Liaison Committee on Medical Education

See the “me” in LCME: Counting down to OHSU School of Medicine site visit on Jan. 12-15, 2020

The Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) is the nationally recognized accrediting authority for medical education programs leading to the M.D. degree in U.S. and Canadian medical schools. Sponsored by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) and the American Medical Association (AMA), the LCME accreditation process occurs every eight years and has two aims:

  • To certify that a medical education program meets prescribed standards for function, structure, and performance.
  • To promote institutional and programmatic self-evaluation and improvement.

See also: YOUR M.D. curriculum overview

"The LCME visit comes at an important moment for the School of Medicine. In our medical education program, and across the school, we have a heightened focus on wellness, diversity and inclusion, and collaboration across the institution to better align our systems in support of our students faculty and staff. The LCME is about continuous improvement, and so are we." - Dean Sharon Anderson

How you can see the "me" in LCME

The self-study process will bring together hundreds of individuals: basic and clinical science faculty, administrators, staff, trainees and students. It is an opportunity for institutional self-reflection and continuous quality improvement. Committees can use their work to improve the school overall.

OHSU members can check this O2 page for updates

Other important facts and dates to note:

  • Aug. 30, 2018 – LCME kickoff event
  • Seven self-study committees, including one comprised entirely of medical students, will meet regularly to assess OHSU in the context of the LCME's 12 standards and 93 associated elements
  • Oct. 21, 2019 – deadline for submitting the self-study package to the LCME
  • Jan. 12-15, 2020 – LCME site visit
  • Tracy Bumsted, M.D., M.P.H., associate dean for undergraduate medical education, OHSU School of Medicine, is the Faculty Accreditation Lead for the LCME process
  • Meghan Rogers, program technician, is the LCME site visit coordinator

Students embrace opportunity to assess learning environment

Students play an essential role in the self-study process. As required by the LCME, a student committee composed only of medical students, will create and distribute a detailed questionnaire and present their findings in an independent report to the LCME.

Dozens of medical students expressed early interest in helping with the LCME process. Graduate students in the M.D./Ph.D. program are offering their expertise in data analysis to understanding the student-led questionnaire. Here are a couple examples of how students are seeing the "me" in LCME:

"I have been involved with multiple hospital surveys in the past and have seen how processes like this effect long, lasting change. I originally applied to OHSU because I was excited by their vision for being agile and responsive to the needs of a new type of learner in a new health care environment. I want to do my part expand that vision."

- Brianna Pickering, M.D. Class of 2022

"I want to gain more of an understanding of the complexities of health care education, so I can better navigate through this system myself, to support my peers and others who want to access higher education and medical education. I am also very passionate about education and student affairs."

- Derek Song, M.D. Class of 2021

The LCME accreditation process provides us with an opportunity to review all aspects of our medical education program, to assess challenges and to chart a course for enhancing it. The last full-scale accreditation review for the OHSU School of Medicine was in January 2012.

Previous LCME updates

November 3, 2017

The Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) is the accrediting agency for U.S. and Canadian undergraduate medical education (MD) programs.

As announced previously, the OHSU School of Medicine submitted an action plan to address areas for improvement the LCME identified following the school's institutional self-study and full site visit held in January 2012. The action plan was accepted and the LCME conducted a limited site survey in January 2014. 

The results of that visit were positive and there were no areas that were found to be non-compliant with the LCME's standards and elements. However, the LCME concluded that several areas such as diversity, student indebtedness and academic advising needed continued monitoring. As a result, the school has had to submit annual status reports to demonstrate continued improvement in areas that had previously raised concerns.   

In August 2017, the school submitted its last status report to the LCME as part of the agency's monitoring process. In October, the school was notified that the LCME had reviewed the August status report and found that no elements needed continued monitoring. Importantly, the school has maintained its full accreditation throughout this process. The difference is that the LCME no longer needs to continue to monitor any of the issues that were raised in 2012.

"We're proud of this outcome," said George Mejicano, M.D., senior associate dean for education, OHSU School of Medicine. "It demonstrates the school's multi-year commitment to achieving full LCME compliance and to embracing a culture of continual improvement and accountability. We have a better M.D. program and educational environment as a result of the LCME review process."

The school's next full site visit by the LCME will take place during the 2019-2020 academic year.

June 26, 2015

The Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) is the accrediting agency for U.S. and Canadian undergraduate medical education (MD) programs. As announced previously, the School of Medicine submitted an action plan to address the areas for improvement the LCME identified following the school’s institutional self-study and full site visit held in January 2012. 

In April 2015, the OHSU School of Medicine submitted a status report to the LCME as part of the agency’s monitoring process. Last week, the school was notified that the LCME had reviewed the April status report and found no areas of non-compliance. The school remains fully accredited and the standards related to facilities and resources in support of the M.D. program were fully compliant.

In contrast, the LCME found that three areas were compliant but in need of continued monitoring. The three areas are student debt and financial debt counseling; academic advising; and diversity. Importantly, the School of Medicine continues to make improvements in each of these areas. The next status report is due in April 2016 and the next full site visit by the LCME will take place during the 2019-2020 academic year.  

“We were pleased to report to the LCME on our continued progress in these areas,” said George Mejicano, M.D., senior associate dean for education, OHSU School of Medicine. “The outcome of this report shows our continual commitment to quality improvement and to creating a supportive environment for our medical students.”

School in compliance with all LCME standards, notified of full accreditation

July 8, 2014

An ad hoc survey team representing the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) visited the OHSU School of Medicine in January 2014. The LCME is the accrediting agency for U.S. and Canadian undergraduate medical education (UME) programs.

The purpose of the limited, or focused, survey visit was to review progress on the School of Medicine’s action plan to address the areas for improvement the LCME identified following the school’s institutional self-study and full site visit held in January 2012.

Following the full site visit in 2012, the LCME determined that the school was in noncompliance with six accreditation standards. In addition, the LCME determined that the school was in compliance with a need for monitoring in five additional standards.

As announced previously, the school then submitted an action plan to make improvements in the identified areas, two of which – diversity and medical student indebtedness – were concerns identified in a 2004 site visit and represent challenges that the school has been actively trying to rectify for some time.

The action plan, submitted to the LCME in December 2012, described specific steps which would be taken at OHSU and within the School of Medicine to address these issues, such as increasing the availability of student grants-in-aid by identifying any and all funding sources. The LCME then scheduled the January 2014 follow-up visit to assess the school’s progress.

The LCME reported its findings from the January 2014 survey visit to Dean Richardson the week of July 7. The LCME found that the school was in full compliance with all accreditation standards and confirmed full accreditation. The LCME notifed the school that the next full survey will take place during the 2019-2020 academic year.

“We are a better school because of the work undertaken related to our LCME review process,” said Dean Mark Richardson. “I want to thank our faculty, students, staff and many others who worked together not only to make the January visit a success, but saw in these efforts the opportunity to improve our educational environment and help establish a strong foundation for the launch of our new M.D. curriculum this fall.”

The LCME identified six areas that would benefit from ongoing monitoring in advance of the 2019-2020 site visit.

“These six standards relate to areas that we agree need continued monitoring, including diversity, student financial aid and debt management,” said Senior Associate Dean George Mejicano. “We have long-term goals related to these issues and our plans may occasionally need adjusting based on future data.”

December 12, 2013

An ad hoc survey team representing the Liaison Committee on Medical Education will visit OHSU in January 2014. The purpose of the limited, or focused, survey visit is to review progress on the School of Medicine’s accepted action plan to address the 11 areas needing attention that the LCME identified following the review of the School’s institutional self-study and full site visit held in January 2012. The LCME is the accrediting agency for U.S. and Canadian undergraduate medical education (UME) programs.

The visit will take place from January 12 to 15, 2014. Dean Mark Richardson will first lead the LCME survey team through a discussion of the 11 areas that are the focus of this limited survey. A number of education leaders, including Senior Associate Dean for Education George Mejicano, M.D., and Associate Dean for Undergraduate Medical Education Tracy Bumsted, M.D., MPH, will be involved in the visit.

“The School of Medicine is committed to providing an excellent educational experience for all our medical students, and I’m confident that the visit will demonstrate our ongoing process of improvement,” said Dr. Mejicano. “I would like to thank in advance the faculty, staff and students who are participating in this LCME visit. Your participation is vital and helps ensure a successful visit.”

In 2012, the LCME determined that the School was in noncompliance with six accreditation standards. In addition, the LCME determined that the School was in compliance with a need for monitoring in five additional standards. As announced previously, the school submitted an action plan to make improvements in the identified areas, two of which – diversity and medical student indebtedness – were concerns identified in the 2004 site visit and represent challenges that the school has been actively trying to rectify for some time. The action plan, submitted to the LCME in December 2012, described specific steps which would be taken at OHSU and within the School of Medicine to address these issues, such as increasing the availability of student grants-in-aid by identifying any and all funding sources.

The School of Medicine, along with multiple OHSU partners, including the Office of the President, the Office of the Provost and the Center for Diversity & Inclusion, has made measurable progress on each of the identified accreditation standards. A briefing book, supporting documents and results of two recent surveys – one to students and one to faculty and staff – were submitted to the LCME in early December in preparation for the January 2014 visit, and are available for OHSU faculty, students and staff on the internal O2 LCME website.

During the visit, the LCME team will also receive an update on the M.D. Curriculum Transformation Initiative, and the changes being implemented starting with the entering class in August 2014.

March 7, 2013

School of Medicine leaders, faculty and staff created plan to address identified areas of noncompliance in the undergraduate medical education program.

The School of Medicine’s action plan to address the areas of noncompliance identified in the January 2012 site visit of the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) has been fully accepted. The plan was submitted in December 2012 and Dean Mark Richardson was informed of the approval following the LCME’s February 2013 meeting. The LCME is the accrediting agency for U.S. and Canadian undergraduate medical education (UME) programs.

“This necessary and noteworthy step assures us that our actions are appropriately targeted to address self-identified challenges in the undergraduate medical education program,” said Dean Richardson. “I’d like to thank the countless faculty and staff members who have been working together on the LCME action plan, and in particular, Senior Associate Dean for Education, George Mejicano, and Director for LCME Accreditation, Jennifer Boyd, for their leadership of this process.”

The School of Medicine UME program’s accreditation site visit and review by the LCME in January 2012 was the school’s first full-scale review since 2004. As announced previously, the LCME identified six accreditation standards that are in noncompliance, and four areas that are in compliance, with a need for monitoring. The school submitted an action plan to make improvements in the identified areas.

Two of the areas – diversity and medical student indebtedness – were concerns identified in the 2004 site visit and represent challenges that the school has been actively trying to rectify for some time. In the self-study portion of the LCME review, the school recognized that “lowering the level of medical school indebtedness” and “increasing diversity within the school” continue to be areas for improvement. The action plan describes specific steps being taken at OHSU and within the School of Medicine to address these issues, such as increasing the availability of student grants-in-aid by identifying any and all funding sources.

“The School of Medicine is committed to a process of continuous quality improvement across all of our educational programs, and this outcome demonstrates that commitment,” said Dean Richardson.

The school will continue to share information about this topic, including the LCME-focused survey that will take place sometime within the next 12 months.

August 29, 2012
 
In July, Dean Richardson shared information about the results of our accreditation site visit and review by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) of the undergraduate medical education (UME) program.

The results from the LCME are that the UME program continues to be fully accredited. The accreditation also included a “warning” based on six areas of non-compliance (out of a total of 129 standards reviewed by the LCME).  The warning status is provided to a school so that is can make improvements in the identified areas while maintaining full accreditation. The School of Medicine is now developing action plans to respond to those six areas.

Four of these areas relate to curricular issues (e.g., observation of student taking a patient history). The Office of the Dean is already taking steps and enhancing resources as needed, as part of making immediate progress on the action plans.

Two of the areas – diversity and student indebtedness, including financial aid and debt counseling – are more complicated to address. These are longstanding challenges that the School of Medicine has been actively trying to rectify for some time.  Some additional context for each of these areas follows.

  • Diversity: Recognizing that the goals for diversity for individual institutions will vary, the LCME does not mandate a specific diversity definition. Rather, an institution is asked to develop a definition and to identify a strategic plan related to that definition. OHSU adopted a diversity plan several years ago. Now, as part of the action plan, our definition of diversity—which considers diverse characteristics of students such as rural heritage and family adversity, as well as ethnic and racial diversity – will be expanded and clarified. In addition, ways to further enhance faculty and staff diversity are being explored.
  • Student indebtedness: The School of Medicine resident tuition and fees are among the highest of publicly-funded U.S. medical schools. The level of our student indebtedness is also high – too high, as judged both by the School of Medicine’s self-study and the LCME. The action plan for this area of “non-compliance” will detail a number of strategies, including engaging with the state for tuition relief, aggressively seeking new scholarship support for M.D. students, and providing more comprehensive debt management counseling.

The School of Medicine met August 13 and 14 with the LCME Secretariat at OHSU to gain greater insight into and guidance for the development of the action plans. The action plans will be submitted to the LCME on Dec. 15, 2012, for review at the February 2013 LCME meeting. Following this, we will submit a detailed narrative report next summer and a limited survey site visit will be scheduled for the School of Medicine for fall 2013. After this fall visit, the LCME will determine the School of Medicine’s accreditation status and, assuming we show appropriate progress, remove the warning status.

“It is important to remember that we remain fully accredited. We now have the opportunity to demonstrate more completely the quality of our educational programs and our commitment to reversing the trend of rising student debt and to more effectively increasing diversity,” said Dean Richardson.

Senior Associate Dean for Education George Mejicano, M.D., M.S., who participated in the recent LCME visit, will oversee the development and implementation of the final action plans, along with Jennifer Boyd, Ph.D., MBA, director, LCME Accreditation.

Action plan underway to bring school into full compliance

July 11, 2012

The School of Medicine Undergraduate Medical Education (UME) program underwent a full-scale accreditation site visit and review by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) in January this year. This was the school's first full-scale review since 2004.

Faculty and students were deeply involved in preparation for the review. They directly participated in the process by providing data, helping prepare reports and attending meetings. The entire process was transparent and inclusive, and comprehensively addressed all 129 LCME accreditation standards, driven by a commitment to continuous quality improvement.

"Thanks to the hard work and dedication of all involved, I'm proud to say the LCME process drove much positive change, while also demonstrating the undeniable quality of the OHSU undergraduate medical education program," said Dean Mark Richardson. "I'm pleased to report that our UME program continues to be accredited."

The LCME has adopted new accreditation terminology. "In compliance with a need for monitoring" has replaced the previous designation of "in transition." Regarding accreditation status, determinations include "Accredited"; "Accredited, with Warning"; "Accredited, on Probation"; and "Not Accredited."

The LCME confirmed the findings of the site visitors to OHSU President Joe Robertson. The current accreditation status includes a "warning."

The designation, the LCME concluded, was based on six (out of 129 reviewed) areas of noncompliance. These are 1) diversity among students, faculty, and staff; 2) observation by an attending physician of students obtaining a patient history and performing a physical exam; 3) fair and timely formative and summative assessment of medical students; 4) narrative description of medical student performance in each required course and clerkship rotation; 5) financial aid and debt management counseling; and 6) impact of direct educational expenses on medical student indebtedness.

These six are significantly less than the 14 areas of noncompliance or transition indicated in the school’s last full accreditation review in 2004, after which it was fully accredited. The majority of noncompliance areas the LCME cited in 2004 have been satisfactorily resolved. But because some of the noncompliance areas were concerns cited in 2004 – specifically diversity and medical student indebtedness – the LCME voted to place the school on “warning.” Although the school has made progress on diversity and medical student indebtedness, they were not fully resolved.

These are longstanding challenges that the School of Medicine has been actively trying to rectify for some time. In the self-study portion of the LCME review, the school recognized that "lowering the level of medical school indebtedness" and "increasing diversity within the school" continue to be areas for improvement.

Regarding student debt, OHSU ranks second to last among public medical schools nationwide for financial support it receives from the state. The school is deeply concerned about student debt and is in full-court press to find ways to alleviate it. Student scholarships are among the school's highest priorities, as well as identifying any and all funding sources.

Recently, the state approved OHSU's use of $13 million in previously restricted funding to help support scholarships for medical students. This was the direct result of School of Medicine recommendations identified during the LCME review process.

"While this warning designation is not the outcome we all worked so hard for, we have the opportunity to clear it quickly from our status and we will clear it," said Dean Richardson. "As we craft our action plan to address areas of concern—which will include bringing renewed urgency and vigor to plans already underway­—your energetic and committed involvement will be crucial to our success."

The school must submit its action plan by December 15, 2012 for consideration at the LCME's February 2013 meeting. Following its consideration of the action plan, the LCME will review the accreditation status of the UME program and set a date for a limited survey to assess the areas of noncompliance as well as additional areas LCME identified are in compliance but require monitoring. The school must demonstrate sufficient progress toward compliance within 12 months.

December 01, 2011
 
At the beginning of November, the OHSU School of Medicine (SoM) self-study team mailed the SoM self-study report to each of the five members of the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) accreditation survey team assigned to OHSU, as well as the American Medical Association (AMA) and the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC). Completing and submitting the LCME accreditation self-study was a major step in preparation for the LCME survey team’s accreditation visit to OHSU on Jan. 22-25, 2012. Our submission included the Medical Student LCME Accreditation Self-Study and appended materials, undergraduate medical education (UME) course and clerkship forms, the LCME database with our responses to the 129 accreditation standards, and the self-study narrative summary. Together, these documents weighed in at 17.5 pounds of information about the School of Medicine.
 
During the upcoming January site visit, the survey team will review compliance with each accreditation standard; meet with students, SoM faculty and administrators, and Dean Mark Richardson; and assess the learning environment for medical student education. The survey team will have reviewed all the information we provided and be knowledgeable about our self-study process, the undergraduate medical education program and the School of Medicine.

Preparation for the survey team visit involves a myriad of details, from reserving hotel rooms to scheduling meetings with department chairs. Perhaps the best way we can prepare to highlight our many strengths as a medical school—including our students, faculty, staff and programs—is to make sure we share an understanding of the UME program and its mission. Reviewing the self-study narrative summary is a great way to come to a collective understanding of the MD program.

The self-study narrative provides an overview of the UME program’s evolution and growth since the 2004 LCME accreditation review. It tells the story of our self-study process and action steps taken to address the concerns raised in the 2004 LCME accreditation review. The narrative is organized into the five sections of the LCME database: institutional setting, education program for the MD degree, medical students, faculty and educational resources. It also includes a summary of strengths of the UME program, areas identified for continued improvement, and recommendations stemming from the self-study process.

October 25, 2011
 
The Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) accreditation survey team will visit OHSU in three short months. Below is a summary of the visit and the efforts taken in preparation for the School of Medicine’s (SOM) accreditation self-study report, now in the final stages.

WHAT’S BEEN DONE

The Medical Student LCME Accreditation Self-Study and appended materials, as well as the course and clerkship forms, are now being printed.

The LCME database with our responses to the 130+ accreditation standards is complete. The database provides a comprehensive qualitative and quantitative analysis of SOM governance, the undergraduate medical education (UME) program, medical student services, SOM faculty and educational resources.

The self-study narrative is undergoing final editing and tells a compelling story of the UME program’s evolution and growth since the 2004 LCME accreditation review.

WHAT TO EXPECT

The LCME accreditation survey team will visit OHSU Jan. 22-25, 2012. The five-member team’s first meeting is with Dean Mark Richardson regarding SOM governance and administration.

On Monday, Jan. 23, the team will review the undergraduate medical education program and SOM facilities. On Tuesday, Jan. 24, the team’s focus will be on medical students, educational resources, SOM finances and the clinical and basic science departments.

On the final day of the visit, the team meets with SOM faculty, assesses the overall academic environment, and has an exit conference with Dean Richardson, OHSU Provost Jeanette Mladenovic and President Joe Robertson.

NOTING OUR STRENGTHS

The LCME accreditation self-study process has involved more than 150 faculty, staff and students in data collection and assessment. Together, we’ve identified many strong points in the UME program as well as some areas where we want to do better. Notable strengths include:

  • The positive relationship of the SOM with OHSU Hospital and with our community clinical partners in Portland and throughout Oregon.
  • The quality and competitiveness of OHSU MD graduates, both in primary care and specialty areas, student services and the educational resources available to medical students, including the OHSU Library.
  • OHSU Student Health Services and the Clinical Skills Assessment & Simulation Center.
  • The collegiality, quality and clinical and scholarly productivity of SOM faculty emerge as major strengths throughout both the LCME accreditation database and self-study narrative analysis. 

FOCUS ON IMPROVEMENT

The self-study process also points to areas we need to improve, which include:

  • Lowering the level of medical student indebtedness.
  • Increasing diversity within the School of Medicine.
  • Continuing to increase clinical teaching capacity.
  • Balancing productivity requirements for SOM faculty.

September 26, 2011
 
As we approach the October deadline to submit the School of Medicine accreditation database and self-study narrative to the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME), the value of the self-study process becomes increasing evident. Detailed information about all aspects of the undergraduate medical education (UME) program has been collected and assessed to complete the LCME database and to draft the School’s self-study narrative. This information continues to drive positive change and innovative solutions as we prepare for the January 22 – 25, 2012, LCME accreditation survey team visit.

The LCME accreditation self-study process has involved more than 150 faculty, staff, and students in data collection and assessment. We’ve identified many strong points in the UME program as well as some areas where we want to do better. Already action steps have been taken to build on identified strengths and to accelerate continuous improvement. The LCME database is now complete and is currently being reviewed to ensure we’ve answered the 130+ accreditation standards comprehensively and consistently. Following are a few of the recent self-study developments.

Curriculum Leadership Task Force
One exciting development springing from the LCME accreditation self-study process is the UME Curriculum Leadership Taskforce. The Taskforce focuses on documenting the strengths of the current UME curriculum and—with an eye to the new Collaborative Life Science Building—on identifying curricular needs for the increasing medical class size, including learning resources and faculty development. The UME Curriculum Leadership Task Force will consider the impact on the UME program of a longitudinal interprofessional curriculum, ensure that the UME Program Objectives are realized within the four-year undergraduate medical curriculum and that outcome measures are comprehensive and inform decisions regarding curriculum development.

Medical Student Focus Groups
The results of the LCME Accreditation Student Survey, conducted by the Medical Student Committee, and an executive summary are available on the LCME SOM website. As follow-up to this survey, the LCME Team compared survey data with the 2011 Graduate Questionnaire (GQ), which is also available on the LCME website. This comparison provided valuable insight to trends, application of knowledge acquired in Year 1 and 2 of the UME program to clerkship rotations, and student services.

Three medical student focus groups met with an outside facilitator to address several issues that both the LCME medical student survey and the GQ flagged, including financial issues, tutoring services, USMLE preparation, and differences among the on-hill and community-based clerkship rotations for medical students, issues impacting quality of life and well-being. Some action steps already being taken include better aligning financial counseling with medical students’ immediate needs, and providing stress management and community-building activities for medical students.

Pipeline Programs OHSU Student Survey
An LCME standard requires medical schools to develop programs or partnerships aimed at broadening diversity among qualified applicants for medical school admission. The School of Medicine partners with the OHSU Center for Diversity and Multicultural Affairs (CeDMA), as well as other university and community partners, to expand the pool of qualified diverse applicants, to support diverse students and ensure cultural competency, and to enhance diversity in all areas of the school. For years Oregon students, ranging from elementary school to post-baccalaureate, have participated in a rich variety of OHSU-sponsored or affiliated programs. This week a survey was distributed to all OHSU students to learn more about the impact of OHSU programs on encouraging students to pursue careers in the health and science professions.

06/24/11 

HIGHLIGHTS

  • LCME Medical Student Committee survey of medical students now available
  • Survey addressed faculty-student relationships, student services, curriculum, facilities and student well-being
  • Results provide valuable data for administrators and staff
  • Survey will inform LCME student self-study narrative and direct needed improvements in student experience

As part of the School of Medicine self-study process and preparation for the accreditation survey visit by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) on Jan. 22-25, 2012, the LCME Medical Student Committee has conducted an in-depth survey of OHSU medical students. The results of the survey—which had a response rate of greater than 90 percent—are now available.

The LCME Medical Student Committee worked diligently to create a valid and comprehensive survey instrument, and to compile and assess the data. Cindy Morris, PhD, MPH, Assistant Dean for Admissions and Professor, Department of Medical Informatics & Clinical Epidemiology, served as advisor to the committee. To help ensure participation by students in all four years of the undergraduate medical education (UME) program, the Dean's Office offered a $250 award to each class that achieved greater than 80 percent participation in the student survey. The survey was administered to students between February and April to ensure the maximum number of students in each class could respond.

The survey’s goal was to collect comprehensive feedback from all students on the state of OHSU's UME program, including a broad range of topics such as faculty-student relationships, student services, the UME curriculum, facilities, and student well-being. In developing the survey, the Student Committee took into account issues universal to medical education as well as topics specific to the OHSU UME program.

The 2011 LCME Self-Study Medical Student Survey provides valuable data for faculty administrators and staff regarding the UME program and the experience of OHSU medical students. The survey will inform the LCME medical student self-study narrative, and areas of student concern identified in the survey will be the topic of upcoming student focus groups. The overall self-study process and work of the Medical Student Committee will drive needed improvements in student services, the curriculum and facilities, with some improvements already underway, and serve as the basis for enhancing the overall quality of OHSU’s UME program.

Activated in October 2010, the LCME Medical Student Committee is co-chaired by Gabriel Andeen, Jessica Carlson, and Lauren Moneta. Each medical school class is represented on the Committee by five to eight student members.

To read a summary of the 2011 OHSU Medical Student Survey and to learn which areas medical students reported as strengths or concerns, visit the School of Medicine’s LCME internal website. 

05/24/11

Highlights:

  • The accreditation team is finishing LCME Database – the foundation for our self-study narrative
  • LCME Student Committee is compiling results of the medical student survey
  • School of Medicine Alliance has earmarked funds to improve Student Lounge and study areas
  • General resource needs assessment continues

The School of Medicine accreditation self-study process for the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) continues to generate valuable information about all aspects of the undergraduate medical education program. As the June 1, 2011 target for completing the LCME Database nears, the SoM LCME Accreditation Team and the 11 accreditation committees remain on track to meet the deadline. The Database, which addresses the 130+ LCME accreditation standards, serves as the foundation for the School’s self-study narrative. Both documents and other support materials will be submitted to the LCME next fall in preparation for the LCME survey team site visit Jan. 22-25, 2012.

The LCME accreditation self-study process involves more than 150 faculty, staff and students in data collection and assessment to identify strengths we can build on and areas where we can do better. The self-study is already driving change, stimulating innovation and helping support an environment of continuous improvement. Following are a few of the recent self-study developments.

LCME student survey

The LCME Student Committee conducted a survey of all OHSU medical students, with a 92 percent response rate. The preliminary results of the 2011 LCME Student Survey are now being reviewed, and the Student Committee will hold focus groups with students in August. The sample size was 457, which includes all four medical program classes, and MD/MPH and MD/PhD students. Students were asked about the MD program in the following areas: Student-Faculty Relationships & Policies, Academic Counseling, Career/Residency Counseling, Personal Counseling, Financial Aid Services, Student Health Services, Center for Diversity and Multicultural Affairs (CeDMA), Curriculum, School and University Facilities, Community – Interprofessional Education, Student Safety and Quality of Life and Well Being. Student focus groups will concentrate on key findings of the survey and make recommendations. Final results of the survey will be posted in the Student Info section of the internal LCME website (login required).

Student areas improvements

Also related to OHSU medical students, the School of Medicine Alliance (SMA) has earmarked up to $5,000 for improvements in the Old Library Student Lounge and study areas. Improvements to date include desk chairs and study tables, better lighting, removal of broken furniture, and general repairs and cleaning. During summer break, new workstations and furniture will be installed and painting and repairs completed. A 2008 SMA project supported furnishing Call Rooms for medical students in OHSU Hospital.

General resource needs assessment

The LCME committee reports and recommendations, as well as the overall self-study process, help identify areas requiring resources. Some of the areas identified by LCME committees to date include faculty development for teaching roles; student financial aid, support for medical student scholarships, and student debt management counseling; and database development for important aspects of the undergraduate medical education program, particularly in the areas of outcomes, competency assessment, and program standards. 

For additional information and updates regarding the LCME accreditation self-study process, visit the LCME internal website (login required). 

04/22/11

Highlights

  • SOM Curriculum Committee approves revised UME Program Objectives
  • Survey indicates over 80% of faculty understands how their work supports OHSU's mission
  • Faculty development responses being examined

Since its official launch last October, the School of Medicine self-study accreditation process for the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) has been moving forward in high gear. Ten faculty committees and the Medical Student Committee have been working diligently to complete the LCME database, which addresses the 130+ LCME accreditation standards. The Database, now being reviewed by the SOM Dean’s Office LCME Accreditation Team, serves as the foundation for the LCME self-study narrative. The committee reports, recommendations, and the overall self-study process are the basis for strategic planning and initiatives.

The self-study process brings together more than 100 individuals: basic and clinical science faculty, administrators, staff, and students as well as community members affiliated with OHSU. In addition, the SOM self-study process reaches across the entire school through data collection and status reports. Following are some of the change-driving activities coming from the LCME committees.

The newly revised Undergraduate Medical Education (UME) Program Objectives are a significant outcome of the self-study accreditation process and work of the Educational Objectives Committee, chaired by Dr. Patrick Brunett. The SOM Curriculum Committee has approved the revised UME Program Objectives. The revised objectives are organized within the ACGME core competencies. Clerkship and Course Directors are now mapping where in the UME curriculum the objectives are taught and evaluated. This effort is an important step in ensuring that course and clerkship objectives encompass the UME Program Objectives and in developing a robust Curriculum Management System.

The Medical Student Self-Study is well underway. The medical student survey has been distributed to all classes, and the Student Committee—co-chaired by Gabriel Andeen, Jessica Carlson, and Lauren Moneta—reports a better than 90% response rate. Results of the study will be posted in the Student Info section of the internal LCME website. Focus groups will concentrate on key findings of the survey.

In December 2010, the LCME Self-Study Faculty Committee—chaired by Dr. Patrice Eiff—conducted a survey of SOM primary faculty to get input on the annual review process. The survey indicates that over 80% of faculty (all ranks) understands how their work supports OHSU's mission. Approximately two-thirds of faculty are satisfied with their mix of teaching, research, patient care, administration, and/or outreach activities, with no differences reported between men and women faculty members. However, a significant number of faculty (44%) believe that productivity requirements in research or clinical service have affected their ability to participate in teaching activities and that teaching is undervalued compared to other missions. The LCME Accreditation Self-Study Steering Committee will evaluate the recommendation for greater institutional and departmental support for teaching and for faculty development in the education and assessment of medical students.

Another recent self-study action focuses on faculty development. To get a comprehensive picture of faculty development efforts to assist faculty in improving their skills in teaching and assessing medical students, SOM department chairs and administrators were asked about faculty development efforts within their department. We received responses from 21 of the 25 SOM departments, with faculty development efforts ranging from “none, because our faculty don’t really teach medical students,” to “we encourage our faculty to participate in faculty development offered by the SOM,” to departmental support for faculty attending national meetings that include faculty development, to departments offering monthly faculty development sessions, mentoring, and teaching skills workshops. Responses are being used to address LCME standards, to assess the level of faculty development within the departments, and to identify needs, best practices and opportunities for new faculty development offerings.