Marquam Hill Lectures Archive

Video archives

In the interest of serving all Oregonians, each Marquam Hill Lecture is recorded. You can watch/listen to previous lectures in the archives below.

2015-16 lecture series

Beyond Genetics: The Role of Nutrition in Health and Disease | Presented by Susan Bagby, M.D.

Watch video (November 19, 2015)

Chances are, you know someone with high blood pressure. Also known as hypertension, high blood pressure was associated with 38.9 million doctor visits in 2010, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. What if we could prevent this, and other chronic diseases, by changing how we eat? It turns out your DNA is not a rigid blueprint for future health. 

Susan Bagby, M.D., professor of medicine in the OHSU School of Medicine, has devoted her research career to finding out what triggers high blood pressure. Now, Dr. Bagby is among a group of internationally-recognized scientists at the OHSU Moore Institute for Nutrition & Wellness who study the role of nutrition in the womb and factors that predict future disease. Their work is the foundation of a movement to better the future.

Lessons from the Battlefield: How Military Trauma Care Transforms Civilian Care in the United States | Presented by Martin Schreiber, M.D.

Watch video (February 18, 2016)

Head and brain trauma are two of the most common mechanisms of injury on the battlefield. Medical professionals must act quickly with the best available guidelines to treat injured war fighters. How do advances in military trauma care influence the way civilian trauma care is delivered? Martin Schreiber, M.D., professor of surgery in the OHSU School of Medicine, has served in Iraq and Afghanistan and is a leader in the trauma community. His research and experience in military theater has saved lives and is being incorporated into trauma care at OHSU and around the country. Results of his studies have wide-reaching implications for situations we all hope to avoid, but are critical when patients are the most vulnerable. 

Attendees got a behind-the-scenes perspective from a military physician and learned how Dr. Schreiber's work is improving treatments at home for patients with serious trauma.

The 24-Hour Clock and Human Health | Presented by Steven Shea, Ph.D.

Watch video (March 17, 2016)

Did you know heart attacks occur most frequently in the morning? And asthma is generally worst at night? What's behind this connection between the 24-hour clock and the body clock? Steven Shea, Ph.D., director and senior scientist at the Oregon Institute of Occupational Health Sciences, seeks to uncover why the severity of many diseases varies across the 24-hour period. If scientists can understand the biological basis behind these changes, it may provide insight into the underlying cause of the disease and could lead to better therapy. Dr. Shea's research also includes studies of sleep and circadian rhythms as they relate to accidents and the overall health of shift workers and people suffering from sleep disorders. 

Attendees of this lecture learned more about the fascinating interplay between being asleep, being awake and being healthy.

The Promise of Gene Therapy for Metabolic Rare Diseases | Presented by Cary Harding, M.D.

Watch video (April 21, 2016)

What is a rare disease? The National Institutes of Health define it as a disease that generally affects fewer than 200,000 people in the United States. However, about 7,000 such disorders have been identified, affecting an estimated 25-30 million Americans! Cary Harding, M.D., professor of molecular and medical genetics in the OHSU School of Medicine, studies inborn errors of metabolism (IEM), which are rare genetic disorders in which the body cannot properly turn food into energy. Sometimes people are born with the disorders and sometimes they develop them as adults. Existing medical options, such as a restricted diet, are less than ideal. Gene therapy is a promising new approach for people with IEM. Dr. Harding and his colleagues are on the cutting-edge of developing gene transfer therapies for the treatment of IEM.

Attendees learned about the promising research that could affect the lives of millions of people in this country with a rare disease.

Transforming Cancer Care with Next Generation Sequencing | Presented by Christopher Corless, M.D., Ph.D.

Watch video (May 19, 2016)

Cancers are caused by mutations in a person's DNA. These mutations cause tumors to grow. New technology gives researchers mountains of data about cancer, but how can this information be turned into the right therapy for the right tumor? The OHSU Knight Cancer Institute is using big data analysis to advance precision cancer care. Christopher Corless, M.D., Ph.D., professor of pathology in the OHSU School of Medicine and chief medical officer of OHSU's Knight Diagnostic Laboratories, is an expert in personalized diagnostics. Dr. Corless and colleagues take millions of fragments of DNA from a single sample and use high-end computing tools to sequence them at the same time. This next generation sequencing helps scientists identify the weak points in many types of cancer, and helps health care providers create personalized treatment plans for patients. 

Attendees learned how OHSU researchers are turning data into knowledge that will transform the way all cancers are treated – one patient at a time. 

2014-15 lecture series

Secrets of the Developing Brain | Presented by Bonnie Nagel, Ph.D.

Watch video (October 16, 2014)

Bonnie Nagel, Ph.D., associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral neuroscience in the OHSU School of Medicine, is an expert on adolescent neurodevelopment. Dr. Nagel and colleagues have been studying brain development in healthy and at-risk youth for years. Their work reveals secrets of the developing brain, including developmental differences between the sexes, and how experiences (both positive and negative) impact the brain. 

This lecture helped parents, friends and teenagers themselves get a better understanding of what makes adolescence such a unique and vulnerable time. 

Beating Cancer with Exercise | Presented by Kerri Winters-Stone, Ph.D., FACSM

Watch video (November 20, 2014)

Exercise is known to prevent and help manage chronic diseases like diabetes or heart disease. Can exercise also help cancer survivors live longer and better? This question is at the heart of a compelling body of research led by Kerri Winters-Stone, Ph.D., research professor in the OHSU School of Nursing. 

Dr. Winters-Stone and colleagues want to know more about the healing power of exercise. Can it slow cancer progression? Can exercise help both patients and family members affected by cancer? Early results have revealed unexpected benefits for patients who exercise with their spouse. 

Ending an Epidemic: OHSU's Hunt for an HIV Vaccine | Presented by Louis Picker, M.D.

Watch video (February 19, 2015)

When Louis Picker, M.D., and his colleagues described in 2013 how their HIV vaccine candidate worked, the world took notice. Dr. Picker, associate director of the OHSU Vaccine and Gene Therapy Institute, developed a vaccine that prevents a virus similar to HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. 

For the more than 35 million people around the globe living with HIV, this research may signal the end to a decades-long battle to end the disease. With new support, including a $25 million grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Dr. Picker is moving forward to test the safety of a human version of the vaccine that may someday prevent or cure HIV infection. Attendees learned first-hand how OHSU research could transform the way physicians, researchers and public health advocates fight against HIV.

The Magic of Microbubbles | Presented by Sanjiv Kaul, M.D.

Watch video (April 16, 2015)

One in every four deaths in the United States is caused by heart disease. Coronary heart disease – the most common type – accounts for 380,000 deaths annually, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 

Sanjiv Kaul, M.D., Ernest C. Swigert chair of cardiology and professor of medicine in the OHSU School of Medicine, pioneered a powerfully effective screening test for the early detection of coronary heart disease. Used more than five million times in patients around the world, myocardial contrast echocardiography combines microbubbles and ultrasound technology to create images of the heart. Dr. Kaul, who is also co-director of the OHSU Knight Cardiovascular Institute, talked about how these tiny bubbles will someday help detect and treat other ailments, including cancer. 

Declaring War on Melanoma | Presented by Sancy Leachman, M.D., Ph.D.

Watch video (May 21, 2015)

Watch out, melanoma. We're teaming up to get you. Those words capture the sentiment of OHSU's aggressive campaign to prevent, detect and treat melanoma. Sancy Leachman, M.D., Ph.D., professor and chair of dermatology in the OHSU School of Medicine, is a world-renowned melanoma researcher who is determined to find answers and reduce deaths caused by melanoma. 

Oregon consistently has one of the highest rates of melanoma incidence and death in the nation, particularly for women, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Why is melanoma so common in a state that is known more for rain than sunshine? A team of researchers at OHSU, in collaboration with patients, their family and friends, have created the Melanoma Community Registry – a first step in the "war" to make melanoma the victim. Attendees gained practical information about melanoma and to learn what's on the horizon for this type of cancer.

2013-14 lecture series

Fixing What's Broken: OHSU's Role in Health Reform and Evidence-based Medicine | Presented by: Roger Chou, M.D., and John McConnell, Ph.D.

Watch video (May 29, 2014)

All eyes are on Oregon for the state's trailblazing approach to health care reform, including the coordinated care organizations focused on Medicaid transformation. At the same time, clinicians, employers and health care associations look to federal and state agencies when making decisions about health services. OHSU researchers and physicians are working behind the scenes on both fronts. John McConnell, Ph.D., director of the Center for Health Systems Effectiveness at OHSU, is leading a study which will inform the nation on what works – and what doesn't work – in health reform. Roger Chou, M.D., director of the Pacific Northwest Evidence-based Practice Center, heads up systematic reviews of health care topics which inform groups like the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force.

Healthy Mouth, Healthy Body: The Link Between Gum Disease and Diabetes | Presented by: James Katancik, D.D.S., Ph.D.

Watch video (April 17, 2014)

Diabetes rates are soaring. A closer look shows a surprising fact: Gum disease is commonly associated with diabetes. Does this mean gum disease is a cause, a symptom or an early indicator of diabetes – or something else entirely? So far, research shows that periodontitis – another name for gum disease – affects more than just the mouth. It's a whole body infection that also impacts our ability to normally process glucose. James Katancik, D.D.S., Ph.D., associate professor and chair of the Department of Periodontology in the OHSU School of Dentistry, was involved in a national study which sought definitive scientific evidence for the relationship between gum disease and diabetes.

Unlocking the Secrets of Cancer Growth | Presented by: Lisa Coussens, Ph.D.

Watch video (February 20, 2014)

If we can understand how and why a cancerous tumor grows, we can stop it. Scientists are learning more about tumor growth with each new clinical trial and lab study, but it will take researchers working in multiple disciplines to unlock the secrets of cancer growth. Lisa Coussens, Ph.D., chair of the OHSU Department of Cell and Developmental Biology and director of basic research for the OHSU Knight Cancer Institute, is building an interactive and innovative environment for cutting-edge biomedical research at OHSU. She is world-renowned for her work exploring how cells that surround a tumor fuel its growth and affect its response to treatment. Her research found that during the early stages of cancer, white blood cells – normally used by the body for healing – sometimes help tumors grow.

Nerve Remodeling After a Heart Attack | Presented by: Beth Habecker, Ph.D.

Watch video (November 21, 2013)

Beth Habecker, Ph.D., has been studying for more than a decade the body's physical remodeling following a heart attack. Her research aims to understand why changes in this process – which can trigger arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death – sometimes occur. Dr. Habecker is professor of physiology and pharmacology at OHSU, and her lab has uncovered surprising new evidence which may contain answers to other perplexing nerve injuries, such as those in the spinal cord. If clinicians and scientists can better understand the remodeling process, they can develop more appropriate treatments and prevention methods for the 715,000 Americans each year who have a heart attack.

Where Does Disease Come From? Revealing the Secrets of Epigenetics | Presented by: Kent Thornburg, Ph.D.

Watch video (October 17, 2013)

Kent Thornburg, Ph.D., director of the OHSU Bob and Charlee Moore Institute for Nutrition & Wellness, and professor of medicine at OHSU, is an internationally recognized leader in the research field known as the developmental origins of health and disease. He studies the vital connection between maternal diet, the quality of fetal growth and epigenetics – how adult onset diseases are "programmed" in the womb.

2012-13 lecture series

Creating a Google Map of Cancer? presented by: Joe Gray, Ph.D. (March 21, 2013)

Imagine being able to visualize every twist and turn of cancer as it progresses throughout the human body – and know just when and how to stop it in its path. Using powerful advanced imaging technologies that illustrate cells, tissues and structural details across time, OHSU scientists are assembling the "Google map" of cancer and other diseases.

Joe Gray, Ph.D., is chair of the Department of Biomedical Engineering, associate director for translational research in the OHSU Knight Cancer Institute and director of the OHSU Center for Spatial Systems Biomedicine. Dr. Gray demonstrated how he and colleagues are working to catapult us into the 21st century with four-dimensional medicine (three spatial dimensions and time).

Vaccination Nation? Separating Fact from Fiction presented by: Mark Slifka, Ph.D. (February 21, 2013)

Mark Slifka, Ph.D., professor of molecular microbiology and immunology and senior scientist at the OHSU Vaccine and Gene Therapy Institute and Oregon National Primate Research Center, has been studying vaccines for more than 15 years. Dr. Slifka's research, examining decades of data, suggests people have a physiological ceiling for vaccine immunity, which may argue for a shift in the current revaccination schedule for millions of Americans. It also indicates that the recent media hype about the danger of vaccinations, or their connection to autism and other disorders, is scientifically unfounded.

Thinking Outside the Box to Treat Late-Stage Cancer presented by: Melissa Wong, Ph.D. (November 15, 2012)

Melissa Wong, Ph.D., is an associate professor of dermatology and cell and developmental biology, a researcher in the Oregon Stem Cell Center and a member of the OHSU Knight Cancer Institute. Dr. Wong's goal is to track down and stop cancer cells before they turn deadly. Her presentation focused on the search for the elusive triggers that spark cancer cells' aggressive behavior and explain how this information may help shape new life-saving treatments for late-stage cancer.

Unraveling Addiction Using Behavioral Genetics presented by: Tamara Phillips, Ph.D. (October 18, 2012)

Tamara Phillips, Ph.D., is an award-winning researcher, a professor of behavioral neuroscience in the OHSU School of Medicine and a senior research career scientist at the Portland Veterans Affairs Medical Center. She asks: What if we could identify the genes that predispose some people to be attracted to drugs or alcohol? She and colleagues focus on the genetic dissection of behavioral traits thought to influence risk for the development of alcoholism and drug abuse.

MARK O. HATFIELD LECTURE: Dr. Chu goes to Washington
A special presentation by the Marquam Hill Lecture Series

Presented by: Steven Chu, Ph.D. (April 23, 2013)Human health and well-being depend on a healthy global environment. Steven Chu, Ph.D., discussed his vision of our energy future and how innovations in technology and public policy can help us/U.S. lead the world to a sustainable future. Dr. Chu is a distinguished scientist and co-winner of the Nobel Prize for Physics (1997). He served as the United States Secretary of Energy from January 2009 to April 2013.Prior to this appointment, Dr. Chu was director of the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab where he led the lab in pursuit of alternative and renewable energy technologies; he also taught at the University of California as a professor of physics and molecular and cell biology. He has returned to Stanford as a member of the Physics and Molecular and Cellular Physiology Departments.

OHSU concurrently welcomed Dr. Chu as a 125th anniversary lecturer.

2011-12 lecture series

Exercise and Nutrition: The Best Medicine presented by Kerry Kuehl, M.D., Dr.PH. (April 19, 2012)

Dr. Kuehl is an Associate Professor of Medicine and Co-Director of the Human Performance Laboratory in the Division of Health Promotion & Sports Medicine at OHSU. As a primary care physician with a master’s degree in exercise physiology and a doctorate in nutrition, he specializes in using exercise and nutrition in the treatment and prevention of disease.

Dr. Kuehl discussed the irrefutable body of scientific evidence that links your good health and longevity with being physically active and eating a healthy diet. Watch the video of his talk here. On April 14, Dr. Kuehl was a guest on the OHSU Effect radio show. You can listen to the show or download a podcast.

What do Women (and Men) Want? Next Generation Birth Control and Family Planning presented by Jeffrey Jensen, M.D., M.P.H. (February 16, 2012)

Why are new birth control choices needed? What is the relationship between population growth and environmental problems? In his Feb. 16, 2012 lecture, Dr. Jensen addressed these, and many more, questions. Dr. Jensen talked about next-generation birth control and the race to bring better choices to family planning. Dr. Jensen is the Leon Speroff Professor and Vice Chair for Research in the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Director of the Women's Health Research Unit in the Center for Women's Health, and a collaborating scientist at the Oregon National Primate Research Center.

Watch the video of his talk here. On Feb. 4, Dr. Jensen was a guest on the OHSU Effect radio show. You can listen to the show or download a podcast.

New Windows to Your Heart: Breakthroughs in Cardiovascular Imaging presented by Jonathan Lindner, M.D. (November 17, 2011)

Can you picture the heart at its molecular level? In this talk, Dr. Lindner explained – and showed – images of the heart that bring disease out of hiding, before it becomes deadly. Dr. Lindner is a Professor of Medicine, Cardiovascular Division, with a joint appointment in the Department of Biomedical Engineering in the OHSU School of Medicine. Dr. Lindner is an internationally known leader in cutting edge methods for imaging and treatment of heart disease, and inflammatory diseases. He is also Associate Chief for Education in OHSU’s Cardiovascular Division and directs the training program for cardiologists in training. 

Watch the video of Dr. Lindner's lecture here. On Nov. 12, 2011, Dr. Lindner was a guest on the OHSU Effect radio show. You can listen to the show or download a podcast. 

The Hunt for Biological Mechanisms in Asthma presented by Allison Fryer, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Medicine, and Associate Dean for Graduate Studies (October 20, 2011)

The number of people diagnosed with asthma grows every year. Yet the biological pathways that cause the airway narrowing and closure characteristic of asthma are poorly understood. Dr. Fryer presented research Oct. 20, 2011 about peripheral nerves – nerves that connect the brain to the lungs – and how they are changed through interactions with cells from the immune system to cause the excessive airway narrowing seen in asthma exacerbations. Dr. Fryer is a Professor of Medicine and the Associate Dean for Graduate Studies in the OHSU School of Medicine.

Watch the video of Dr. Fryer's lecture here. On Oct. 8, 2011, Dr. Fryer was a guest on the OHSU Effect radio show. You can listen to the show or download a podcast.

Mark O. Hatfield Lecture: The Value of Health—The Argument for Strong Investment in Medical and Scientific Research A special presentation by the Marquam Hill Lecture Series

Presented by: Albert Starr, M.D. (March 15, 2012) The late Senator Hatfield was a tireless advocate for scientific and medical research and for Oregon’s system of higher education. That advocacy made possible the Oregon Health & Science University we know today. To honor his legacy, OHSU hosts an annual Mark O. Hatfield Lecture, delivered this year by Dr. Albert Starr. Dr. Starr came to OHSU in 1957 and led OHSU’s heart surgery program. He is best known for co-inventing and implanting the world’s first successful artificial heart valve, the Starr-Edwards Heart Valve, in 1960. Since then, the artificial heart valve technology has saved literally hundreds of thousands of lives.In his lecture, Dr. Starr discussed the importance of public support in the advancement of his own research – as well as that of OHSU – and examined the social and economic benefits of health and longevity. Watch the video of his talk here.

2010-11 lecture series

Neuroprotection and Stroke: New Strategies to Protect Against Brain Injury presented by Mary Stenzel-Poore, Ph.D., and Helmi Lutsep, M.D. (April 21, 2011)

Current clinical treatments for stroke focus on rapidly applied, post-stroke therapies and physical rehabilitation. What if it were possible to identify those most at risk for stroke and offer "pre-treatment" to provide protection before a stroke ever occurs? Dr. Stenzel-Poore identifies stimulii that improve the brain's response through preconditioning.

Forty Years in Alcohol and Drug Abuse Research: A Personal History (audio) presented by Robert Hitzemann, Ph.D. (March 21, 2011) 

Part science, part history, Hitzemann's story of 40 years of research into substance abuse begins when researchers knew of the existence of only four neurotransmitters, and considered hallucinogens to be an appropriate model for schizophrenia research. Researchers now study many hundreds of neurotransmitters, employ sophisticated techniques to help us better understand the chemistry of substance abuse in the brain, and guide clinical and societal solutions to its impacts.

Rare Disorders - Unique Challenges for Families and Physicians presented by Susan Hayflick, M.D. (November 18, 2010)

Rare diseases are those that affect fewer than 200,000 Americans at any given time. Nearly 7,000 such diseases are known today, many of them targeting children and all impacting patients and families. Dr. Hayflick has dedicated her research to finding a cure for neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA), a group of rare, genetic neurological disorders. Dr. Hayflick will discuss the science that many of these rare diseases share and the social and economic challenges that these patients face.

The Future of Interventional Cardiology - Or Are We Already There? presented by Saurabh Gupta, M.D. (October 15, 2010)

Using research data and a series of animations, Dr. Gupta will guide attendees through the body's vascular system into the heart to demonstrate new and innovative uses for stents, balloons and umbrellas in catheter-based treatments for structural heart defects.