MRSA

General

Date Added Resource Source
Oct 2012

Living Near Livestock Raises MRSA Risk

http://ohsonline.com/articles/2012/10/12/living-near-livestock-raises-mrsa-risk.aspx

A new study, reported in OH&S Online, by researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and Dutch colleagues found that regional density of livestock is an important risk factor for people without direct contact with the animals.

(OH&S)
Aug 2011

Hand Sanitizers Carry Unproven Claims to Prevent MRSA Infections

http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm251816.htm

This consumer update, provided by the US Food and Drug Administration, addresses unproven claims regarding hand sanitizers and MRSA.

(FDA)
Aug 2010

Environmental Cleaning & Disinfecting for MRSA

http://www.cdc.gov/mrsa/environment/index.html

This information, provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, addresses the differences between cleaners, sanitizers and disinfectant, and provides recommendations specific to MRSA.

(CDC)
Sep 2008

National MRSA Education Initiative: Preventing MRSA Skin Infections

http://www.cdc.gov/mrsa/mrsa_initiative/skin_infection/mrsa_faqs.html

This information provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention addresses consumer education on MRSA skin infections, photos, information for health care professionals and treatment.

(CDC)
Jan 2008

Community-Associated Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA)

http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dhqp/ar_mrsa_ca.html

MRSA infections that are acquired by persons who have not been recently (within the past year) hospitalized or had a medical procedure (such as dialysis, surgery, catheters) are known as CA-MRSA infections. Staph or MRSA infections in the community are usually manifested as skin infections, such as pimples and boils, and occur in otherwise healthy people.

(CDC)
Jan 2008

Protecting Workers from MRSA Infection

http://ehstoday.com/environment/ehs_imp_75424

In response to public concern over the recent outbreaks of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health addressed the risk of antibiotic-resistant staph infection and transmission in the workplace. This article appears in the October 31, 2007 issue of Occupational Hazards.

(Occupational Hazards)
Jan 2008

MRSA Frequently Asked Questions

http://www.oregon.gov/DHS/ph/acd/diseases/mrsa/facts.shtml

Oregon Department of Human Services Acute and Communicable Disease Prevention addresses common questions and answers related to MRSA.

(OHA)
Oct 2007

NIOSH Safety and Health Topic: MRSA and the Workplace

http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/mrsa/

Staphylococcus aureus, often referred to simply as "staph," is a type of bacteria commonly carried on the skin or in the nose of healthy people. This information is provided for general workplaces, not healthcare facilities. Staph and MRSA can also cause illness in persons outside of hospitals and healthcare facilities. MRSA infections that are acquired by persons who have not been recently (within the past year) hospitalized or had a medical procedure (such as dialysis, surgery, catheters) are known as community-associated MRSA infections.

(NIOSH)
Mar 2005

Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) S urveillance Report 2005

https://public.health.oregon.gov/DiseasesConditions/DiseasesAZ/mrsa/Documents/mrsa05.pdf

Staphylococcus aureus, or more simply "staph," are bacteria that often live in the nose or on the skin of healthy people. When these bacteria penetrate the skin or invade other parts of the body, a staph infection may result. Staph bacteria that are resistant to the action of methicillin and related antibiotics are referred to as "methicillin-resistant staph aureus" or MRSA.

(OHA)