OHSU

Dr. Schreiber explores method to reduce blood-clot risk in trauma patients Share This OHSU Content

03/10/11  Portland, Ore.

Dr. SchreiberMartin Schreiber, MD, Professor, Department of Surgery, received a research grant worth nearly $700,000 from the National Trauma Institute (NTI) to study a method that could more accurately determine how much blood-clot prevention medication to give critically ill or obese trauma patients.  Schreiber’s study is one of nine that received grants this year from NTI, a nonprofit organization dedicated to funding trauma research in the United States in an effort to reduce death and disability, and the associated costs, related to trauma injury.

Dr. Schreiber, OHSU’s chief of trauma, critical care and acute care surgery, will explore whether Thrombelastography (TEG) can guide physicians to a better dosing formula for Lovenox. TEG is a method for testing the efficiency of coagulation in the blood. The standard dose for this drug may not fully prevent the development of clots, especially in critically ill or obese patients. The risk of developing a blood clot occurs in up to 60 percent of all critical care patients. Schreiber and his team will compare the development of blood clots in patients receiving a standard dose of the medicine to patients receiving a dose guided by TEG.

The complete OHSU media release is available online.