Posts Tagged ‘OHSU Researchers’

Researchers discuss out-of-hospital births in NEJM online forum starting Jan. 6

The NEJM Group Open Forum, a live, online discussion intended to generate conversation around important (and sometimes controversial) ideas, will feature a trio of OHSU researchers for the next 10 days. Jonathan Snowden, Ph.D., Aaron Caughey, M.D., Ph.D., and Ellen Tilden, Ph.D., C.N.M., whose article about out-of-hospital births and birth outcomes is at the center of the current forum, will each log in daily to respond to comments and questions asked by the online community. See what others are saying … Read More

OHSU study sheds light on risks of giving birth in and out of a hospital setting

The out-of-hospital birth rate in Oregon is the highest of any state (4%) and nationally, more and more women are choosing to give birth at home. This national trend has drawn increased attention to an ongoing debate over whether it’s safe to give birth in an out-of-hospital setting. A new study published the Dec. 31 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine by OHSU researchers provides detailed answers to shed light on the issue. The … Read More

OHSU researchers find cognitive dysfunction resulting from obesity, diabetes can be treated

Brief Reduction in Dietary Fat Improves Cognitive Dysfunction in Mice with Obesity and Type II Diabetes OHSU researchers, led by Jacob Raber, Ph.D., have discovered that the cognitive dysfunction that that often results from obesity and type II diabetes can be treated.  The study reveals that even a brief reduction in dietary fat content in mice that are fed a high-fat diet for a substantial period of time led to a complete rescue of cognitive function. … Read More

Hope for MS patients through understanding roots of the disease in monkeys

New research led by Scott W. Wong, Ph.D., senior scientist, Vaccine and Gene Therapy Institute; interim division chief, Division of Pathobiology and Immunology at the Oregon National Primate Research Center; and professor, OHSU’s Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, describes the similarities between multiple sclerosis and a unique, spontaneous paralytic disease that occurs in nonhuman primates. This model opens the door to discovering the mechanisms driving MS in humans. The model, called Japanese macaque encephalomyelitis, … Read More

Training Opportunity for Responsible Conduct of Research

Are you participating in an NIH training grant award or fellowship? Do you need RCR training? The Oregon Clinical and Translational Research Institute (OCTRI) is offering an 8-hour seminar that meets RCR requirements for Ks, Ts, and other career development or individual fellowship grants. This seminar is an interactive and practical experience  focused on addressing real issues that have arisen in the course of your research. These may be related to ethics, integrity, or regulatory … Read More

Researchers discover a network of genes that control when puberty begins

Researchers at OHSU and the University of Pittsburgh have identified members of an elaborate superfamily of genes that regulate the timing of puberty in highly evolved nonhuman primates. The Zinc finger, or ZNF, gene family comprises approximately 800 individual genes. A handful of genes in this network serve as a “neurobiological brake” that delay the activation of hypothalamic genes responsible for launching puberty until the end of childhood, thereby preventing the premature awakening of the process. The … Read More

OHSU Doernbecher researchers receive Gates Foundation grant to advance tuberculosis vaccine research

David Lewinsohn, M.D., Ph.D., in the Papé Family Pediatric Research Institute at OHSU Doernbecher Children’s Hospital, has been awarded a $3 million grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to study whether a particular group of infection-fighting cells, known as T cells, may be viable for the development of a vaccine aimed at combatting the global tuberculosis epidemic. According to the World Health Organization’s 2015 global report, TB claimed 1.5 million lives in 2014 … Read More

Murine CRISPR/Cas9 pilot program updates

CRISPR/ Cas9 gene editing is rapidly becoming the state of the art for mouse genome engineering. During the last year, the OHSU Transgenic Mouse Models Core has successfully used this technology to generate both targeted gene knock-outs and point mutation knock-ins for its clients. The Transgenic Mouse Models Core has revised its CRISPR pricing structure for 2016. Non-homologous end joining-based gene knock-outs for OHSU investigators will be $2100 per project (150 injections), with the user … Read More

Who’s new at OHSU? Marina Guizzetti, Ph.D.

Marina Guizzetti, Ph.D., is an associate professor in the Department of Behavioral Neuroscience at OHSU and a research biologist with the Portland VA Health Care System. Her research focuses on the neurodevelopmental effects of alcohol on the developing brain, specifically looking at Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders. Where are you from originally? I’m from northern Italy and also where I was educated. I got my degree at the University of Pavia just south of Milan. This … Read More

Announcing Data Science forums for OHSU researchers

Do you have an opinion about the future of data science or research informatics at OHSU? If so, this is your chance to provide input for OHSU’s new data science initiative. OHSU will be investing in clinical and research informatics in the next several years, and the institution wants to hear from you about what is needed to succeed. You’re invited to attend a series of three, 90-minute forums across campus to solicit input from … Read More

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