What to Expect

An MRI may be performed on an outpatient basis, or as part of inpatient care. Although each facility may have specific protocols in place, generally, an MRI procedure follows this process:

  1. Because of the strong magnetic field, the patient must remove all jewelry and metal objects, such as hairpins or barrettes, hearing aids, eyeglasses, and dental pieces.
  2. If a contrast medication and/or sedative are to be given by an intravenous line (IV), an IV line will be started in the hand or arm. If the contrast is to be taken by mouth, the patient will be given the contrast to swallow.
  3. The patient will lie on a table that slides into a tunnel in the scanner.
  4. The MRI staff will be in another room where the scanner controls are located. However, the patient will be in constant sight of the staff through a window. Speakers inside the scanner will enable the staff to communicate with and hear the patient. The patient will have a call bell so that he or she can let the staff know if he or she has any problems during the procedure.
  5. During the scanning process, a clicking noise will sound as the magnetic field is created and pulses of radio waves are sent from the scanner. The patient may be given headphones to wear to help block out the noises from the MRI scanner and hear any messages or instructions from the technologist.
  6. It is important that the patient remain very still during the examination.
  7. At intervals, the patient may be instructed to hold his or her breath, or to not breathe, for a few seconds, depending on the body part being examined. The patient will then be told when he or she can breathe. The patient should not have to hold his or her breath for longer than a few seconds, so this should not be uncomfortable.
  8. The technologist will be watching the patient at all times and will be in constant communication.