Ph.D.

We are interested in understanding the development of cognitive and affective brain processes and how these processes are affected by stressful events.

Translational Research of Adolescent Change (TRAC) Lab - Sarah Feldstein Ewing, Ph.D.

The TRAC Lab aims to increase understanding of the links between basic biological mechanisms, effective interventions for reducing risky behaviors, and adolescent health outcomes.

Center to Improve Veteran Involvement in Care (CIVIC)

Center to Improve Veteran Involvement in Care (CIVIC) 's mission is to conduct research that empowers Veterans to improve their health by enhancing active participation of Veterans and their supports in healthcare. CIVIC investigators will, in particular, focus on patients who have psychological challenges or other vulnerabilities that impact self-management and recovery.'s mission is to conduct research that empowers Veterans to improve their health by enhancing active participation of Veterans and their supports in healthcare. CIVIC investigators will, in particular, focus on patients who have psychological challenges or other vulnerabilities that impact self-management and recovery.

CIVIC Core Investigators

Jason Chen, Ph.D.

Jason I. Chen, Ph.D. is a Center to Improve Veteran Involvement in Care (CIVIC)  Core Investigator, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Clinical Psychology Program Research Faculty at OHSU. His research interests include suicide prevention for high risk populations, community-based approaches, and help-seeking processes. Dr. Chen will be characterizing ED care for suicidal patients and identifying gaps in current best practices to inform the development of future ED-based interventions. He is beginning his VA HSR&D-funded Career Development Award, which will develop a community engagement intervention for recently psychiatrically hospitalized Veterans.

Steven Dobscha, M.D.

Dr. Steven Dobscha’s research focuses on topics that are highly relevant to the care of Veterans including chronic pain, prescription opiate use, suicide prevention, and patient-centered care. Dr. Dobscha and his team are currently developing and evaluating a program to train primary care clinicians to deliver means safety messaging to Veterans at risk for suicide seen in primary care settings.

Travis Lovejoy, Ph.D.

Travis Lovejoy, Ph.D., MPH is a clinical psychologist with specialized training in quantitative methodologies, health psychology, behavioral medicine, and substance use disorders. Dr. Lovejoy’s research interests include the scientific development, testing, and implementation of theory-based clinical and health services interventions that improve individual and population health. Dr. Lovejoy’s research approaches include large retrospective administrative database studies, prospective cohort studies, clinical and health services efficacy and effectiveness trials, and mixed methods approaches to study the implementation of evidence-based practices.

Benjamin Morasco, Ph.D.

Benjamin Morasco, Ph.D. is a staff psychologist at the VA Portland Health Care System and Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at Oregon Health and Science University. His primary research focus is on improving the safety and effectiveness of treatment for chronic pain. Dr. Morasco’s currently funded projects are examining chronic pain treatment outcomes for patients prescribed chronic opioid therapy, evaluating barriers and facilitators for different strategies to reduce prescription opioid abuse, and conducting a randomized trial of an intervention designed to improve the safety of opioid therapy for patients with chronic pain.

Maya O'Neil, Ph.D.

Maya O'Neil, PhD is a Center to Improve Veteran Involvement in Care (CIVIC)  Core Investigator and neuropsychologist at the VA Portland Health Care System, and Assistant Professor at OHSU in the Departments of Psychiatry and Medical Informatics and Clinical Epidemiology. Her current research focuses on assessing and treating cognitive problems in Veterans with PTSD, which was recently funded by the VA through a Career Development Award. She is the Principal Investigator of two OHSU projects funded by AHRQ and the National Center for PTSD examining randomized controlled trial data on PTSD interventions.

Alan Teo, M.D., M.S.

Dr. Teo's primary research focus is on the role of social relationships in influencing mental health outcomes. He studies how social support and social ties--with peers, family, and others--can buffer against mental illness, and conversely how social isolation may be both a risk factor and negative outcome of mental illness. He has methodological expertise in survey development and secondary data analyses of population-based datasets.