Research

Overview

Jacobs Lab is developing new technologies in the fields of diabetes, telehealth, and hearing science:

  • Closed loop artificial pancreas research and development
  • Ubiquitous computing in the home
  • Hearing research

These projects also interrelate in various ways. For example, we are studying how ubiquitous sensing using body-worn sensors can be used to predict and grade exercise in people with type 1 diabetes so as to adjust their insulin and glucagon dosing within the context of a closed loop artificial pancreas system (Mitigating Risk project). As another example of projects cross-relating, in addition to designing systems that assess hearing within a test facility, we create systems that can be used by patients within the home environment or by clinicians within a hospital ward (Comprehensive Ototoxicity Monitoring Program for VA project).
 

Figures representing range of lab's research focus.
Left to right: Ubiquitous computing in the home, bihormonal artificial pancreas, hearing science research

Ongoing research projects

Improving glycemic management in patients with type 1 diabetes using a context-aware automated insulin delivery system

Grant:  1 R01DK1225833-01
Program: NIH/NIDDK
Principal Investigator:  Peter Jacobs and Jessica Castle
Project start and end dates:  7/15/2019-6/1/2023
Project summary:  The objective of this project is to integrate contextual patterns of daily living as new inputs into an automated insulin delivery system to improve glycemic outcomes for people with type 1 diabetes.

Five graphs tracking various aspects of data regarding glycemic management.

Leveraging big data, virtual patient populations, and advanced machine learning to develop optimal personalized closed loop

Grant:  1-SRA-2019-820-S-B
Program: JDRF
Principal Investigator:  Peter Jacobs
Project start and end dates:  7/1/2019-6/30/2020
Project summary:  Funding for this project is to use the Tidepool big data set to design advanced machine learning and intelligent controls for personalized glucose control in type 1 diabetes.

Flow diagram displaying Inputs [CGM, insulin, meals, exercise, time-based context]. Next stage of chart shows two flowchart paths: ConvLayers and LSTM. Last step of flow chart is glucose prediction.

Improving glucose control with advanced technology designed for high risk patients with type 1 diabetes

Grant: NIH/NIDDK 1 R01DK120367-01
Program: NIH/NIDDK
Principal Investigator: Co-PIs Jacobs, Castle
Project Start and End Dates: 9/30/2018 - 6/30/2022

Project Summary: The objective of this project is to optimize the design and then evaluate a robust artificial pancreas system for use in patients with uncontrolled type 1 diabetes with HbA1C greater than 8% and compare HbA1C outcomes with these patients relative to a decision support system that utilizes continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) and multiple daily injection (MDI) therapy.

Glucose monitoring and control on digital devices.

Modeling of insulin and glucagon sensitivity during exercise in type 1 diabetes

Grant: NIH/NIDDK 1 R01 DK110175-01A1 
Program: NIH/NIDDK
Principal Investigator: Jacobs, El Youssef
Project start and end dates: 4/1/2017 –3/31/21

Project summary: The purpose of this project is to investigate how the glucoregulatory system responds to different exercise paradigms (aerobic and anaerobic) in order to develop an artificial pancreas (AP) system for better control of insulin and glucagon delivery in type 1 diabetes (T1D).

Exercise in diabetes initiative: The effect of exercise on glycemic control in type 1 diabetes (T1-DEXI)

Grant: Helmsley Charitable Trust
Program: HCT
Principal Investigator: Roy Beck (JAEB)
Co-investigator: Jacobs/Castle Sub-award co-PI
Project Start and End Dates: 11/30/2016 - present

Project Summary: A goal is to complete a protocol and a pilot study for a larger study that assesses how physical activity and nutrition impact glycemic control in people with type 1 diabetes. A second major goal is to complete the data acquisition hardware and software to support this study.

Improving glycemic control through integration of ubiquitous wearable sensors within a

modular open source artificial pancreas platform called iPancreas

iPancreas flowchart
The iPancreas platform is a tool that can be used by researchers and companies to rapidly build and deploy artificial pancreas algorithms for use on smart phones in clinical testing.

Grant: 2-SRA-2017-502-M-B
Program: Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation
Principal Investigator: Jacobs, Castle
Project start and end dates: 8/1/2017 –7/31/2019

Project summary: In this project, we are accomplishing three major goals. The primary goal is to the research community a flexible, fully customizable open access artificial pancreas platform called iPancreas that is capable of integrating custom control algorithms as well as multiple input signals (glucose sensors, physical activity, skin impedance, and others) for automating delivery of insulin and glucagon to a person with type 1 diabetes. A second goal is to build a smart-phone AP system using iPancreas called AP-Active that integrates glucose sensor data as well as heart rate and accelerometer data to inform a control algorithm that will respond better to physical activity and help maintain euglycemia while preventing exercise-induced hypoglycemia. And third, we plan to evaluate AP-Active in 25 participants with type 1 diabetes in an 8-week randomized cross-over trial during which participants will use AP-Active for 4 weeks and will use a standard AP for 4 weeks.

Design and evaluation of an MDI decision support system

Grant: 2018PG-T1D001
Program: Helmsley Charitable Trust
Principal Investigator: Jacobs, Castle
Project start and end dates: 5/1/2017 –4/30/2019

Project summary: Funding for this project is to develop a decision support system called DailyDose that will enable improved glucose control for people with type 1 diabetes using multiple-daily injection (MDI) therapy with a smart pen technology.

Flowchart displaying flow of information to and from DailyDose.
DailyDose is a decision support iOS-based smart-phone app that can be used by people with type 1 diabetes to better manage their glucose. It is designed to work with continuous glucose monitors, smart insulin pens and fitness trackers to provide suggestions around short-acting and long-acting insulin delivery.

Comprehensive fall prevention and detection in MS

Grant: 1l01RX001831-01A1 (Cameron)
Program: VA RR&D VA Rehabilitation Research and Development Merit Award
Principal Investigator: Michelle Cameron
Project start and end dates: January 1 2016 – December 31 2020
Co-investigator: Peter Jacobs

Project Summary: The objective of this grant is to develop and evaluate a fall detection and localization system that my research team is currently developing. The evaluation will take place within a cohort of patients with MS who fall often.

Past projects

Non-aqueous glucagon formulation to enable outpatient studies with a bi-hormonal pump

Grant: Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, Discovery & Development Partnership
Program: JDRF
Principal investigator: Castle, Jacobs, Petrelski
Project start and end dates: January 1st 2016 – December 31, 2017. Project summary:  iPancreas: Internet based on-demand artificial pancreas app-generator to accelerate clinical trials research

Project summary:The goal of this project is to test a bi-hormonal closed-loop system utilizing two omnipods, one to deliver aspart insulin and one to deliver stabilized glucagon (formulated by Xeris) as compared to an insulin alone closed-loop system and as compared to standard of care (sensor-augmented pump) in the outpatient setting.

Mitigating risk in a closed loop system by exercise detection and miniaturization

apc system

Grant1DP3DK101044-01
ProgramNIH National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)
Principal Investigators: Peter Jacobs, Jessica R. Castle
Project Start and End Dates: September 30, 2013 to September 29, 2017

Project Summary: The objective of this project is to improve treatments for type 1 diabetes via optimization of a closed loop artificial pancreas system by 1) incorporating exercise detection to reduce the risk of hypoglycemia and 2) improving usability by reducing the number of system components.

Components of the bi-hormonal artificial pancreas system: Two Tandem pumps, a Dexcom glucose sensor, and a Nexus smart phone running our control algorithm.

Protocols: A randomized four-way cross-over AP study

Unobtrusive measurement of sleep disordered breathing in the home

Sleep monitor to unobtrusive measurement of sleep disordered breathing in the home..

Grant2R01HL098621-04A1
ProgramNIH National Heart, Blood and Lung Institute (NHLBI)
Principal Investigators: Chad Hagen, Peter Jacobs
Project Start and End Dates: January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2016

Project Summary: The purpose of this project is to use load cells to assess sleep apnea and other sleep disorders passively. Load cell developed to detect respiration and sleep apnea. This sensor gets placed on the rail of a bed frame. We use signal processing and machine learning to translate the sensed signal into an estimation of disordered breathing.

iPancreas: Internet based on-demand artificial pancreas app-generator to accelerate clinical trials research

Grant: 2017 Catalyst Award (Jacobs)
Program: OHSU OCTRI Pilot Award
Principal investigator:Peter G. Jacobs
Project start and end dates: July 1st 2016 – June 30th, 2017. 

Project summary:The objective of this project is to translate the OHSU artificial pancreas (AP) technology for use by other research groups through the creation of iPancreas, an Internet-based on-demand AP app generator.

Position tracking and mobility assessment system for indoor monitoring of elders

Grant2R42AG035400-02A1
ProgramNIH Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR)
Principal Investigator: Eric A. Wan
Co-investigator: Peter Jacobs
Project Start and End Dates: Sept 1 2010 – May 31, 2016

Project Summary: This phase-2 STTR will commercialize a Position Tracking and Mobility Assessment System targeted specifically for elderly patients within their home environment.

RF tech
EmbedRF body-worn tag which includes a time-of-flight radio transceiver (TOF), an inertial measurement unit (IMU) with 3-axis accelerometer, 3-axis gyroscope. Wall-mounted access point shown on the right, which gets placed within the home to remotely assess mobility of a patient.

Comprehensive ototoxicity monitoring program for VA: A randomized trial

Device representing ototoxicity project: Comprehensive ototoxicity monitoring program for VA: A randomized trial

GrantRX000239
ProgramVA Rehabilitation Research and Development Merit Award
Principal Investigators: Marilyn Dille, Dawn Konrad-Martin
Project Start and End Dates: April 1, 2014 to March 31, 2018
Co-Investigator: Peter Jacobs

Project Summary: The proposed study is designed to establish that ototoxicity monitoring when introduced as a comprehensive program of evidence-based protocols will improve Veteran hearing outcomes and quality of life by influencing therapeutic planning and improving access to timely audiological rehabilitation services.

A passive tag-free approach to localization and activity monitoring

GrantETAC-12-239042
ProgramAlzheimer's Association 2012 Everyday Technologies for Alzheimer's Care
Principal Investigators: Eric Wan, Peter Jacobs
Project Start and End Dates: November 1, 2012 to October 1, 2014

Grant:  1R43AG049573 –01A1 (Jacobs, Wan)
Program: NIH/NIA National Institute for aging
Principal investigator: Peter Jacobs
Project start and End Dates: Sept 1 2010 – May 31, 2016
Co-investigator: Michelle Cameron                                                              

Project summary: In-home monitoring system for assessing gait using wall-mounted Radio Frequency transceivers. The objective of this project is to develop new ways of assessing gait using Radio Frequency fingerprinting and RSSI signals.

Project Summary: The objective of this grant is to research and develop a Position Tracking and Mobility Assessment System targeted specifically for monitoring patients with mild cognitive impairment / Alzheimer’s Disease within their home environment.

Mobile monitoring of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy

Mobile monitoring of chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy.

Program: OHSU Pilot Project
Principal InvestigatorKerri M. Winters-Stone
Co-investigator: Peter Jacobs
Project Start and End Dates: Sept 1, 2014-Aug 30 2016

Project Summary: We are developing a mobile phone-based system that could accurately quantify chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy symptoms and functional changes using a smartphone application interface that is easy to administer by a clinician or a non-expert such as by a patient herself and which could be broadly implemented in multiple settings and populations. For the proposed study we want to determine the feasibility and acceptability of the mobile phone system by clinicians, nurses, physical therapists and patients. The feasibility and acceptability data will be used to refine the user interface, data collection protocols, signal processing during a neuropathy test, balance and sway test, and walking test and other preferences and features of the system to maximize utilization potential in the clinic and home settings. We expect that following this feasibility study the system will be ready for near-term, widespread implementation.