Posts Tagged ‘MS3’


Originally published on The Biopsy. “Are your ready to see this patient?” asked my attending. This patient was a young mother-to-be, otherwise healthy with her first baby on the way. I had hardly conducted any prenatal checks myself nor led a gynecological exam. I was vaguely familiar with the questions I should ask and distantly comfortable with the physical exam maneuvers I was to perform. I had done them before, once, in a time that seemed … Read More

Tomorrow’s lessons

Dear ——–, You were my patient for four days. On the first day, we treated your many diseases. On the second day, we removed all but comfort measures. When I arrive at the hospital tomorrow, you will not be there. My boyfriend worries about me tonight, as you are my first patient to die. I am surprised to tell him that I feel only gratitude for you. Thank you for being my first patient to … Read More

The question we all know is coming

I am halfway through my third year of medical school and so far, I absolutely love it. I feel one thousand times more like a doctor than I did six months ago, and I’ve learned more in these six months that I had in the six years prior. And I’m not just saying that – third year is high yield beyond belief. By this point, we’ve all answered the golden question hundreds of times. Everybody asks it … Read More

Algorithmic Medicine

C++, JavaScript, HTML5. These languages are the backbones to the computer programs we take for granted every day. My mom, a software engineer, will repurpose symbols and codes into commands that yield computer applications and webpages. What is software? No idea. But what I do know is that there are commands and functions that allow a user to interact with the computer and perform specific tasks. To me, medicine seemed like the furthest thing from … Read More



Ever wondered what life is like as a student at OHSU? What does it take to become a researcher? Just how gross is gross anatomy? Welcome to the blog that answers these – and many other – questions. It’s students writing first-hand about their commitment to careers in science and health care. It’s honest about the challenges as well as the joys. It’s not always pretty. But it is our story. Thank you for sharing it with us. And please, let us know what you think.

Participation Guidelines

Remember: information you share here is public; it isn't medical advice. Need advice or treatment? Contact your healthcare provider directly. Read our Terms of Use and this disclaimer for details.