Endowed Chairs

(left to right) Susan Tolle, M.D. and Cornie Hayes Stevens

Cornelia Hayes Stevens Chair

Cornie Stevens has been described as "a visionary and guiding light" and has been an inspirational figure for the Center for Ethics in Health Care almost since its inception.  Her prodigious energy, discerning vision and steadfast commitment to her community have infused her important role in building the Center. The Cornelia Hayes Stevens Chair, currently held by Center director Susan Tolle, M.D., is a fitting tribute to this exuberant champion of the Center's work, whose unassuming modesty has been consistently contradicted by her impassioned leadership and selfless devotion.

Read more about the background of the Cornelia Hayes Stevens Chair

(left to right) Lynn A. Jansen, Ph.D., R.N. and Maddie Nelson

Madeline Brill Nelson Chair in Ethics Education

Inspired by the legacy of her father, Isidor C. Brill, M.D., and fueled by her own passionate determination to make the world a better place, Madeline Brill Nelson is one of the Center's most generous and devoted supporters. She was the first donor to step forward when the Center for Ethics in Health Care was founded and served as a quiet pioneer in her support of the Center's work. The Madeline Brill Nelson Chair in Ethics Education is an eloquent tribute to her father's extraordinary service to medicine, created to ensure that future generations of health care professionals aspire to the same highest principles of compassionate care. The chair is currently held by Lynn A. Jansen, Ph.D., R.N., the inaugural holder of the Madeline Brill Nelson Chair in Ethics Education. 
Read more about the background of the Madeline Brill Nelson Chair in Ethics Education. 

Miles J. Edwards, M.D.

Miles J. Edwards Chair in Professionalism and Comfort Care

Distinguished doctor, devoted ethicist, wise and caring mentor, faithful friend, gifted teacher and above all, honorable and compassionate humanitarian. These are the themes that recur again and again as family, colleagues, friends and a multitude of admirers have reflected on the life and accomplishments of Miles Edwards. Dr. Edwards worked quietly, often behind the scenes, nurturing each individual relationship with student, patient, or colleagues with his unfailing blend of patience, compassion and respect. 

Shortly before his death, Miles reflected on the role of the physician. He spoke of the need for a “deep understanding of the patient’s experience and each person’s unique value as a human being”.   He also  as the importance of “having respect for the patient’s self-respect.” These were deeply held and abiding principles for him. They guided his practice of medicine, fueled his passion for research and medical ethics, and they inspired his role as mentor and teacher. When asked how he wanted to spend his remaining days, he simply said that he would like to continue teaching.  And he did.  Not surprisingly, some of his greatest teaching moments came through his own last illness. He taught us not just through his discerning intelligence and insightful observations, but also through the remarkable courage, unfaltering honesty and graceful dignity with which he faced his own vulnerability and death. 

Read more about the background of the Miles J. Edwards Chair in Professionalism and Comfort Care.