Research Briefs

Understanding the science behind DOHaD

Below are links to brief summaries of scientific research that shows how the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) can predict chronic disease risk later in life.

  • How boys grow in the womb can put them more at risk for hypertension later in life:
    In the womb, boys have a more dangerous growth strategy than girls. Boys grow more rapidly and invest less in placental growth, putting them at risk of becoming undernourished if maternal nutrients becomes scarce during pregnancy. Since the placenta both nourishes the baby and sustains itself, banking on adequate nutrition from the mother in lieu of a larger placenta is a risky strategy that can lead to hypertension later in life. Read more
     
  • Maternal hypertension and pre-eclampsia are not only potential warnings for heart disease risk in the mother – but also in the offspring:
    Women who’ve had pre-eclampsia are three to four times more at risk for high blood pressure later in life, and have double the risk for heart disease and stroke. They also have an increased risk of developing diabetes. This research brief provides an overview of a recent article published in the April 2020 edition of the Journal of the American Heart Association. Read more
     
  • Weight at two years of age is linked to elevated risks for heart disease, insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome later in life:
    Investigators tested the hypothesis that the levels of these three hormones in healthy 20-year-olds was related to their growth patterns in childhood.  Read more about the results of this study, published in the February 2020 Journal of Endocrinology.