OHSU

Jennifer M. Loftis, Ph.D.

Jennifer M. Loftis, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Psychiatry, Oregon Health & Science University
Research Scientist, Portland VA Medical Center


Method of Contact:

Portland VA Medical Center, R&D 16
3710 SW US Veterans Hospital Road
Portland, Oregon 97239
loftisj@ohsu.edu
Phone: 503 220-8262 ext. 57155 (office) or ext. 54725 (lab)

Education

BA, Psychology, University of California at Santa Barbara, 1990
BA, Economics, University of California at Santa Barbara, 1990
MA, Psychology, Fairleigh Dickinson University, 1994
PhD, Behavioral Neuroscience, Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU), 2002
Post-doctoral fellowship, Molecular Microbiology & Immunology, OHSU, 2004 - 2007

Curriculum Vitae`

Research

Dr. Jennifer Loftis is a Research Scientist at the Portland VA Medical Center and an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at OHSU.  Her research is focused on investigating the neuroimmunological mechanisms contributing to depression and cognitive impairments, discovering treatment targets, and testing novel interventions for improving depression and neuropsychiatric recovery. Dr. Loftis’ translational research program uses rodent models (e.g., Flinders Sensitive Line rats) and humans to characterize inflammatory pathways involved in cognitive dysfunction and neuropsychiatric symptoms, particularly in patients with a history of substance abuse and hepatitis C viral infection.  Recently, she identified a novel role for cytokines in the development of depressive symptoms in patients with chronic hepatitis C, and this finding has led to the initial testing of hypotheses regarding how circulating inflammatory cytokines affect central nervous system functioning.  Dr. Loftis’ long-term goal as a principal investigator is to expand our understanding of the biochemical and molecular mechanisms associated with neuropsychiatric impairments and CNS inflammation.


Teaching/Mentorship

Dr. Loftis is an active mentor and teacher in the community.  At OHSU, she is a small group facilitator for the Principles of Clinical Medicine course within the School of Medicine, and a mentor for the Partnership for Scientific Inquiry. She also mentors for the STEM Mentor Project and is a member of the Neuroscientist/Teacher Partner Program to educate K-12 children in neuroscience and current research.

Administration/Service

Dr. Loftis balances her research and teaching responsibilities with administrative and community service.  She serves as a member of the Portland VA Medical Center Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC), the Portland VA Medical Center Research & Development Committee, and the OHSU Department of Psychiatry Promotions & Tenure Committee.   

Activities

Research
Education
Administration/Service

Selected Recent Publications

Loftis J.M., Choi D., Hoffman W.F., Huckans M. (in press). Methamphetamine causes persistent immune dysregulation:  A cross-species, translational report. Neurotoxicity Research. Oct 17. [Epub ahead of print]

Anacker, A.M.J., Loftis, J.M., Kaur, S., Ryabinin, A.E. (2010). Prairie voles as a novel model of socially-facilitated excessive drinking. Addiction Biology Jun 23. [Epub ahead of print]

Loftis, J.M., Huckans, M., Morasco, B.J. (2010). Neuroimmune mechanisms of cytokine-induced depression: current theories and novel treatment strategies. Neurobiology of Disease 37(3), pp. 519-33. (invited review).

Hauser, P., Morasco, B.J, Linke, A., Bjornson, D., Ruimy, S., Matthews, A., Rifai, M.A., Indest, D.W. & Loftis, J.M. (2009). Antiviral completion rates and sustained viral response in hepatitis C patients with- versus without- pre-existing major depressive disorder. Psychosomatics 50(5), pp. 500-5.

Loftis, J.M., Huckans, M., Ruimy, S., Hinrichs, D.J., Hauser, P.  (2008). Depressive symptoms in patients with chronic hepatitis C are correlated with elevated plasma levels of interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor-. Neuroscience Letters 430(3):264-8.

Loftis, J.M. and Hauser, P. (2004). Interferon and Depression: A review. Journal of Affective Disorders 82(2), pp.175-190.