Oregon Health & Science University

 

About OHSU Health

Your family’s well-being is important to us. That’s why OHSU’s Health magazine brings you the latest research news, expert advice and event listings to help you stay current and keep your family healthy. Our magazine is intended to educate and inform: If you have urgent medical issues or in-depth questions, please talk to your health care provider.

Got questions or suggestions? We’d love to hear your feedback: Email us at editor@ohsu.edu

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Research News

Could low-dose aspirin slow the growth of some cancer cells?

Aspirin interferes with the clotting action of the platelets in the blood. Many people with cardiac risks are prescribed a daily low-dose aspirin by their doctors. Among this group of patients, researchers noticed a reduced risk of colorectal cancer and some other types of cancer.

Investigating this difference, OHSU and Oregon State University researchers worked together to study the effects of aspirin on cancer cell growth in lab simulations. Their findings suggest that aspirin’s effect on platelets hinders the survival of tumor cells in the blood stream. Though results aren’t definitive, it is possible aspirin therapy may one day become an effective way to prevent cancer in patients at risk. People should talk to their doctor before taking aspirin or any other medication.

The study was published in the American Journal of Physiology – Cell Physiology.


Plus-size and pregnant? Add activity for healthier moms and babies

Though it is normal to gain as much as 40 pounds when pregnant, what complications can that bring to women who are already over their healthy range? OHSU researchers made a model that shows the positive influence of exercise throughout pregnancy for heavier moms and the health of their babies. The study showed that adding exercise can reduce the risk of developing preeclampsia or gestational diabetes. Both of these conditions can be dangerous and expensive, usually involving treatment and extended hospital stays. Sometimes these conditions can even be fatal for mom or baby.

The result of the study showed the importance of being watchful of moms already over their healthy weight. These moms need to limit their weight gain, and exercise can help achieve that goal. Expectant mothers should talk to their doctors about safe fitness options.

The study was published in the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.


Zika virus stays in the body for more than a month

Even after recovery from the initial infection, the Zika virus remains alive in tissues of the body for up to 35 days, according to a research study by a cross-section of OHSU scientists. The study, done in partnership with the Oregon National Primate Research Center, zeroed in on where in the body the virus hides and for how long. Researchers noted that the virus remained persistent in the genital/urinary tract, multiple lymph nodes, spleen, joints, heart and both the male and female reproductive tracts nearly a month after the original infection. This research will help scientists work toward creating a vaccine. The study results also have important implications for the risks of sexual transmission of the virus and becoming pregnant following exposure.

The study was published in Public Library of Science Pathogens.

Upcoming Events

Request reasonable accommodation for these events at 503-494-2834 or hsmktg@ohsu.edu.


Ask the Health Experts

Join us for informative talks about some of today’s top health concerns. Learn the latest developments in treatment, prevention and detection from the leading professionals in the field. Light refreshments will be served at all seminars.

Physical Therapy Management of Rotator Cuff Injuries

Wednesday, May 31, 2017, 7 p.m.
Your arm is kept in your shoulder socket by your rotator cuff — a group of four muscles that helps you lift and rotate your arm. Join us to learn more about how your rotator cuff works, as well as common injuries and how to treat them. 

Cataract Surgery
Lorinna Lombardi, M.D.
Wednesday, June 21, 2017, 7 p.m.
Are cataracts impacting your quality of life? Learn about the current treatment options for cataracts, the different lens choices and the recovery and healing process after cataract surgery. 

Fertility Preservation
Diana Wu, M.D.
Wednesday, June 28, 2017 7 p.m.
Are you concerned about your fertility as you get older? Sign up and learn more about your options, including elective fertility preservation that uses the latest technologies to freeze your eggs and increase your chances of having biological children later in life.

Learn more and register

Baby Talk, with OHSU Fertility Consultants

Thursday, July 13, 2017
Financial sessions at 5 or 6 p.m.
Meet with fertility experts 5:30 – 7 p.m.
Considering fertility treatment? At OHSU, we offer a full range of fertility services. Want to learn about what choices might be best for you? Join us at an open house. Meet briefly with a fertility expert, get to know our staff, learn about financial options and get your questions answered.

Location:
OHSU Center for Health & Healing
10th Floor, Fertility clinic lobby
3303 S.W. Bond Ave., Portland, OR 97239

Learn more and register

Portland Heart and Stroke Walk
May 20, 2017, 8 a.m.
Portland International Raceway

War on Skin Cancer
May 20, 2017, 9 a.m.
Collaborative Life Sciences Building


Get your Rear in Gear
August 5, 2017, 8 a.m.
Mt. Tabor Park


Health Spotlight

Each issue, we bring timely health tips and information to help you and your family live healthier lives. Got a question or health issue you’d like our experts to address? Email us at editor@ohsu.edu.

May is National Stroke Awareness Month.

Stroke is among the leading causes of death in the United States and the No. 1 cause of adult disability.

What are the warning signs of a stroke?

The most common signs of a stroke are a sudden onset of one or more of the following:

  • Weakness or numbness in the face, arm or leg, especially if only on one side of the body.
  • Confusion; trouble speaking or understanding.
  • Vision problems, including dimness or loss of vision in one or both eyes.
  • Dizziness; loss of balance or coordination.
  • Inability to move or walk normally.
  • Severe headache with no other known cause.

If you experience or witness any of these signs, call 911 immediately. Time is critical in a stroke, so getting someone to medical assistance is urgent.

Information provided by the OHSU Brain Institute’s Stroke Program team, 503-494-8311


Health Spotlight

Each issue, we bring timely health tips and information to help you and your family live healthier lives. Got a question or health issue you’d like our experts to address? Email us at editor@ohsu.edu.

May is National Stroke Awareness Month.

Stroke is among the leading causes of death in the United States and the No. 1 cause of adult disability.

What are the warning signs of a stroke?

The most common signs of a stroke are a sudden onset of one or more of the following:

  • Weakness or numbness in the face, arm or leg, especially if only on one side of the body.
  • Confusion; trouble speaking or understanding.
  • Vision problems, including dimness or loss of vision in one or both eyes.
  • Dizziness; loss of balance or coordination.
  • Inability to move or walk normally.
  • Severe headache with no other known cause.

If you experience or witness any of these signs, call 911 immediately. Time is critical in a stroke, so getting someone to medical assistance is urgent.

Information provided by the OHSU Brain Institute’s Stroke Program team, 503-494-8311



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Fine Print

Health is a quarterly publication of OHSU serving the greater Portland area. Information is intended to educate and is not a substitute for consulting with a health care provider.

Got questions or suggestions? We’d love to hear your feedback: Email us.

If you would like to opt out of receiving the printed version of Health you can do so here.

Editor-in-chief: Heather Pease
Managing editor: Ashley Uchtman
Copywriter: Cheryl Rose
Graphic designer: David Riofrio