News and Events

Most snakebites occur when people accidentally step on or come across a snake, frightening it and causing it to bite defensively. However, by taking extra precaution in snake-prone environments, many of these bites are preventable  by using the following snakebite prevention tips:

  • Avoid surprise encounters with snakes: Snakes tend to be active at night and in warm weather. They tend to hide in places where they are not readily visible, so stay away from places you think a snake may be hiding. Exercise even more caution at night, make sure to bring a flashlight.
  •  Wear protective clothing: Wear loose, long pants and high, thick leather or rubber boots when spending time in places where snakes may be hiding. Wear leather gloves when handling brush and debris.
  • Never touch or handle a snake: Never handle a snake, even if you think it is dead or nonvenomous. Recently dead snakes may still bite by reflex.
  • Bring a partner: If you are planning to spend time in a snake-prone area, bring someone with you. If you must go alone, make sure you bring a fully charged cell phone, and try to stay wherever your phone gets a signal.
  • If you encounter a snake, back away slowly.

how prevent snakebites

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Your Best Snake Bite Prevention Kit:

WHAT TO DO IF YOU ARE BITTEN BY A SNAKE:

  • Do not panic; keep still and calm.
  • Back away slowly from the snake.
  • Call the poison center immediately by dialing the national, free Poison Help number 1 (800) 222-1222. The experts at the poison center have beenspecially trained to treat snakebites. Every snakebite is different, and the poison center specialist will tell you what you need to do next, this could include advising you to go to the ER.
  • If the person who was bitten is having trouble breathing or losing consciousness, call 911 immediately.
  • If you are in a remote location and do not have mobile phone service, ask someone to drive you to the nearest emergency medical facility.Only drive yourself as a last resort. Call Poison Help at 1 (800) 222-1222 as soon as you have telephone service.
  • Keep the part of your body that was bitten straight and at heart-level, unless told otherwise by the specialist at the poison center.
  • Remove all jewelry and tight clothing.
  • Wash the bite with soap and water and cover the bite with a clean dry dressing, if available, and if doing so does not cause delay.
  • Note the time the bite happened.

DO NOT DO THE FOLLOWING:

  • Do not pick up, attempt to trap, or kill the snake.
  • Do not apply a tourniquet or attempt to restrict blood flow to the affected area. 
  • Do not cut the wound.
  • Do not attempt to suck out the venom.
  • Do not apply heat,cold, electricity, or any substances to the wound.
  • Do not drink alcohol or caffeinated beverages or take any drugs or medicines.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Help us promote National Poison Prevention Week (NPPW) 2017! Here is how:

  • Take our Poistex to save poison control numberon Prevention Training. Take our online training, it's 100 % free and you can complete it online. Once you finish, you will have access to a useful resource library. Check out the training: poisontraining.ohsu.edu 
  • Pledge to Save the Poison Control Number on your phone & share it. The most important tool we have to help combat poisoning is the National Poison Help phone number 1-800-222-1222. Help us spread the word by encouraging others to save the number.  Text to Save Campaign.
  • Donate to your local Poison Center. If you or a loved one has ever called the Poison Help line, please consider investing in your local Poison Center. Please take a few minutes during #NPPW17 to donate to the Oregon Poison Center. You can safely do so here.

Daily themes: (March 19-25)

Monday, March 20: Children Act fast, So Do Poisons

Tuesday, March 21: Poison Centers, saving you time and money

Wednesday, March 22: Poisonings Span a Lifetime

Thursday, March 23: Home Safe Home 

Friday, March 24 : Medication Safety

For more information regarding NPPW17, you may contact Fiorella Carhuaz, our public educator, at 503-494-2196.

 fiorella educator