Featured Story

OHSU researchers open new field in cellular metabolism

In a paper published in Science in June, 2016, a team of OHSU authors reveal key insights into the role of NAD+, a coenzyme found in every cell, helping to drive glucose metabolism. NAD+ was discovered about 100 years ago, and its dysregulation is known to play a role in aging and disease, but we still don't know much about how it is regulated in cells or tissues. The authors describe a new fluorescent biosensor that allows direct measurement of free NAD+ concentrations in live cells—in essence, opening an entirely new field. Read more.

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In the Spotlight

A cure for HIV: How does it work?

drlouispickerFor 15 years, Louis Picker, M.D., has been working on a vaccine to stop the spread of HIV, which affects more than 35 million people worldwide. The vaccine has proven effective in primate studies, and the next step is testing it on humans. With clinical trials set to start in 2016, Dr. Picker is moving full-steam ahead to stop the devastating disease from taking more lives. But how does the vaccine work? This video explains.