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The Art of Self- Defence (Nature) (click to download)

Daniel Streblow, Ph.D.



The focus of my laboratory is on defining the role of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in the development of vascular disease and chronic rejection of organ allografts. The role of CMV in these diseases is still uncharacterized. My lab will study the following topics: 1) Determining the mechanisms of HCMV-accelerated vascular disease through identification of the viral genes expressed during these diseases using a HCMV microarray chip developed by his laboratory in combination with the Shared Microarray Core at VGTI. Once identified the function of these viral genes will be examined using in vitro and in vivo models of CMV-accelerated vascular disease. 2) Determining the mechanisms of CMV-accelerated vascular disease in both mouse models of atherosclerosis and rat organ transplantation models using a DNA microarray approach. The Streblow lab in conjunction with Dr. Susan Orloff’s laboratory at OHSU has determined RCMV in vivo gene expression in infected rats and has begun functional studies of these genes. 3) Determine viral and host gene expression during the development of atherosclerosis and transplant vascular sclerosis, the vascular lesion associated with chronic allograft rejection 4) determining the mechanisms of viral acceleration of chronic allograft rejection from latently infected donor, which is the most common cause of HCMV-associated disease in transplant patients associated with expression during the different stages of viremia associatated with CMV including 5) Determining the function of CMV-encoded chemokine receptors in the context of viral pathogenesis and acceleration of vascular disease. Dr. Streblow’s was recently awarded an ONPRC pilot project grant to study Chikungunya in a NHP model.



Biography

Dr. Daniel Streblow received his B.S. in Pharmacology/Toxicology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1992. He graduated from University of Wisconsin-Madison with a Ph.D. in Viral Pathogenesis in 1997. Dr. Streblow received a NIH post-doctoral fellowship and worked with Dr. Jay A. Nelson in the Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology at Oregon Health & Science University. He is currently an Assistant Scientist at the Vaccine and Gene Therapy Institute and Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology.