Scientific Advisory Board

MARC SCIENTIFIC ADVISORY BOARD

The MARC has assembled a group of distinguished researchers in addictions science, neurobiology, and neuroimmunology to serve as our scientific advisory board (SAB). The group meets periodically with our investigators, reviews progress reports, and helps evaluate our pilot-project applications. In addition, SAB members may be asked to advise individual members of the MARC as specific issues arise.

 

Our Advisors:

Dennis Bourdette, M.D.

Dennis Bourdette, M.D.

Oregon Health & Science University

Dr. Bourdette is Chair and Roy & Eulalia Swank Family Research Professor with OHSU's Department of Neurology as well as director of the Multiple Sclerosis Center of Oregon. His research interests include the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis and development of new treatment approaches for the disease.

John Marshall, Ph.D.

John Marshall, Ph.D.

University of California at Irvine

Dr. Marshall's work includes research on brain recovery following injury, cellular factors contributing to neurodegeneration, organization of basal ganglia motor systems, and computer-assisted quantitative localization of transmitter receptors in the central nervous system.

Martin Paulus, M.D.

Martin Paulus, M.D.

University of California at San Diego

Dr. Paulus' work focuses on how decision-making dysfunctions contribute to the transition from casual use of drugs to dependence and how these dysfunctions contribute to relapse in individuals with stimulant dependence.

Terry Robinson, Ph.D.

Terry Robinson, Ph.D.

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Dr. Robinson's research interests include neuropsychopharmacology; neurobiology of addiction; long-term effects of psychomotor stimulant drugs and stress on brain and behavior; neural adaptations to brain damage; and brain dopamine systems.

John Williams, Ph.D.

John Williams, Ph.D.

Vollum Institute for Advanced Biomedical Research

Dr. Williams is an authority on the responses of neuronal systems to abused drugs, measured using electrophysiological methods. He and his colleagues investigate the early events that lead to the development of tolerance to opioids.

Bryan Yamamoto, Ph.D.

Bryan Yamamoto, Ph.D.

University of Toledo

Dr. Yamamoto's primary research interests lie in neuropharmacology, neurodegeneration, and the neurotoxicity of the amphetamines. The overall hypothesis is that the amphetamines, through the enhanced release of dopamine and glutamate, promote excitotoxicity, free-radical mediated oxidative stress, and produce a compromised bioenergetic state that damage dopamine and 5HT neurons. 

Nancy Zahniser, Ph.D.

Nancy Zahniser, Ph.D.

University of Colorado Medical Center

Dr. Zahniser researches the interactions of abused drugs with aminergic transporters and the disposition of neurotransmitters.