Two OHSU Physicians Honored

05/07/04    Portland, Ore.

 

Two physicians at Oregon Health & Science University have received one of the highest honors conferred by medical professional organizations, the designation as a master of their specialty.

Masters are a small group of distinguished physicians who have exhibited preeminence in clinical practice or medical research, having made significant contributions to medicine.

JAMES REULER, M.D., M.A.C.P.
A professor of medicine (internal medicine and geriatrics) at the OHSU School of Medicine, Reuler has been named a master in the American College of Physicians, an organization for specialists in general internal medicine and related subspecialties. Reuler was instrumental in creating The Wallace Medical Concern, which provides free health care to the homeless and other underserved populations in Portland through several community clinics.

One of 41 physicians nationwide to be named a master in the American College of Physicians this year, Reuler is also section chief for general internal medicine at the Portland VA Medical Center. He joins two other current OHSU physicians previously named masters: D. Lynn Loriaux, M.D., Ph.D., chairman of medicine at the School of Medicine, and John Benson Jr., M.D., professor of medicine and dean emeritus of the School of Medicine.

Reuler is a 1973 graduate of the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine.

DAVID SAHN, M.D., M.A.C.C.
A professor of pediatrics at the OHSU School of Medicine, Sahn has been named a master of the American College of Cardiology. He was one of just four cardiovascular specialists who the organization recently awarded its master designation, recognizing their outstanding achievements.

A pediatric cardiologist by training, Sahn is an expert in cardiac imaging and diagnosis and congenital heart disease. A graduate of Yale University School of Medicine, he heads OHSU's Clinical Care Center for Congenital Heart Disease and is widely recognized for his work spanning the gamut from prenatal diagnosis to care of adults with congenital heart disease.

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