About our department

The Department of Medical Informatics & Clinical Epidemiology (DMICE) is one of 27 academic departments in the School of Medicine at Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU). 

The mission of DMICE is to provide leadership, discovery and dissemination of knowledge in clinical informatics, clinical epidemiology, and bioinformatics / computational biology. This mission is fulfilled through programs of research, education, and service.

More Information

Recent publications

August 2016

Does the Urinary Microbiome Play a Role in Urgency Urinary Incontinence and Its Severity?

Nitrofurantoin vs other prophylactic agents in reducing recurrent urinary tract infections in adult women: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

User survey finds rapid evidence reviews increased uptake of evidence by Veterans Health Administration leadership to inform fast-paced health-system decision-making.

The Resource Identification Initiative: A Cultural Shift in Publishing.

Navigating the Phenotype Frontier: The Monarch Initiative.

A Whole-Genome Analysis Framework for Effective Identification of Pathogenic Regulatory Variants in Mendelian Disease.

Team Mentoring for Interdisciplinary Team Science: Lessons From K12 Scholars and Directors.

2015 Updated Method Guideline for Systematic Reviews in the Cochrane Back and Neck Group.

Are current standards of reporting quality for clinical trials sufficient in addressing important sources of bias?

July 2016

Muscle Logic: New Knowledge Resource for Anatomy Enables Comprehensive Searches of the Literature on the Feeding Muscles of Mammals.

Consequences of Increasing Time to Colonoscopy Examination After Positive Result From Fecal Colorectal Cancer Screening Test.

Disease insights through cross-species phenotype comparisons.

Reproducibility and conflicts in immune epitope data.

The Cell Ontology 2016: enhanced content, modularization, and ontology interoperability.

Paramedic assessment and treatment of upper airway obstruction in pediatric patients: an exploratory analysis by the Children's Safety Initiative-Emergency Medical Services.

Emergency Medical Services Provider Pediatric Adverse Event Rate Varies by Call Origin Pediatric Emergency Care.

Treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer: A systematic review.

June 2016

Mammography Screening and Overdiagnosis.

Screening for Syphilis: Updated Evidence Report and Systematic Review for the US Preventive Services Task Force.

Evaluation of 12 strategies for obtaining second opinions to improve interpretation of breast histopathology: simulation study.

Gene set analysis: A step-by-step guide.

Identification and Characterization of Tyrosine Kinase Nonreceptor 2 Mutations in Leukemia through Integration of Kinase Inhibitor Screening and Genomic Analysis.

Implementation of Recovery Programming on an Inpatient Acute Psychiatric Unit and Its Impact on Readmission.

PhenomeCentral: a portal for phenotypic and genotypic matchmaking of patients with rare genetic diseases.

Use of model organism and disease databases to support matchmaking for human disease gene discovery.

The Matchmaker Exchange: a platform for rare disease gene discovery.

Proceedings of a Sickle Cell Disease Ontology workshop - Towards the first comprehensive ontology for Sickle Cell Disease.

Twelve recommendations for integrating existing systematic reviews into new reviews: EPC guidance.

Interventions to reduce childhood antibiotic prescribing for upper respiratory infections: systematic review and meta-analysis.


What's new?

DMICE Students Win AMIA Student Design Challenge for Second Consecutive Year

A team of clinical informatics students from the biomedical informatics program at Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) has won the 2015 student design challenge of the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA). The winner was announced on November 18, 2015, at the AMIA Annual Symposium, held in San Francisco, CA.

Two teams of students in the Department of Medical Informatics and Clinical Epidemiology (DMICE) biomedical informatics program made it to the “final four” in the competition, which had the theme, “The Human Side of Big Data – Facilitating Human-Data Interaction.”

The team that took first place presented “Learning from the Data: Exploring a Hepatocellular Carcinoma Registry Using Visual Analytics to Improve Multidisciplinary Clinical Decision-Making." Team members include Michelle Hribar, Ph.D., L. Nelson Sanchez-Pinto, M.D., Kate Fultz Hollis, M.S., Gene Ren, and Deborah Woodcock, M.B.A.

The second student team from OHSU, which took honorable mention (fourth place), was comprised of bioinformatics students Ashley Choi, Benjamin Cordier, Prerna Das, Ph.D., and Jason Li, M.S. They presented “Take a Breather: Empowering Adherence and Patient Centered Research through Interactive Data Visualization, Social Engagement, and Gamification in Patients with Sleep Apnea.”

Both teams presented posters at the AMIA Symposium on November 16 and, as finalists, gave oral presentations on November 17, 2015. In 2014, the one OHSU team that entered the Student Design Challenge took first place with its prototype of a mobile app that captures children’s drawing and accompanying narratives to better facilitate child-provider communication. Fultz Hollis, Hribar and Woodcock were on both the 2014 and 2015 teams that took first place.

Hribar was funded by a training grant to OHSU from the National Library of Medicine.

Connect With Connect with DMICE