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Rural Clinics

Directories of Rural Clinics

For a directory of Oregon's Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs), please visit the Oregon Primary Care Association's website.

For a directory of Oregon's Rural Health Clinics (RHCs), please visit our listing. Further information regarding RHCs can be found below and on subsequent pages within this section.

Oregon's RHC Reports

2011 RHC Report

The Oregon Office of Rural Health & O-HITEC announce the release of the 2011 Oregon Federally Certified Rural Health Clinics Report. Funded by a grant from O-HITEC, this is a comprehensive report on the Certified Rural Health Clinics in Oregon.

Special thanks go to the staffs of the Oregon Rural Practice‐based Research Network (ORPRN), and the Oregon Department of Medical Assistance Programs (DMAP) who helped collect and disseminate clinic data for this report.

2008 RHC Report

The Oregon Office of Rural Health & the Oregon Rural Health Association announce the release of the 2008 Oregon Federally Certified Rural Health Clinics Report. Funded by a grant from the Meyer Memorial Trust, this is a comprehensive report on the Certified Rural Health Clinics in Oregon.

Map and List of Rural Health Clinics

What is a Rural Health Clinic?

Rural Health Clinics (RHCs) were established by Public Law 95-210, the Rural Health Clinic Service Act, in 1977. The purpose of RHCs is to increase primary care services for Medicaid and Medicare patients in rural communities. RHCs ownership/governance structure can operate as public, private, or non-profit. The main requirements to obtain RHC status include:

  • Clinic is NOT located in an "Urbanized Area" as designated by the U.S. Census Bureau. Clinic is Designated by the Secretary of Health and Human Services as a Health Professional Shortage Area (HPSA), or Medically Underserved Area (MUA), generally determined by information from the State Health Department.
  • The clinic must employ a mid-level practitioner at least 50% of the time the RHC operates. Examples include a physician assistant, certified nurse mid-wife, or nurse practitioner.
  • Must provide outpatient primary care.
  • Clinic must be under the medical direction of a physician who must be on site at least once every two weeks.
  • Must provide six basic lab tests on site.
  • Must be clean and handicapped accessible.
  • Must have a current and applicable policy procedures manual.
  • Drugs and samples stored safely.
  • Adequate medical records must be maintained for six years.

The main advantage of attaining RHC status is to receive enhanced reimbursement rates for providing Medicaid and Medicare services in rural areas. The disadvantage can sometimes be the delay of obtaining funding, a lack of understanding of the RHC program by fiscal intermediaries, States, and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS)

Still have questions about the requirements to be a Rural Health Clinic? Take a look at some additional Rural Health Clinic Information prepared by the ORH and Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS).

The Governor's designation qualifies new locations for Rural Health Clinic Status. Learn more and view a map about area qualifications.

If you are interested in RHC status you should contact: