Posts Tagged ‘preceptorship’


One of the big draws to OHSU for me was the preceptorship program. I was a medical scribe for 2 years previous to medical school, and I love clinical medicine. You meet all kinds of wonderful and interesting people, and although science is somewhat predictable, people are highly variable. So, I was super excited to start my preceptorship and get some patient contact. My preceptor is a pediatric neurosurgeon. I was initially disappointed, as she … Read More

What is a preceptorship?

That was the exact question I was asking myself when I started medical school and even up until my first day at the clinic. There isn’t a very good definition on Wikipedia and it’s definitely not in ye ole trusted Miriam Webster. Even asking older students led to a multitude of definitions ranging from “glorified shadowing” to “being a doctor’s assistant.” Both of which were not entirely satisfying. It wasn’t until I started a couple … Read More

T-minus 2000 hours

Prior to PA school, I primarily worked as a pathology technician performing gross dissections (in the macroscopic sense, but often in the literal sense too) of human tissue in Anatomic Pathology. I could slice my way through gallbladders like it was nobody’s business, releasing that sludgy green-brown material known as bile that lets french fries, cheese and everything sacred exist in my diet. I could describe every minute detail of a perforated appendix on my … Read More



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