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VGTI in the News

The Art of Self- Defence (Nature) (click to download)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Global News: VGTI AIDS Vaccine 2013
· Sipokazi Fokazi, Cape Argus Times, Experts hopeful for HIV vaccine

· Rod McCullom, Ebony, A "Breakthrough" in AIDS Vaccine Research?

· Paidamoyo Chipunza, The Herald, Zimbabwe: Researchers Claim Aids Vaccine Breakthrough

· Mannasseh Phiri, The Post (Zambia), Reflecting on AIDS vaccine research and my grandchildren

· Gus Cairns, AIDSMap, The monkeys’ tale – how a vaccine might nip HIV in the bud

· Kerry Cullinan, Health-e, Africa: Picker's Monkey Cure is the Talk of the AIDS Vaccine Conference

· BBC news, Vaccine clears HIV-like virus in monkeys

· New York Times, New Hope for HIV Vaccine

· OHSU AIDS vaccine candidate appears to completely clear virus from the body

CREATIVE & NOVEL IDEAS IN HIV RESEARCH AWARD
VGTI researcher receives “Creative and Novel Ideas in HIV Research” award from Nobel Laureate Francoise Barre-Sinosi, who was credited with the joint discovery of the human immunodeficiency virus. July 2013.



NEW HOPE FOR AN AIDS VACCINE

Researchers at OHSU’s Vaccine and Gene Therapy Institute believe they have discovered a promising delivery method to help make an HIV vaccine effective prior to, and perhaps after, infection
A new discovery at Oregon Health & Science University highlights an ingenious method to ensure the body effectively reacts when infected with the highly evasive HIV virus that causes AIDS. The same team of researchers has been utilizing this unique approach to develop its own HIV vaccine candidate, which has so far shown promising results in animal studies. This latest research finding will be published in the May 24, 2013, edition of the journal Science. READ MORE

OHSU research helps explain why an AIDS vaccine has been so difficult to develop
Research highlights why new methods developed at OHSU may be the most promising avenues for fighting the disease. For decades, a successful HIV vaccine has been the Holy Grail for researchers around the globe. Yet despite years of research and millions of dollars of investment, that goal has still yet to be achieved. Recent research by Oregon Health & Science University scientists explains a decades-old mystery as to why slightly weakened versions of the monkey AIDS virus were able to prevent subsequent infection with the fully virulent strain, but were too risky for human use, and why severely compromised or completely inactivated versions of the virus were not effective at all. READ MORE

OHSU receives additional Grand Challenges Explorations funding of novel approach to develop AIDS vaccine that blocks infection
Oregon Health & Science University researchers have received additional funding through Grand Challenges Explorations, an initiative created by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, to conduct AIDS vaccine research. The funding enables individuals worldwide to test unorthodox ideas that address persistent health and development challenges. OHSU’s research funded through a $999,998 grant will take place at the Vaccine and Gene Therapy Institute on OHSU’s West Campus in Beaverton, Ore., and will be led by assistant scientist Jonah Sacha, Ph.D. READ MORE

OHSU Vaccine and Gene Therapy Institute receives Grant for AIDS Vaccine Development
Research supported by Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation will accelerate OHSU’s promising vaccine candidate.
OHSU Vaccine and Gene Therapy Institute receives Grant for AIDS Vaccine Development Researchers at Oregon Health & Science University’s Vaccine and Gene Therapy Institute have been awarded an $8 million grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to further develop a promising HIV vaccine candidate to combat the worldwide AIDS epidemic. READ MORE

Non-Human Primate Studies Reveal Promising Vaccine Approach for HIV
Research conducted at Oregon Health & Science University's Vaccine and Gene Therapy Institute (VGTI) has developed a vaccine candidate in non-human primates that may eventually lead to a vaccine against Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). Details of this advance are published in the advance online edition of the journal Nature. The paper will also be published in an upcoming print addition of the journal. READ MORE

Check out Jonah Sacha and Ben Burwitz's latest Blogs in PQ Monthly:
As the HIV Epidemic Enters its 32nd Year, Where Do We Stand?
The big “C” for HIV?
Fighting HIV with all our HAART