OHSU Teams With OMSI for Brain Awareness Week, March 12 - 18

03/07/00    Portland, Ore.


Portland's Brain Awareness Week Celebration kicks off on Sunday, March 12, with a day of entertainment, activities, displays and games for the family. Other events include workshops for teachers, lectures for the public and a brain fair. Oregon Health Sciences University, the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry and the Oregon chapter of the Society for Neuroscience are the local sponsors of Brain Awareness Week.

Featured events at OMSI:

Brain Games
Sunday, March 12
Noon to 5 p.m.
The kickoff celebration features a birthday celebration for Albert Einstein. Kids and adults will have an opportunity to learn about TIME magazine's "Man of the Century." Youngsters can enter the Einstein Look-alike contest and win a T-shirt. Families will have a chance to witness interactive presentations by OHSU scientists. David Heil, former host of the children's PBS series "Newton's Apple," and Eric Chudler, Ph.D., director of the Neuroscience for Kids program at the University of Washington, will demonstrate brain phenomena to amaze and educate kids and parents.

Brain Fair
Sunday, March 12
Noon to 5 p.m.
(and March 13, 14 and 16, 6 to 7 p.m.)
The brain fair will feature interactive displays to inform, entertain and educate young and old. Fair participants include OHSU neuroscientists and support groups for those who suffer from neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, schizophrenia and stroke. Other displays will feature information about maintaining a healthy mind throughout the aging process.

Featured guest lecturers at OMSI:
Michael Arbib, Ph.D.
Sunday, March 12
7 p.m.

An expert on the parallels between computers and the brain, Arbib, from the University of Southern California, is a nationally recognized neuroscientist. His work with computers and the brain helps explain how the human mind works. His research also helps design better computers using the human brain as a model.


Cythia Kenyon, Ph.D.
Monday, March 13
7 p.m.

Is there a fountain of youth for the brain? Kenyon, from the University of California at San Francisco, has discovered a genetic mutation in worms that could help unlock the secrets to longer, healthier lives in humans. She also will discuss other neurological research that may offer hope to the country's growing aging population.

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