MD Program

Camaraderie

“Any questions?” the admissions panel member asked. My hand shot up, “How competitive are your students amongst each other?” Other premed applicants nodded their heads in approval; it was floating around their minds too. If there was ever a question I made sure to ask during interview season, it was that one. Given the swelling number of medical school graduates for an unchanging number of residency slots, the spectre of a premed redux was omnipresent. … Read More

“…just, like, acting like a human.”

“It’s just, like, acting like a human.” A fellow first year medical student eloquently summarized our Principles of Clinical Medicine class. The “techniques” we practice seem basic on first glance: Express the patient’s Chief Complaint in their own words. Ask the patient to describe the Onset of his or her symptom, what Provokes or Palliates it, it’s Quality, and so on and so forth to the tune of a convenient acronym. Explore socioeconomic or psychological … Read More

Dissect

  We first-year medical students had our first lab session a few weeks ago. We gloved up, scrubbed up, and wielded a scalpel – the key to uncovering the secrets hidden below our skin. My team’s donor, an older gentleman who gave his body to the advancement of medical education, lay on his back. He was abnormally frigid and stiff to the touch; his face shrouded with a white cloth to protect his identity. Without … Read More

Medicine, trades, and cuisine in Guatemala

During the first three weeks in Guatemala our days were filled with excursions and cultural conferences. One of the presentations that was particularly interesting was by a comadrona (midwife) who discussed some of the common cultural remedies that are used during the entire birth process; from herbal teas for different stages of labor to comprehensive massages to induce lactation. The presentation gave us a glimpse into how medicine is able to serve entire communities without … Read More

The Godfather

One month in Roatan has felt like a lifetime. I find that when I travel to a new place, the more different the daily life is from my own, the more the experiences stand out in my mind, and therefore the longer each day feels. It makes me think that the richest life of all would be to consistently have new experiences, but that’s a different topic altogether. Suffice it to say that my life … Read More

¡Hola! from Xela, Guatemala!

When exhaustion, brain block, and emotional drainage are all screaming that you need to spend the next 24 hours sitting on the couch staring blankly at a television screen, you need to tell yourself “Si se peude!” (Yes, you can). And that is the only option. The last few days have been a whirlwind of nonstop Go, Go, Go. Each day has blended into the next and I find myself wondering how I got to … Read More

Another day in the life

  My first year of medical school is now behind me forever. I am sitting on an airplane, which, after a 3-hour delay, appears to be getting ready to take off. This plane is heading to Houston, where I will meet five of my friends and classmates, and together we will board a plane to the island of Roatan, Honduras. For the next month I will be in a clinic and on beaches, helping patients … Read More

Don’t forget the days while planning the years

There is only so much you can cram into one day. Only so much you can do in a week. And when the year is over, only so much you can be proud to say you have accomplished and learned. Time constraints are the true enemy. We must all account for time in order to set realistic expectations. Or so I thought… They say “time stops for no man,” but it certainly does for medical … Read More

Anything but Middle-of-the-Road

I can’t believe we have one week left of our first year! I had such high hopes for writing these blog posts as a record of my medical school experience. Somewhere around February, though, when the weather was at its worst and I was caught in the doldrums of staying on top of my work and laundry, it occurred to me that much of this experience is intensely personal… and hard to talk about. When … Read More

It be iddy biddy…

When learning a massive amount of material, it helps to have pneumonics for rote memorization. The crazier the phrase the better. Of course sometimes you remember the wacky phrase but not what it stands for. In our neuroscience class last term, we were specifically told to NOT remember a pneumonic for brain MRI findings that related the age of an intra-parenchymal hemorrhage to the findings on a T1/T2 MRI. But it was just so darn memorable: … Read More

StudentSpeak

StudentSpeak

Ever wondered what life is like as a student at OHSU? What does it take to become a researcher? Just how gross is gross anatomy? Welcome to the blog that answers these – and many other – questions. It’s students writing first-hand about their commitment to careers in science and health care. It’s honest about the challenges as well as the joys. It’s not always pretty. But it is our story. Thank you for sharing it with us. And please, let us know what you think.

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