Posts Tagged ‘OHSU Researchers’

von Gersdorff team sheds light on how diabetes triggers blindness

A new study published in Neuron,  led by Henrique von Gersdorff, Ph.D., is the first characterization of a group of specialized synapses in the retina, the part of the eye that captures and transmits visual signals. These specialized synapses are inhibitory synapses that reduce the activity (or normal ‘chatter’) between neurons connected by multiple excitatory synapses. von Gersdorff and his team–Veeramuthu Balakrishnan, Theresa Puthussery, Mean-Hwan Kim, and W. Rowland Taylor–from the Vollum and Casey Eye … Read More

Who’s new at OHSU? Pamela Cassidy, Ph.D.

Pamela Cassidy, Ph.D., is a research associate professor in the Department of Dermatology at OHSU. Her research focus is on melanoma chemoprevention – developing agents that ameliorate the pathophysiological processes resulting from ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Where were you before coming to OHSU? I was at the University of Utah. I did my graduate and postdoc work there and then spent the last 15 years at the University of Utah’s Huntsman Cancer Institute. So, in total, … Read More

Who’s new at OHSU? Maros Ferencik, M.D., Ph.D.

Maros Ferencik, M.D., Ph.D., is a clinical scientist whose research focus is cardiac imaging. He joined the faculty at OHSU in January 2014. Where are you from originally? Slovakia. I went through medical school and earned my Ph.D. there. Where were you before coming to OHSU? I did my initial medical training in Slovakia for three and half years. During that time, I also spent a year on a research fellowship at the University of … Read More

Who’s new at OHSU? Shawn Chavez, Ph.D.

Shawn Chavez, Ph.D., is an assistant scientist in the Division of Reproductive and Developmental Sciences at the Oregon National Primate Research Center and an assistant professor in the OHSU School of Medicine Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Physiology and Pharmacology. Her paper “Prediction model for aneuploidy in early human embryo development revealed by single-cell analysis” was published online on July 7, 2015, in Nature Communications. Where were you before coming to OHSU? I came … Read More

New insights on protein movement from the Chapman lab

A study from the Michael Chapman lab titled “Parsimony in protein conformational change,” published in the journal Structure, provides a more complete picture of how proteins move. The researchers used nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to better understand the dynamics of protein movement and thus get a better view of their normal functioning. The team designed a computer method that looks at two different snapshots of the same protein structures. Some of the findings: Minimal torsion … Read More

New Science paper from the Skach Lab sheds light on protein folding

A recent paper published in Science may change how we think about how protein folding in its endogenous context.  For the past 50 years, the principles by which proteins unfold and refold have been studied largely using purified recombinant substrates.  Under these experimental conditions, however, it has been extraordinarily difficult to examine how a protein folds in its native environment.  To address this question, the Skach Lab developed a novel technique that uses fluorescence resonance … Read More

Michael Cohen, Ph.D., named Pew Scholar

Hot off last week’s Industry Spotlight comes more news about Michael Cohen: he has been named to the 2015 class of Pew Scholars. The Pew Scholars are selected each year by the Pew Charitable Trusts–the program supports the research of young investigators who demonstrate exceptional potential in biomedical research.  This important award reflects Cohen’s promise as a researcher and innovator. His research concerns how ADP-ribosyltransferases affect learning, memory, and other brain functions. He is engineering these … Read More

Research Week: New Faculty Lightning Rounds today!

What new research is under way at OHSU? What will be the next big thing to come out of an OHSU lab? We asked all faculty members hired since January 2013 to join us at Research Week to share their exciting new work with the rest of the research community. New to Research Week in 2015, this event allows faculty members new to the university to showcase their project or program in a five-minute, one-slide presentation. … Read More

The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute seeks input on research priorities

The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) is looking for input from scientists–and the public–to help shape its funding priorities. If you’re funded by NHLBI, or hope to be, or if you benefit from the several hundred million dollars per year that they spend on biomedical research–in short, if you are living and breathing, this is your opportunity to shape the research of the future. Specifically, they want to identify the most compelling questions … Read More

The art of science: Submit your prettiest data to Research Week

Last week, we asked for your ugliest…. This week, we want to see the most beautiful data to come out of a lab at OHSU. Throughout Research Week, your most aesthetically pleasing works of science will be featured on display in the old library for all to appreciate. At the end of the week, there will be a drawing from the pool of participants for tickets to the Portland Art Museum or the Portland International … Read More

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Welcome to the Research News Blog

OHSU Research News is your portal to information about all things research at Oregon Health & Science University. Visit often for updates on events, discoveries, and important funding information.

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