School of Medicine x School of Nursing

I was recently visiting the Midwest for a residency interview at one of the major Pediatrics program in the region. During a presentation about the program by one of the current chief residents, an interesting remark was made in regards to how rounds were being conducted throughout the hospital. She stated that pediatric rounds were family-centered, with the nursing team present as well (nothing new, and something that is done here at our fine institution). However, she then said that this was a policy that was being adopted across the hospital, and across specialties. Naturally, I blurted out “even surgeons?” No offense Team Surgery, but I know how busy your days are and how fast your rounds can be, and frankly it may take longer to find the patient’s nurse than to assess the patient’s condition. Admittedly, the chief resident said it has taken some extra time to convince certain physicians more than others about the need to comply with this new policy. It was at this moment that I realized that one of the ways to change the outlook on the importance of integrating the whole care team into patient rounds, is to conduct an educational intervention during medical school…

Fortunately, OHSU is beginning to do just that with the Integrative Educational elective that is being offered this March (3/1-3/15) to 4th year medical students. It’s a two-week elective entitled “Interprofessional Collaboration: a Dynamic Model for Contemporary Practice” that is being held in conjunction with the School of Nursing. The aim for the elective is to bring a newfound educational approach to team-building, and incorporates different facets of healthcare education into its curriculum (including ethics, communication, leadership, quality improvement, amongst others). This is a relatively new approach to medical education in the US, but it is something that has been rolled out with great success in Europe and Australia. It will undoubtedly be integrated with the future OHSU medical curriculum, particularly in light of the campus move to South Waterfront, with the other Health Professional schools.

I encourage my fellow 4th years to register for this elective! I think it’s quite possible that if you’re taking a different 4th year elective at this time, that you’ll be able to also complete this elective simultaneously if it is discussed with the each respective elective coordinator. Here’s a summary of the details:

Dates: March 5th-15th
Time: Mon-Friday, 1-5 pm daily
Credits: 2
Contact: Mary Anna Gordon, DNP RN gordonma@ohsu.edu
Patrick Brunett, MD brunettp@ohsu.edu

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Comments

  1. Yassar: I am sitting in the School of Nursing at this moment, drafting an operating plan for the School’s engagement with its alumni.

    One of the questions spinning in my mind is how to ensure that the uniquenesses and traditions of each school and program are observed and honored in our alumni activities, while still allowing the overlaps that clearly exist to be also recognized and celebrated.

    It is tremendously exciting to see this kind of collaboration happening at the curriculum level, and it only adds to my deep interest in mirroring these initiatives in our programming where and when we can.

    Thank you for writing about it.

  2. Great information here. Thanks for sharing!

  3. This is a great article – thanks for the information!

  4. There are still some open slots for interprofessional minded 4th year med students and 4th year nursing students. If you are interested in participating in this groundbreaking course, one of the first of its kind here at OHSU, please contact Mary Anna Gordon, DNP RN at gordonma@ohsu.edu, or Patrick Brunett, MD at brunettp@ohsu.edu.

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StudentSpeak

StudentSpeak

Ever wondered what life is like as a student at OHSU? What does it take to become a researcher? Just how gross is gross anatomy? Welcome to the blog that answers these – and many other – questions. It’s students writing first-hand about their commitment to careers in science and health care. It’s honest about the challenges as well as the joys. It’s not always pretty. But it is our story. Thank you for sharing it with us. And please, let us know what you think.

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