Photo of Gail Mandel, Ph.D.

Gail Mandel Ph.D.

  •      (503) 494-3784
    • Professor Vollum Institute
    • Senior Scientist Vollum Institute
    • Neuroscience Graduate Program School of Medicine
    • Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Graduate Program School of Medicine

Gail Mandel is senior scientist at the Vollum Institute and a professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at OHSU. A valley girl at heart, she received her Ph.D. in Immunology from the University of California, Los Angeles, four years after receiving her B.A. in Biology. Mandel did her postdoctoral training at UCLA and the University of California, San Diego. She was an instructor in the Department of Pathology at Harvard Medical School for two years before joining Molecular Medicine at Tufts-New England Medical Center. In 1989, Mandel was promoted to associate professor in the Department of Neurobiology & Behavior at Stony Brook University and advanced to the rank of distinguished professor before joining the Vollum Institute in 2006. She was an HHMI Investigator from 1997 to 2016.

Research in the Mandel Lab is focused on understanding how neuronal cell identity is established and maintained. Most recently, the lab uncovered a role for glia in inducing neuronal dysfunction in Rett Syndrome, one of the most common causes of mental retardation in young girls.

Areas of interest

  • Rett Syndrome
  • neuronal-glial interactions
  • microRNA
  • epigenetics
  • neurogenesis
  • neuronal circuitry
  • neurodevelopment

Education

  • B.S., University of California, Los Angeles 1972
  • Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles 1977

Honors and awards

  • Jacob J. Javits Neuroscience Investigator Award, NINDS, NIH (1997-2004)
  • Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute (1997-2016)
  • Elected member, National Academy of Sciences (2008)
  • Discovery Award, Medical Research Foundation of Oregon (2011)
  • NIH Transformative Research Award (2013-2018)
  • Councilor, Society for Neuroscience (2017-2021)

Publications

  • "Astrocytic modulation of excitatory synaptic signaling in a mouse model of Rett syndrome." eLife  In: , Vol. 7, e31629, 09.01.2018.
  • "Site-directed RNA repair of endogenous Mecp2 RNA in neurons." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America  In: , Vol. 114, No. 44, 31.10.2017, p. E9395-E9402.
  • "REST corepressors RCOR1 and RCOR2 and the repressor INSM1 regulate the proliferation- differentiation balance in the developing brain." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America  In: , Vol. 114, No. 3, 17.01.2017, p. E406-E415.
  • "Acute and crucial requirement for MeCP2 function upon transition from early to late adult stages of brain maturation." Human Molecular Genetics  In: , Vol. 25, No. 9, ddw038, 01.05.2016, p. 1690-1702.
  • "Nonequivalent release sites govern synaptic depression." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America  In: , Vol. 113, No. 3, 19.01.2016, p. E378-E386.
  • "The REST remodeling complex protects genomic integrity during embryonic neurogenesis." eLife  In: , Vol. 5, No. JANUARY2016, e09584, 08.01.2016.
  • "The corepressor Rcor1 is essential for normal myeloerythroid lineage differentiation." Stem Cells In: , Vol. 33, No. 11, 01.11.2015, p. 3304-3314.
  • "A High-Resolution Imaging Approach to Investigate Chromatin Architecture in Complex Tissues." Cell  In: , Vol. 163, No. 1, 24.09.2015, p. 246-255.
  • "An RNA binding protein promotes axonal integrity in peripheral neurons by destabilizing REST." Journal of Neuroscience  In: , Vol. 34, No. 50, 10.12.2014, p. 16650-16661.
  • "C-terminal domain small phosphatase 1 and MAP kinase reciprocally control REST stability and neuronal differentiation." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America  In: , Vol. 111, No. 37, 16.09.2014, p. E3929-E3936.
  • "Corepressor Rcor1 is essential for murine erythropoiesis." Blood  In: , Vol. 123, No. 20, 15.05.2014, p. 3175-3184.
  • "Polycomb- and REST-associated histone deacetylases are independent pathways toward a mature neuronal phenotype." eLife  In: , Vol. 3, 2014, p. e04235.
  • "Synchronous and asynchronous modes of synaptic transmission utilize different calcium sources." eLife  In: , Vol. 2013, No. 2, e01206, 24.12.2013.
  • "Zebrafish calls for reinterpretation for the roles of P/Q calcium channels in neuromuscular transmission." Journal of Neuroscience  In: , Vol. 33, No. 17, 24.04.2013, p. 7384-7392.
  • "Corepressor-dependent silencing of fetal hemoglobin expression by BCL11A." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America In: , Vol. 110, No. 16, 16.04.2013, p. 6518-6523.
  • "Systemic delivery of MeCP2 rescues behavioral and cellular deficits in female mouse models of Rett syndrome." Journal of Neuroscience  In: , Vol. 33, No. 34, 2013, p. 13612-13620.
  • "Oligodendrocyte lineage cells contribute unique features to rett syndrome neuropathology." Journal of Neuroscience  In: , Vol. 33, No. 48, 2013, p. 18764-18774.
  • "Zebrafish model for congenital myasthenic syndrome reveals mechanisms causal to developmental recovery." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America  In: , Vol. 109, No. 43, 23.10.2012, p. 17711-17716.
  • "Astrocytes conspire with neurons during progression of neurological disease." Current Opinion in Neurobiology  In: , Vol. 22, No. 5, 10.2012, p. 850-858.
  • "MeCP2 is critical for maintaining mature neuronal networks and global brain anatomy during late stages of postnatal brain development and in the mature adult brain." Journal of Neuroscience  In: , Vol. 32, No. 29, 18.07.2012, p. 10021-10034.
  • "Acetylcholine receptor gating in a zebrafish model for slow-channel syndrome." Journal of Neuroscience  In: , Vol. 32, No. 23, 06.06.2012, p. 7941-7948.
  • "Repressor element 1 silencing transcription factor (REST) controls radial migration and temporal neuronal specification during neocortical development." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America  In: , Vol. 108, No. 40, 04.10.2011, p. 16789-16794.
  • "An acetylcholine receptor lacking both γ and ε subunits mediates transmission in zebrafish slow muscle synapses." Journal of General Physiology  In: , Vol. 138, No. 3, 09.2011, p. 353-366.
  • "A role for glia in the progression of Rett-syndrome." Nature  In: , Vol. 475, No. 7357, 28.07.2011, p. 497-500.
  • "MicroRNA-132 regulates dendritic growth and arborization of newborn neurons in the adult hippocampus." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America In: , Vol. 107, No. 47, 23.11.2010, p. 20382-20387.
  • "Distinct roles for two synaptotagmin isoforms in synchronous and asynchronous transmitter release at zebrafish neuromuscular junction." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America  In: , Vol. 107, No. 31, 03.08.2010, p. 13906-13911.
  • "Non-cell autonomous influence of MeCP2-deficient glia on neuronal dendritic morphology." Nature Neuroscience  In: , Vol. 12, No. 3, 03.2009, p. 311-317.
  • "Synaptic homeostasis in a zebrafish glial glycine transporter mutant." Journal of Neurophysiology In: , Vol. 100, No. 4, 10.2008, p. 1716-1723.
  • "A biochemical approach to identifying microRNA targets." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America In: , Vol. 104, No. 49, 04.12.2007, p. 19291-19296.
  • "Homeostatic regulation of MeCP2 expression by a CREB-induced microRNA." Nature Neuroscience In: , Vol. 10, No. 12, 12.2007, p. 1513-1514.

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