West Nile Virus

General Information

Date Added Resource Source
Jul 2008

West Nile Virus Activity - United States 2007

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5726a2.htm

West Nile virus (WNV) is the leading cause of arboviral encephalitis in the United States. Originally identified in Africa in 1937, WNV was first detected in the western hemisphere in 1999 in New York City. Since then, WNV has caused seasonal epidemics of febrile illness and neurologic disease in the United States. This report summarizes national WNV surveillance data for 2007.

(CDC)
Nov 2004

Oregon Department of Human Services West Nile Virus Activity

http://oregon.gov/DHS/ph/acd/diseases/wnile/survey.shtml

With mosquito control agencies and local county health departments around the state, Oregon Health Services is testing adult mosquitoes and birds for mosquito-borne encephalitis.

(OHA)
Nov 2004

West Nile Virus Resource Guide by the National Pesticide Information Center

http://npic.orst.edu/wnv/

NPIC developed this resource guide as a source of available information on the West Nile Virus and pesticide-related topics.

(NPIC)
Feb 2003

West Nile Virus Info from the Multnomah County Health Dept

http://web.multco.us/health/west-nile-virus
(MCHD)
Dec 2002

West Nile Virus Overview

http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/westnile/

The West Nile virus (WNV) is a virus transmitted by mosquitoes to other animals through a mosquito bite. The virus is commonly found in Africa, West Asia, and the Middle East. It was first reported in the United States in New York State in the summer of 1999. As of October 21, 2002, it has been detected in 43 States and the District of Columbia in the United States...

(NIOSH)
Dec 2002

West Nile Virus Basics

http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvbid/westnile/index.htm

Prevention Information, Case Information, About the Virus...

(CDC)
Dec 2002

West Nile Virus Information from Oregon Public Health Services

http://public.health.oregon.gov/DiseasesConditions/DiseasesAZ/Pages/disease.aspx?did=8

West Nile virus is carried by mosquitoes and can infect humans, horses, and birds. Most infections are mild, with fever and flu-like symptoms, but more severe infections may cause encephalitis (inflammation of the brain), and rarely, death...

(OHA)