About our department

The Department of Medical Informatics & Clinical Epidemiology (DMICE) is one of 27 academic departments in the School of Medicine at Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU). 

The mission of DMICE is to provide leadership, discovery and dissemination of knowledge in clinical informatics, clinical epidemiology, and bioinformatics / computational biology. This mission is fulfilled through programs of research, education, and service.

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Recent publications

March 2017

Identification of Hip BMD Loss and Fracture Risk Markers Through Population-Based Serum Proteomics.

Identification of Interleukin-1 by Functional Screening as a Key Mediator of Cellular Expansion and Disease Progression in Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

Implementation of Recovery Programming on an Inpatient Acute Psychiatric Unit and Its Impact on Readmission.

Use of patient decision aids increased younger women's reluctance to begin screening mammography: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Bedside Back to Bench: Building Bridges between Basic and Clinical Genomic Research.

Screening for Celiac Disease: Evidence Report and Systematic Review for the US Preventive Services Task Force.

January 2017

REST corepressors RCOR1 and RCOR2 and the repressor INSM1 regulate the proliferation-differentiation balance in the developing brain.

Effects of selection for ethanol preference on gene expression in the nucleus accumbens of HS-CC mice.

A microRNA screen identifies the Wnt signaling pathway as a regulator of the interferon response during flavivirus infection.

Does Articaine Provide an Advantage over Lidocaine in Patients with Symptomatic Irreversible Pulpitis? A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

Bayesian Network Inference Modeling Identifies TRIB1 as a Novel Regulator of Cell-Cycle Progression and Survival in Cancer Cells.

Understanding the value of mixed methods research: the Children's Safety Initiative-Emergency Medical Services.

Predictive Utility of the Total Glasgow Coma Scale Versus the Motor Component of the Glasgow Coma Scale for Identification of Patients With Serious Traumatic Injuries.

December 2016

Intravesical Therapy for the Treatment of Non-Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

Primary Care-Based Models for the Treatment of Opioid Use Disorder: A Scoping Review.

Statins for Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease in Adults: Evidence Report and Systematic Review for the US Preventive Services Task Force.

Management of Postoperative Pain: A Clinical Practice Guideline From the American Pain Society, the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, and the American Society of Anesthesiologists' Committee on Regional Anesthesia, Executive Committee, and Administrative Council.

Research Gaps in Practice Guidelines for Acute Postoperative Pain Management in Adults: Findings From a Review of the Evidence for an American Pain Society Clinical Practice Guideline.

The Association Between Hospital Capacity Strain and Inpatient Outcomes in Highly Developed Countries: A Systematic Review.

Vaginal birth after cesarean: neonatal outcomes and United States birth setting.


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Blog: Health Data, Information and Action

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DMICE students win AMIA student design challenge for second consecutive year

A team of clinical informatics students from the biomedical informatics program at Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) has won the 2015 student design challenge of the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA). The winner was announced on November 18, 2015, at the AMIA Annual Symposium, held in San Francisco, CA.

Two teams of students in the Department of Medical Informatics and Clinical Epidemiology (DMICE) biomedical informatics program made it to the “final four” in the competition, which had the theme, “The Human Side of Big Data – Facilitating Human-Data Interaction.”

The team that took first place presented “Learning from the Data: Exploring a Hepatocellular Carcinoma Registry Using Visual Analytics to Improve Multidisciplinary Clinical Decision-Making." Team members include Michelle Hribar, Ph.D., L. Nelson Sanchez-Pinto, M.D., Kate Fultz Hollis, M.S., Gene Ren, and Deborah Woodcock, M.B.A.

The second student team from OHSU, which took honorable mention (fourth place), was comprised of bioinformatics students Ashley Choi, Benjamin Cordier, Prerna Das, Ph.D., and Jason Li, M.S. They presented “Take a Breather: Empowering Adherence and Patient Centered Research through Interactive Data Visualization, Social Engagement, and Gamification in Patients with Sleep Apnea.”

Both teams presented posters at the AMIA Symposium on November 16 and, as finalists, gave oral presentations on November 17, 2015. In 2014, the one OHSU team that entered the Student Design Challenge took first place with its prototype of a mobile app that captures children’s drawing and accompanying narratives to better facilitate child-provider communication. Fultz Hollis, Hribar and Woodcock were on both the 2014 and 2015 teams that took first place.

Hribar was funded by a training grant to OHSU from the National Library of Medicine.