OHSU

MS1-MS2 Electives

 
 

Community Service -MIKE Program

9155 SW Barnes Road, Suite 219 (Inside Prov/St. Vincent Hospital, East Pavilion)  

JCON 707A  | MS1-MS2 Electives  | 2 credit(s) | Sept-May  | Full Year term
Preqs: none 

Schedule and Time Commitment: -15 hours pre-placement orientation, interview, training -3 hours per week when youth projects are meeting, which includes information transfer/travel/mentoring/weekly briefing or de-briefing. One semester projects meet for up to 18 weeks. Two semester projects meet for up to 36 weeks. Typically there are one to four weeks when the projects don’t meet, because of assemblies or other one-off activities, throughout the school year, though this is variable. -~3 hours additionally for one or two session during times field trips are scheduled (optional though highly encouraged) -2 hours to participate in community outreach with youth (Martin Luther King Day Breakfast) if applicable (optional, though encouraged) -Booster training sessions, up to 2 hours a semester (optional, though highly encouraged) Course Activities: MIKE Program’s curriculum, is a comprehensive adolescent health education curriculum addressing nine strands and weaving all eight health education standards throughout the experience. Each student will be expected to: Submit an initial interest statement (on-line); Undertake a30-60 minute introduction/orientation session (didactic/Q & A); Undertake an intake interview (can be part of initial meeting); Submit adequate proof of back-ground checks or undertake additional finger- print background check (can be part of initial meeting); Complete paperwork (photo release, confidentiality statement, release-of- information, personal photo-identification (can be part of initial meeting); Undertake 12-15 hour training (over two days, usually a weekend, or it can be stretched over a longer period of time to fit in with medical students’ schedules) which includes didactic and multiple hands-on activities which are an introduction to team environment, systems theory, health belief model, purpose of MIKE Program’s adolescent health education curriculum, facets of specific adolescent health education curriculum activities, the role of mentors and mentoring, how their participation in MIKE Program promotes the 40 developmental assets and engaged learning; trauma and attachment; project- based learning and group behavior; Undertake an on-line training (~45 minutes) covering aspects of nutrition, sustainable food practices, and food safety in order to prepare snacks for youth; Undertake training in recognizing sexual predatory behavior and reporting/management (~2 hours, done with MIKE Program mentor training); Prepare for and participate as a mentor for a cluster of 3-6 (typically 4) teenagers in their health, life-sciences or after-school credit recovery or agency setting. Learning Objectives: 1. Elicit a personal history from low-income, racial/ethnically diverse youth 2. Communicate effectively with racially/ethnically diverse adolescents, supporting the teens’ development and behavior management in multiple community settings 3. Perform effectively as a team member in community settings with those from other disciplines or interprofessional backgrounds [education/public health/community health/dietetics/dialysis providers/social work/not-for-profit community organization (NGO)/Physician’s Assistants/ Nurse] in order to understand and work within the broader social and environmental contexts which influence disease prevention and health promotion 4. Demonstrate basics of physiology which underpin health promotion and disease prevention using hands-on tools in order to build therapeutic relationships and establish the educative process of shared decision making 5. Identify, obtain, and prepare portion-controlled, healthy snacks on a tight budget for ~two dozen teenagers 6. Understand: Epigenetic Principle of the Lifecycle Theory (the foundation for each step along the path to maturity is laid by the conditions and events that precede it), Health Belief Model, Systems Theory, 40 Developmental Assets, Project-Based Learning, Youth Development Assessments: Reflection Paper, Direct Observation and report by MIKE Program, Mentee (protégé) feedback, Student feedback weekly debriefing and/or at other small group sessions Final Grade: Pass/No Pass  

Conversations In Global Health

OHSU Portland 

GLBH 712  | MS1-MS2 Electives  | 1 credit(s) | full year  | Full Year term
Preqs: none 

Registration in Fall only; Seminar runs during Fall, Winter, and Spring terms: 2-3 Wednesdays per month, 12:10 to 12:50PM. Attendance: minimum of 12 sessions throughout the academic year required to receive one hour of elective credit. Grade issued in Spring. Assignment: record personal reflections during seminar. To expand awareness and dialogue among OHSU students, faculty, and guests about a wide range of contemporary scholarly and real-life global health issues facing our world. We will explore the complex matrix of social, political, historic, economic, ethical, cultural, environmental, and pathological factors that influence disease, health, and well-being, whether global or local. Learning Objectives: 1. Learn about current events, disaster response, health interventions, civil society development, non-governmental organizations, research endeavors, and public health as seen through eyes and ears of guest multidisciplinary speakers. 2. Interact with a wide range of global health practitioners. 3. Discern epidemiological or population-based efforts, policies, and priorities to reduce burdens of disease, mortality, and disability among various population groups. 4. Recognize inherent difficulties in conducting quality research, creating policies, or implementing interventions to improve health in lower resource countries. 5. Consider whether presenters have applied the framework of the United Nations Millennium Goals to examine a wide range of health challenges. 6. Identify complexities influencing the delivery of health services regardless of the setting. 7. Discover interrelationships among various ecological factors, public policy (economics and politics) and disease. 8. Appreciate the challenges and rewards of inquiry, service, education and interventions directed at solving intractable problems in the global environment.  

Curriculum Transformation Elective

OHSU Portland 

JCON 705U  | MS1-MS2 Electives  | 1 credit(s) | one term  | Spring 2014 term
Preqs: current MS2 with demonstrated interests in the curriculum transformation initiative 

This course requires the prior approval of the Associate Dean of Undergraduate Medical Education. Students in this elective course will serve as student advisors working closely with the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Medical Education and the Curriculum Transformation Development team comprised of basic science and clinical faculty members, educators, and staff. The student will provide input and feedback on the case based curriculum as it is being developed and serve as a participant/consultant in faculty development sessions. The student will be expected to attend meetings as follows: *Wednesdays 1x per week 3-5pm (2 hr) *Mondays every other week 1-2pm (1 hr) The student is also expected to spend up to two hours weekly (of their own time) reviewing case based curriculum as it is developed and passed along via email. *Specific dates will be provided upon course enrollment. The total time commitment for this elective is approximately 40 hours. Objectives: After completing this elective, the student will be able to . . . • Analyze case based curricula • Assess overall effectiveness of each case • Identify gaps and redundancies within curriculum • Provide feedback and offer input to basic science and clinical faculty in regards to case structure • Generate ideas regarding teaching methods Method of Evaluation: • Attendance/Participation • Series of short answers for feedback purposes • Grading will be pass-fail 

Developing Musculosketal Research

OHSU Portland 

ORTH 705C  | MS1-MS2 Electives  | 1 credit(s) | 11 weeks  | Spring term
Preqs: ORTH 705A and ORTH 705B or Instructor Consent 

- Week 1– Evaluating the Literature - Week 2– Mentor - Week 3– Developing Hypothesis/ Introduction to Study Design - Week 4 – Mentor - Week 5 – Introduction to Quantitative Methods - Week 6 – Data Collection - Week 7 Ethical Issues in Research - Week 8 – Mentor - Week 9 – Data Analysis - Week 10– Mentor - Week 11– Written Research Proposal Presentation 

Diagnostic Imaging and Medical Uncertainty

OHSU Portland 

RADD 705A  | MS1-MS2 Electives  | 1 credit(s) | 13 weeks  | TBA term
Preqs: none 

In the medical school preclinical years, due emphasis is placed on understanding tissue pathology and its utility as a diagnostic tool. Less attention is paid to other diagnostic modalities that, along with good history-taking and physical exam skills, frequently contribute to medical decision making. This course seeks to provide an introduction to some of the most commonly utilized imaging modalities such as ultrasound, radiography, and CT/MRI. The course is modeled after the style of learning that occurs on clinical rotations and emphasizes student to student teaching.The elective would meet on a weekly basis for 1 hour per session. The first 30-35 minutes would consist of the presentation of an approach to a commonly used modality (i.e., ultrasound). Emphasis would be placed on giving students the opportunity to practice the skills they acquire in each session by re-visiting topics after they are presented. For example, for each session after the "Approach to the Bone Radiograph" presentation, a bone radiograph will be presented and students given the chance to practice basic interpretation. The remainder of in-class time would involve a presentation on evidence-based medicine given by a junior student on a topic of his or her choice. This gives students the opportunity to investigate the data supporting medical points-of-view that are commonly accepted (i.e., "What is the data supporting daily aspirin as primary prevention for cardiac death?"'What is the evidence supporting SSRIs in the treatment of depression?"). To further highlight the contrast between the known and the unknown in medicine, students will be expected to attend two conferences outside of classroom time. One of the sessions must be a Grand Rounds-type presentation in the department/setting of the students' choosing. The second must deal specifically with uncertainty and can be fulfilled by attendance to either a Morbidity and Mortality (M&M) conference or a Tumor Board Conference, again in the department/discipline of the students' choosing. Finally, at the end of the course there will be an afternoon-long discussion opportunity where principles will be reviewed and cases will be presented for students to practice their acquired skills. 

Emergency Services

OHSU Portland 

EMED 705J  | MS1-MS2 Electives  | 1 credit(s) | 7 weeks  | Summer term
Preqs: MS1 

AIMS (Purpose or Rationale) This three shift rotation is an introduction to emergency field medicine for students in the first and second years of medical school at Oregon Health and Sciences University. Students will be introduced to the core skills(CPR, Cardiac monitoring/defibrillation, cardiac pacing, endotracheal intubation, IV/IO placement, spinal immobilization, extremity splinting, pleural needle decompression, emergent tracheostomy, etc.), medications used by paramedics, and how emergency medical services function as a team from pre-arrival at an emergency response location to delivery of the patient to the emergency department. The focus of instruction will be assessment from direct observation of patients suffering from life threatening emergencies. This elective incorporates ride along experiences with ambulance and fire based emergency medical service providers in addition to classroom experiences on the campus of OHSU. The elective will be limited to [X amount] students. This elective is designed as an introduction to emergency medical response through observation. It is not designed for the medical student to provide treatment to patients in the field. LEARNING GOAL(S) The learning goals are designed to stimulate a dialog between the medical students and the emergency responders so the student can gain insight into the purpose, capabilities, decision making, and the level of patient care that the these personnel provide. Additional objectives are designed to reinforce concepts from the medical curriculum including anatomy, mental status exams, and the necessity of interprofessional collaboration in team based care for effective emergency response. The student is expected to answer each objective to demonstrate knowledge which was gained. Sample Objectives Check Off Sheet for Ride Alongs American Medical Response • What is the response area for the ambulance service? • How does this vary from the fire based response in Multnomah County? • Describe the lead/junior paramedic system and why is it instituted. Is this a common practice through the state and country? How does the scope of practice vary between a lead and a junior? • How does ambulance transport vary between a Fire based service and an ambulance company? • Describe the training to become a paramedic. Contrast that with training for an EMT. Demonstrate that these are different levels of certification. • What is the role of an ambulance at a large HAZMAT or fire incident response? • What is the Glascow Coma Scale? What is a normal GCS? What is the GCS of a patient who has dementia? What is the GCS of a dead person? • What is the Oregon Trauma System? Describe how a trauma entry is made and what the criteria is for a trauma entry. Describe what resources are made available to the patient after an entry. • What are the most commonly used skills used by a paramedic? • Describe how flow rate is different for a 22 G IV and a 16 G IV. What type of patient is an interosseous drill used on? How are these applications different? • What do the following land marks mean and what are their applications in a pre–hospital response: midclavicular intercostals space between the 2nd and 3rd rib, cricoid membrane, and tibial plateau. • Learn what hospitals in Multnomah County have cath labs and describe what a cath lab is. What hospitals are the two trauma centers in Oregon? Where is the Oregon Burn Center? Why does this information matter for transport destination? • List other agencies that respond to large incidents with the fire service. What are their roles? Example – Specifically ask about TIPS and CHEIRS • What are skills that paramedics can’t do in the field? • What protocols, assessments, and skills were used during your ride along at AMR? Clackamas County Fire • What is the response area for the fire station that you rode along at? • What is the training for a firefighter/paramedic? • What is the breakdown of responses to 911 calls? (Medical/fire/motor vehicle collisions/ other) • What happens when someone calls 911? Who answers? Who decides what resources are sent? How is a unit dispatched? • What is the role for fire response at a large HAZMAT or fire incident response? • What are the most commonly used skills for a firefighter? • Describe the Incident Command System and the role of the fire department. Who would be in charge of a medical branch during a large response? • Describe what extrication is and how the fire department takes measures to ensure patient safety when this is performed. • Are there any protocol differences between the American Medical Response paramedics and the Clackamas County Fire paramedics? • Learn which hospitals in Clackamas County have Cath labs. • List other agencies that respond to large incidents with the fire service and their roles. Example – police, gas company • Describe what a frequeny flier is in EMS and how these patients are stuck using 911 as a medical service. • Who writes the protocols for the Clackamas County Fire Department? COURSE ORGANIZATION Curriculum will include: • One 12 hour ride along shift with Multnomah County American Medical Response • One 12 hour ride along shift with Clackamas County Fire Department • The student will complete an additional 12 hour ride along shift with Clackamas County Fire or American Medical Response at their discretion • Four hours of classroom instruction from the topics below: o Lecture prepared by the course advisor Dr. Craig Warden o Lecture prepared by Laurel Conley of REACH Air Medical Services o REACH Air Medical Services helicopter tour (operational dependent) o Lecture prepared Gary Olds on the history, structure, and purpose of emergency response This elective will take place in a busy urban 911 system (ambulance response) and in a moderately busy suburban system (fire response). COURSE CALENDAR AND SCHEDULE Four hour lecture on the 17th of June, 2014 scheduled to start at 1300 Students will schedule three ride along periods during the summer term using Gary Olds and the Clackamas Country Fire Training Officer as contacts. FORMAT The elective will provide 40 hours material divided between 4 hours of classroom lecture and 36 hours of ride along time with emergency response operations in the local area. EVALUATATION The elective will be graded on a pass/no pass basis. Students will be expected to demonstrate competency in the core aspects of assessment and treatment in emergent pre-hospital medicine. Students will be expected to complete a post-assessment quiz and will also be expected to answer the objectives listed under the Learning Goals section and write a narrative of their experience. Within the narrative students should write about a case that they did follow up if possible. Students are expected to complete their ride alongs during the summer school secession. RESOURCES Students will be expected to familiarize themselves with local paramedic protocols, American Medical Response ride along instruction packet, and pharmacologic agents used in the field prior to their first ride along (material will be provided on registration). Selected required reading will be assigned before the lecture portion of the class. Students will be expected to complete a pre-assessment quiz. COURSE POLICIES Attendance during the four hour lecture period is required and no makeup period will be available. Late work or ride alongs after the end of the summer session will not be accepted.  

Essentials of Musculoskeletal Medicine 1

OHSU Portland 

ORTH 705A  | MS1-MS2 Electives  | 1 credit(s) | 8 Weeks  | Fall term
Preqs: None 

Curriculum: Course 1(weekly): (90 minutes per session – 60 minute didactic, 30 minute practical/question and answer, will occur approximately every other week) Week 1 – Neuromuscular exam basics: myotomes, dermatomes, reflexes, etc. Week 2 - Neuromuscular disorders: pattern recognition (polyneuropathy, myopathy, etc.) Week 3 – Musculoskeletal basics: manual muscle testing, ROM, palpation skills. Week 4 – musculoskeletal disorders: pattern recognition (location, alleviating and aggravating factors, etc.) Week 5 – Basics of diagnostics: imaging, electrodiagnostics, etc. Week 6 – Non-operative management options, minimally invasive management options Week 7 – Surgical referral/management options Week 8 – Overview, epidemiology of musculoskeletal conditions, state of the literature and evidence-based support for treatment options 

Essentials of Musculoskeletal Medicine 2

OHSU Portland 

ORTH 705B  | MS1-MS2 Electives  | 1 credit(s) | 12 Weeks  | Winter term
Preqs: ORTH 705A 

Course 2 (lecture first week, practical exam experience second week): (60 minutes per session, will occur weekly, starting January 14th and ending April 8th (with one week off for Spring break)) Week 1– Cervical and thoracolumbar spine Week 2- Practical exam skills Week 3 – Shoulder Week 4 - Practical exam skills Week 5 – Elbow/wrist/hand Week 6 - Practical exam skills Week 7 – Hip Week 8 - Practical exam skills Week 9 – Knee Week 10 - Practical exam skills Week 11- Foot/ankle Week 12 - Practical exam skills Each lecture will review a specific musculoskeletal topic Lecture format will be standardized: 5 minutes to review prior topic’s quiz (first week will be introduction and housekeeping) History Physical exam tests and findings Clinical/anatomical correlations Diagnostic studies Students will have a handout that summarizes the above The “off” week will be a voluntary, mentored practical session Review and practice physical exam skills Students will have a take-home test to review that week’s topic 

Healing Power of the Written Word: Exploring Medical Literature & Creative Writing

OHSU Portland 

EMED 705A  | MS1-MS2 Electives  | 1 credit(s) | 8 weeks  | Not offered 2013-2014 Academic Year term
Preqs: MS1 or MS2 

In this course, students will examine selections written by physicians as they encountered challenging situations in their own lives and the lives of their patients. Through this exploration, the student will gain insight into struggles others have encountered and overcome. In doing so, they will build a foundation for coping with what undoubtedly lies ahead - the best and worst of times. Students will have brief weekly pre-assigned readings which will take no longer than one hour to complete. The material will cover diverse topics including: death and dying; racial and ethnic differences; personal stress and coping mechanisms; and, medical errors. Assigned material will be comprised of essays, book excerpts, journal articles and poetry. Course faculty members will act as facilitators for small group discussions which will be led by the students. The students will also create their own works in individual and group exercised to be shared with the group. Grading is pass/fail based on participation in sessions. Attendance is required at each session. 

Human Nutrition - OHSU

OHSU Portland 

GMED 705E  | MS1-MS2 Electives  | 1-2 credit(s) | 10 weeks  | Winter term
Preqs: MSCI 612 

Nutrition information and experiences that have not yet been incorporated into the curriculum will be provided. Students will become acquainted with OHSU faculty members and outside professionals who are involved in nutrition research and/or nutrition counseling in their practices. Nutrition topics of interest will change from year to year. Students may write a paper for second credit. 

Intercultural Longitudinal Health

OHSU Portland 

FAMP 705L  | MS1-MS2 Electives  | 1 credit(s) | full year  | all year term
Preqs: Fluency in a language other than English 

The Intercultural Longitudinal Health Elective (ILHE) is a 1-2 year medical student elective that aims to provide longitudinal support and advocacy for limited-English proficiency patients at the Southwest Community Health Center (SWCHC) while giving students an opportunity to enhance their ability to serve as bilingual providers in underserved community settings. Bilingual students will be matched with a patient with a chronic disease and attend his/her appointments at SWCHC throughout the year. The student will take a history and perform a clinical exam in the patient’s native language and serve as his/her advocate during interactions with the attending physician. Throughout the year, students will complete a bilingual provider training program, attend debriefing meetings with other participating students, and complete related student projects. 

Interprofessional Community Health & Education Exchange (iCHEE)

Various 

GLBH 713  | MS1-MS2 Electives  | 1 credit(s) | 6 days  | Spring term
Preqs: None 

Interdisciplinary Community Health and Education Exchange (iCHEE) for the Global Health Center is looking for 5 medical students to join interdisciplinary teams for a Saturday community health and education exchange. iCHEE is an innovative elective in student education engaging and supporting the community. The program interfaces Portland-resident refugees and other communities with students and faculty mentors from all four OHSU schools. Dental, medicine, nursing and pharmacy students develop multicultural knowledge and cross-professional skills while providing refugees health information, physical check-ups, and referrals to low-cost clinics. Dental and medical students receive 1 credit; nursing students receive credit on other courses, and pharmacy students gain "community credit". During the Spring quarter we will be working in collaboration with the Lutheran Community Services NW meeting mainly but not exclusively with Russian and Bhutanese refugees. 

Intro to Human Patient Simulation

OHSU Portland 

EMED 705C  | MS1-MS2 Electives  | 1 credit(s) | 8 weeks  | Winter, Spring term
Preqs:  

Using realistic cases on the human-patient simulator, students will practice and refine focused interviewing skills. Students will learn to interpret and apply elicited history and physical exam findings to develop differential diagnoses for each patient scenario. Students will refine effective communication skills with the patient simulator, with other members of their team, and with other health care professionals. Students will have an introduction to case-specific procedural skills, such as IV placement, intubation, and defibrillation. 

Introduction to Community Health

CLSB 2S025 

GSTR 705Q  | MS1-MS2 Electives  | 1 credit(s) | 10 weeks  | Fall term
Preqs: None 

Course Directors:Atif Zaman, MD, MPH zamana@ohsu.edu & John Stull, MD, MPH stullj@ohsu.edu This course will introduce students to the importance of community perspectives and systems in clinical practice and will help students explore the nature and meaning of those perspectives and systems through guest presentations and discussions. Using a presentation-discussion format, a variety of community-based health workers will introduce: (1) a variety of community resources & services for addressing a range of health problems encountered in both clinical and public health practice, and (2) various ways by which clinicians can identify and access those services for their patients. Topics and resources covered may include: the Oregon Health Plan & Health Reform, Health Kids Oregon, the role of Community Health Centers, the roles of Social Workers in Medicine, Hunger & Food Insecurity, Services for Patients with Special Health Care Needs, Making Effective Referrals for Dental, Mental Health, and Specialty Services, Teen Homelessness (Outside-In), Drug Rehabilitation Services, and Medical Services for Immigrant and other Underserved Communities. 1. Describe the importance of knowing about and accessing community-based services for clinical practices and their patients. 2. Describe the various specific kinds of community resources that are important for practicing clinicians and their patients. 3. Describe the challenges in accessing community resources for practices and patients, along with some of the solutions for resolving these difficulties. 4. Develop a project/program proposal designed to address the identification of, and access to, one or more community services. Time: 5:30-7:00pm Dates: Mondays (9/29, 10/6, 10/13, 10/27, 11/3, 11/10, 11/17, 11/24, 12/1, 12/8, 12/15) No session on October 20. Evaluation:Participation and Presentation & Final Paper Report Grade: Pass/Non-Pass  

Introduction to Integrative Medicine

OHSU Portland 

FAMP 705F  | MS1-MS2 Electives  | 1 credit(s) | 7 weeks  | Fall term
Preqs: none 

The Integrative Medicine Interest Group is very pleased to be offering the "Introduction to Integrative Medicine" this fall. This elective will provide an overview of integrative medicine and various healing modalities, with an emphasis on how we MD's may incorporate them into our future practices. The details of the elective are as follows: Introduction to Integrative Medicine & course overview Mind-Body Medicine (ex: meditation, biofeedback, imagery) Manual Therapies (ex: osteopathic manipulation, massage, chiropractics) Alternative Health Systems with an emphasis on Traditional Chinese Medicine (Ayurveda, homeopathy, naturopathy will be briefly described) Nutrition and Botanicals Energy Medicine; Leadership & Training Opportunities in Integrative Medicine We will provide a course packet of reading materials to supplement the sessions. Each two-hour session will include lecture, demo and hands-on portions. We believe in experiential learning. :) The sessions will be taught by local integrative medicine practitioners, including Meg Hayes MD, Anne Nedrow MD, Elie Cole MAcOM, and Al Turner DO, to name a few. As part of this course, you will be asked to write a short reflection piece. 

Introduction to Surgery

OHSU Portland 

SURG 705B  | MS1-MS2 Electives  | 1 credit(s) | Full Year  | All term
Preqs: MS1 or MS2 

This class introduces students to a surgical career and allows them to explore the range of surgical career options and lifestyles. It enables them to gain an understanding of suturing, knot tying, and other basic surgical skills as well as becoming familiar with essential surgical instruments. It helps the student to become comfortable in the operating room setting through hands-on experience while utilizing proper etiquette. It also offers the student an opportunity to acquire mentors within the OHSU Department of Surgery. Students will attend two Surgical Skills Lab sessions, attend at least one SIG Student/Faculty Interactive session, give them a minimum of four hours in the operating room, and mentor high school students who are interested in a surgery career. This course also requires two hours of volunteer work, which include mentoring high school students who are interested in a surgery, during our OHSU skills lab or helping to teach suturing to premedical or other medical students. Once started, students must complete the elective. 

Introduction to Surgery II

OHSU Portland 

SURG 705D  | MS1-MS2 Electives  | 1 credit credit(s) | full year  | All term
Preqs: MS2 

This class expands upon Introduction to Surgery. A basic proficiency of the technical skills taught in Introduction to Surgery I is required. This course requires further attendance of surgical conferences and specialty talks. Students enrolled will take on the responsibility of teaching 705B students in lab workshops. They will thereby develop their own skills further. Students will also gain further experience by participating in operations during this period. This course also requires two hours of volunteer work, which include mentoring high school students who are interested in a surgery, during our OHSU skills lab or helping to teach suturing to premedical or other medical students. Participation in the skills lab beyond the initial two hour requirement can fulfill the volunteer requirement. 

Labor & Delivery Skills

OHSU Portland 

FAMP 705H  | MS1-MS2 Electives  | 1 credit(s) | 6 weeks  | fall term
Preqs: MS1 or above 

This elective provides a special opportunity for interested medical students to gain a comprehensive introduction to prenatal care and labor and delivery support. Participants are encouraged to be co-participants in the FMIG Baby Beeper program, in which they will have the opportunity to follow a patient's care with a family medicine resident from prenatal visits through labor and delivery and postnatal care of mother and infant. Topics covered will include various aspects of prenatal care, the normal birth process, labor support techniques, dealing with stalled labor, positions, dealing effectively with shoulder dystocia, operative vaginal delivery with vacuum extractions and forceps, and neonatal transition to life. 

Living With Life-Threatening Illness

OHSU Portland 

JCON 705S  | MS1-MS2 Electives  | 2 credit(s) | Monday 5-7pm, CLSB 2S036 & CLSB 2S040  | Fall and Winter term
Preqs: None 

Course Director: David Barnard, PhD & Course Coordinator: Margaret Jeppesen (jeppesem@ohsu.edu or 494-4436) Schedule: 10 in-class sessions from 5-7pm on Monday (Dates for AY1415: 10/6. 10/20. 10/27, 11/3, 11/17, 11/24, 12/1, 12/15, 1/5, 1/26). 5-6 Individual meetings with patients/families. Location: Face-to-face sessions (CLSB2S036&2S040). Individual meetings with patients/families (travel to patient’s home or appointments may be necessary) Course Description: This interdisciplinary course introduces fundamental knowledge, attitudes, and skills for working with patients with life threatening illnesses and their families. Each student will be assigned to a patient with a life-threatening illness who they will visit 5-6 times in their homes. The focus of learning for the course will be the students’ ongoing relationship with this patient and his or her family. Weekly large group discussions will address topics such as responses to suffering, symptom control, grief and loss, spiritual concerns, and ethical dilemmas. Weekly small-group discussions will allow students to receive supervision from experienced clinicians and to reflect on personal reactions to the patient, and will help them integrate didactic material with their clinical experience. Course evaluation will be based on participation and completing a short reflection paper or letter to your patient-teacher. Learning Objectives: 1. Students will gain an understanding of the experience, for patients and families, of a life-threatening illness. 2. Students will enhance skills in creating a relationship which fosters the disclosure of intimate and sensitive material about responses to illness. 3. Students will acquire skills in communicating with patients and their families about desires for care at the end of life. 4. Students will enhance their appreciation of how their own feelings about death affect their interactions with patients. 5. Students will learn the basic elements of the hospice philosophy of care. 6. Students will understand the impact of inadequately-controlled physical and psychological symptoms on quality of life in patients with life-threatening illness. 7. Students will learn the most common physical and psychological symptoms that accompany life-threatening illness. 8. Students will explore the roles of ethical principles (e.g. autonomy, beneficence, non-malfeasance) in making decision making near the end of life. 9. Students will learn the phenomenology and course of the grieving process and its impact on physical and psychological health. 10. Students will learn about different cultural, religious, and spiritual constructs of the meaning of death and their impact on the experience of life-threatening illness. 11. Students will enhance their understanding of the meanings of death to physicians within the culture of medicine. 12. Students will gain understanding of physicians' adaptive and maladaptive responses to dying patients. 13. Students will gain enhanced appreciation of patients as teachers about the process of illness and the experience of receiving medical care Assessment Methods: Participation (20%), Patient Visits (60%), Reading (10%), Final Reflective Paper (10%) Grade: Pass/No-Pass  

MD.iabetic

OHSU Portland 

FAMP 705K  | MS1-MS2 Electives  | 1 credit(s) | 10 weeks  | Spring term
Preqs: None 

Nearly all future physicians, regardless of specialty or location, will encounter patients with diabetes throughout the scope of their practice. This course will provide future physicians with an understanding of how diabetes – as an illness and not just as a pathological disease – can affect patients' lives on a day-to-day basis. The course will include a three-week educational period, followed by a 4-week simulated diabetes experience, 2 extended weeks of special topics, and a final week for reflection. Students will be trained to monitor glucose levels, count carbohydrates, administer insulin injections, and otherwise live as if they were diagnosed with diabetes. By the end of the course, students will understand the magnitude of lifestyle change required of these patients to maintain their health and the variety of financial and behavioral mediators that impact health decisions. This elective will allow future physicians to be more resourceful, empathetic caretakers of their chronically ill patients. 

MD/PhD Journal Club

OHSU Portland 

BCMB 705A  | MS1-MS2 Electives  | 1 credit(s) | 12 Weeks  | Full Year term
Preqs: MD/PhD 1st and 2nd year students 

MD/PhD students only. 

Motivating Healthy Eating

OHSU Portland 

GMED 705U  | MS1-MS2 Electives  | 1 credit(s) | 8 weeks  | Winter term
Preqs: 1st or 2nd Yr Student 

Motivational interviewing is an approach to behavior change based on guiding patients to outline their own reasons for change. By developing focused skills in asking, listening, and informing, health care professional students will be able to elicit the change talk that will empower patients to make lifestyle changes. This course will be an intensive training in MI by a certified trainer, with feedback that will help students feel prepared to help their future patients eat healthier. 

Otolaryngology - Soft Tissue Technique Practicum

OHSU Portland 

OTOL 709F  | MS1-MS2 Electives  | 1 credit(s) | 2 4-hour sessions  | Any term
Preqs: None 

Practical application of soft tissue surgical techniques using video tape instruction segments as well as individual instruction by Otolaryngologist/ Facial Plastic Surgeons during a two day intensive course. The course is focused on soft tissue handling and reconstructive techniques with particular emphasis for those that are applicable around the face. The basic principles of soft tissue surgery proceeding to moderately advanced techniques will be taught. Incisions, excisions, appropriate instrument usage and broad variety of wound closure techniques will be taught and practiced (subcuticular suturing, deep suturing, surface suturing and staple usage). Surface flaps of all types (advancement, rotation, interposition, Rhombic, bilobed) Z-plasty and scar camouflage surgery are covered. Priority is given to students in the first year of medical school as they have had the least exposure to soft tissue reconstruction. Maximum number of students 8 - Minimum number of students 4. 

Physiology & Pharmacology of Pain

OHSU Portland 

NSUR 705A  | MS1-MS2 Electives  | 1 credit(s) | 6 weeks  | Not offered 2013-2014 Academic Year term
Preqs: Neuroscience & Behavior (concurrent) 

This six-week course will allow students to explore pain in terms if both mechanism and treatment. Following an introductory review of the neural basis of pain transmission and modulation, the course will consider common, clinically significant pain syndromes (e.g., headache) and factors that have a significant impact on pain (e.g., pain in children). Each of these sessions will consist of a brief didactic presentation by the faculty followed by a student-led presentation on a relevant article or case report. At the end of the course, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge related to pain pathways, and to mechanisms and treatment of acute and chronic pain. 

Practce Management and Innovation

OHSU Portland 

FAMP 705G  | MS1-MS2 Electives  | 1 credit(s) | full term  | varies term
Preqs: 1st or 2nd year student 

The structure of the American health care delivery system will undergo profound changes during the course of the 21st century as Medicare enrollment soars and rising healthcare costs meet a threashold beyond which the American public cannot sustain. Current health professions students will benefit from gaining a practical understanding of how medical clinics currently operate within the healthcare system and what new approaches are being developed to meet the needs of patients and providers both now and in the future. 

Preceptorship Experience

OHSU Portland 

JCON 709P  | MS1-MS2 Electives  | 1 credit(s) | 12 weeks  | Fall, Winter or Spring term
Preqs: PCM1 

PCMstyle preceptorship only. Must have satisfactorily completed PCM 1 including preceptorship portion of the course. This is designed primarily for students who are enrolled in either a combined degree program, pathology fellowship or a research year and wish to continue with a preceptorship experience during that time away from their medical school curriculum. 

Reproductive Health Choices

OHSU Portland 

OBGY 705D  | MS1-MS2 Electives  | 1 or 2 credit(s) |   | Every other year in Winter term, Will not be offered in 2011-2012 term
Preqs: none 

Topics covered include contraception, infertility, sterilization, medical and issues and religious perspectives on abortion and contraception. Lecture and panel discussion format. 

Simulation-Based Clinical Medicine

OHSU Portland 

EMED 705D  | MS1-MS2 Electives  | 1 credit(s) | 4 weeks  | spring  term
Preqs: Completion of MS1 Curriculum 

The main purpose of this course is to facilitate the formation of illness scripts. An illness script represents a provider's stored knowledge of disease states, conditions and processes acquired through experience. With the use of patient-simulators, cases will be presented for the students to integrate their basic science knowledge through its application to clinical scenarios, compare and contrast features of each case, and begin the formation of illness scripts. 

Specialty Talks

CLSB3A001 

JCON 705P  | MS1-MS2 Electives  | 1 credit(s) | Wednesdays 3-4pm  | All year term
Preqs: Completion of MS1 Curriculum 

Schedule: 10 in-class sessions from 3:00-4:00pm on Wednesdays (8/27, 9/17, 10/8, 11/12, 12/3, 1/14, 2/25, 3/11. 4/8, 4/22) & A Special Speed-Dating Session during the Winter Term (date to be determined). Course Description: This course will assist medical students with two challenges they face early in their careers. The first is the understanding and identification of specialties of interest to allow them to begin defining and achieving personal success in the National Residency Match Program. As growth in American medical schools outpaces growth in residency programs the match has become more competitive. This means it is more important than ever to identify and explore specialties of interest as early as possible as well as identify mentors and enrichment opportunities in their fields of interest. The second challenge is that in an era of sub-specialization it is difficult, even for practicing clinicians, to fully understand what our colleagues do in medicine. The practice of medicine requires interdisciplinary collaboration in order to provide the highest quality of care for our patients. This course will explore a breadth and depth of medical specialties and sub-specialties so that even students who enter medical school knowing what specialty they wish to practice will gain exposure to what providers in other fields do. Learning Objectives: 1. Upon completion of this course, students will have improved insight about their own values, interests and skills and use this information to appraise how those fit with different medical specialties. 2. Conduct an informational interview with one representative physician in a field of possible interest and write a brief report on what they learned and gained from the experience. 3. Gain exposure through the panels, interview and speed dating to a number of possible career mentors. 4. Report in writing what excited, surprised and reassured them about the information they gained in both specialty and personal exploration. Assessment Methods: Participation (at least 8 out of 10 sessions required), Submission of session questionnaires for all attended sessions, Submission of summary of an informational faculty interview in a specialty of your choice, Completion of Careers in Medicine website self-assessment profiles, submit printed screens (Medical Specialty Preference Inventory, Physician Values in Practice Scale, Specialty Indecision Scale) Final Grade: Pass/No Pass  

Student-Senior Connection

OHSU Portland 

FAMP 705J  | MS1-MS2 Electives  | 1 credit credit(s) | full year  | All term
Preqs: None 

A yearlong longitudinal partnership between medial students (Yrs 1-4) and an older member residing in Willamette View Retirement Community. This opportunity provides a means of knowing the lives of healthy older adults and for the adults to serve as mentors to medical students. There will be a series of 6-8 meetings in the academic year. 

Summer Preceptorship

OHSU Portland 

JCON 709S  | MS1-MS2 Electives  | 1 credit(s) | 3 weeks  | Summer term
Preqs: MS1 

Students are responsible for selecting a site and obtaining a preceptor. 

Summer Research

OHSU Portland 

JCON 701S  | MS1-MS2 Electives  | 4 credit(s) | 4 weeks  | Summer (between 1st & 2nd year only) term
Preqs: MS1 

Students may conduct research under the direction of a faculty mentor in selected areas of ongoing research or carry out pilot studies to initiate new research projects. The Research Elective Request form must be signed off by the faculty member, department clerkship coordinator and the ESDA office prior to starting. 

Surgery Research - 1st & 2nd Yr

OHSU Portland 

SURG 701  | MS1-MS2 Electives  | 1-4 credit(s) | Varies  | any term
Preqs:  

The Surgery Research elective is an opportunity for you to participate in a research project that you may have interest in. In order to receive credit, there are some things we will need from you to process your paperwork. I. Approval of Rotation: a. You will need to fill obtain a request form from the Dean’s office and get the appropriate signatures. b. Once you have signed and your preceptor has signed, you will need to turn it on to the surgery Medical Student Coordinator along with a brief summary and your preceptor’s name, phone number, and email address. Your summary should include what the expected outcome you are looking for and what the project will include. c. The Medical Student Coordinator will submit it to the Clerkship Director for approval. d. The Medical Student Coordinator will send it to the Dean’s office for approval. e. The Medical Student Coordinator will contact you to let you know your request has been accepted, needs more information, or not approved. f. Once approved and signed by all parties, the Medical Student Coordinator will send you a copy of your completed signed form. II. Completion of Rotation: a. You will need to submit a 2-4 page report to include the following topics and information: i. Attendings name and contact information. ii. Hours worked. iii. Background of the process you are studying and the question you are trying to answer. iv. Description of your actual research experience. 1. Were charts reviewed? 2. Were patients enrolled? 3. What information did you examine? 4. Did you undertake a statistical analysis? 5. Which methods were utilized? b. If you have preliminary data, you should try to write an abstract. c. Submit a plan for eventual submission and presentation of your work. 

SW Volunteer Clinic

Portland 

FAMP 709K  | MS1-MS2 Electives  | 1 credit(s) | Full Year  | All term
Preqs:  

Must do at least 4 shifts to receive credit. Southwest Community Health Center is a local 501c3 nonprofit safety net clinic providing medical care for uninsured residents of Multnomah and Washington counties. -OHSU SOM students participate in the organization and clinical care provided at this clinic, on Tuesday and Thursday afternoons from 4-8pm. -Students room patients, obtain vital signs, conduct basic history of present illness, review of systems, medication reconciliation, and perform basic physical exam skills. -students present the patients to the attending or resident physicians and help develop the assessment and plan for the patients. - Students assist patients in navigating the complexities of specialized care for uninsured patients, and discover resources for assisting patients in accessing care. Contact the SWCHC Student Coordinators if you are interested or have questions: swccoordinators@ohsu.edu  

The Resiliency Elective

OHSU Portland 

OBGY 705C  | MS1-MS2 Electives  | 1 credit(s) | 8-10 weeks  | Winter term
Preqs: None 

The Resiliency Elective: An Experiential Introduction to Resiliency Training Introduction: As part of the Educational Initiative in Student Integrative Self-Care, an elective course in resiliency training will be offered to first and second year medical student during Winter term Purpose: Mind-body approaches – including self-awareness, relaxation, meditation, guided imagery, biofeedback, nutrition, physical exercise, art, music and movement are among the best known and most widely used of the integrative approaches to enhance resiliency and manage stress. By their very nature they put high value on and teach the power of self-awareness and self-care. In so doing, they help shape a new integrative model of healthcare – one in which treatment is balanced with teaching; in which lifestyle, prevention and self-care are given as much respect as procedures and pharmacological interventions. In order for students to understand the potential of mind-body approaches, as well as apply them in clinical practice, we believe that they should experience these approaches themselves. It is not enough to hear about mind-body medicine and to read and comprehend the scientific basis for its efficacy. For students to appreciate their patients’ capacities for self-awareness and self-care, students should experience and realize their own abilities. Description: The integrative self-care initiative pilot elective will be offered to a maximum of 30 first and second year medical students (3 groups of 10 students). Each group will meet for 2 hours once/week for either eight, nine or ten weeks (depending on day selected) with two faculty members who will co-facilitate the sessions. This is a different style of learning with minimal ‘didactic’. The students will learn the techniques, practice them and discuss their experiences with members of the small group. Students will have an opportunity not only for individual attention and instruction, but for sharing what they are learning about stress, resiliency and themselves. 

Topics in International Health

OHSU Portland 

JCON 705A  | MS1-MS2 Electives  | 2 credit(s) | 9 weeks  | Spring term
Preqs: None 

This course explores clinical, population-based, and public health theory and issues from an international perspective. The goal of the course is to prepare medical and nursing students interested in health problems and diseases in developing countries to consider the challenge of clinical and/or public health electives or vocational opportunities in international settings. The student will appreciate the interrelationships of disease, overpopulation, society, politics, economics, and the environment and how the lives and health of people living in the developing world are impacted. Two hours per week for 9 weeks.