Posts Tagged ‘OHSU researchers’

Oral antibiotics after C-section may reduce infection risk for obese women

The rate of obesity among U.S. women has been increasing, and obesity is associated with an increased risk of surgical-site infection following cesarean delivery. Research by Amy Valent, D.O., assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology in the School of Medicine, and colleagues at the University of Cincinnati found that the rate of infection for women who received additional oral antibiotics after delivery was 6.4 percent. Women in the placebo group had a 15.4 percent rate … Read More

Motor neurons aren’t the only site for restoring locomotive function

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is the most common adult onset motor neuron disease for which there is no cure or treatment that significantly extends life. ALS causes the death of neurons that control voluntary muscles and is characterized by gradually worsening weakness, loss of motor function and, when the individual can no longer breathe, death. The only FDA-approved drug used to treat ALS prolongs on average the lifetime of a patient by two to three months. A feature in neurodegenerative diseases, including about 90 percent … Read More

OCTRI receives $37 million grant from the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences

The National Institutes of Health has named OHSU’s Oregon Clinical & Translational Research Institute a recipient of 2017 Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) grant. OCTRI was an original recipient of the program in 2006, and the new award provides more than $37 million in federal funding to support the Institute’s work over the next five years. OCTRI helps accelerate the translation of research into clinical use, medical practice and health policy, with the goal of improving the health of the … Read More

New findings show retinal development requires the protein dystroglycan

OHSU scientists have published a paper that provides new information on retinal development and visual system abnormalities present in dystroglycanopathy, a form of muscular dystrophy that results from defective function of the protein dystroglycan. Patients with severe forms of dystroglycanopathy frequently experience visual system problems in addition to other neurodevelopmental abnormalities. There is some understanding of dystroglycan’s influence on brain development, but its role in regulating retinal development has remained poorly understood. A team led … Read More

Study suggests cosmic rays pose long-term risks for astronauts

For astronauts on long missions in deep space, the brain’s response to radiation exposure is an important concern. Cognitive and other impairments put crews at risk during space travel and may pose significant health hazards to space flight crews for years after a mission. A unique feature of the space radiation environment is the presence of galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events, both of which involve protons. Exposure to these will likely impact multiple … Read More

Research advocacy update: Owen McCarty represents Oregon at the American Heart Association You’re the Cure event

Owen McCarty, Ph.D.,FAHA, represented Oregon in a Washington D.C. research advocacy event in July. He joined a group of 330 advocates who met with 284 legislative offices as part of the 2017 American Heart Association You’re the Cure on the Hill. The team from Oregon included two patient advocates, Jane Staniford and Kellie Hill (pictured), as well as the Oregon AHA Director of Government Relations & Affairs, Christina Bodamer (left). They had a chance to meet with … Read More

Tracing the mechanisms of pain and empathy for pain

A new study finds a potential neural overlap between physically induced and socially transferred increased sensitivity to pain, or hyperalgesia. Previous research has shown that pain sensitivity associated with alcohol withdrawal can be communicated to nearby individuals by olfactory cues. But how this social transfer of pain occurs is not known. Scientists at OHSU have now demonstrated that pain and empathy for pain activate partially overlapping regions of the brain in mice and that those … Read More

Sex matters: OHSU researchers shine light on mechanisms of ischemic stroke

Sex—like age, weight, and underlying health conditions—is a biological variable that is often a critical factor when it comes to health. However, sex has been largely absent in research and this has led to an incomplete understanding of sex-based differences in disease processes and treatment therapies that are appropriate for men and women. Ischemic stroke is one of the diseases for which a lack of preclinical data on male and female subjects presents a critical … Read More

Arthur Vandenbark and team find treatment dose for MS is sex dependent

One of the main challenges in treating multiple sclerosis is reversing the effects of accumulated damage to the central nervous system. Damage to myelin, which coats and protects axons, and chronic axonal loss due to the absence of myelin are hallmarks of the disease. Most of the available drugs for MS are anti-inflammatory and used to treat the most common type of MS: relapsing-remitting. It is not clear to what extent these drugs help repair … Read More

High-fat diet in pregnancy can cause increased respiratory problems in children

By the time they are six, half of all children in the United States require medical attention because of wheezing and other respiratory symptoms. New research conducted at OHSU and published in Physiological Reports demonstrated that a maternal diet high in saturated fat plays a key role in programming airway hyperreactivity—a hallmark of asthma—in their offspring. Using a mouse model, this research supported findings in observational studies that associate maternal obesity and early life wheezing … Read More

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