Posts Tagged ‘Discoveries’

OHSU publication selected for the Journal of Biological Chemistry’s “Paper of the Week”

A publication by Pei-Chun Chen, Ph.D., postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, and her mentor, Show-Ling Shyng, Ph.D., has been selected as a “Paper of the Week” by the Journal of Biological Chemistry. The paper, “Leptin Regulates KATP Channel Trafficking in Pancreatic β-cells by a Signaling Mechanism Involving AMPK and PKA,” was highlighted online and in the Nov. 22 print version of the journal. Additionally, a figure from the paper was selected for … Read More

Gouaux Lab lays foundation for improved antidepressants

New research from the lab of Eric Gouaux, Ph.D., senior scientist at OHSU’s Vollum Institute and Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator, reveals how neurotransmitters in the brain interact with antidepressants. These findings were published in the November 7 edition of Nature. The first paper, “X-ray structure of dopamine transporter elucidates antidepressant mechanism,” uses structural biology techniques to improve our understanding of the dopamine transporter. These new insights about the structure of the dopamine transporter may help … Read More

Inventive OHSU postdoc “traps” scientific creativity to solve problems

From a young age, Lulu Cambronne, Ph.D., has always been interested in trying new things. For example, as a young musician she enjoyed composing works that explored hybrids of classical and modern sounds. Today, as a scientist at OHSU’s Vollum Institute, Dr. Cambronne is still harnessing her creativity and using it to develop solutions to difficult scientific problems. As a postdoc in Dr. Richard Goodman’s lab, one of Dr. Cambronne’s inspired ideas became tangible while … Read More

OHSU scientists report major breakthrough in embryonic stem cells

Stem cells are thought to hold promise for treating degenerative diseases such as multiple sclerosis and heart disease. But finding a source of embryonic stem cells, which can be reprogrammed into any other cell type, has been an obstacle to progress in developing such treatments. Now OHSU’s Shoukhrat Mitalipov, Ph.D, and his team have developed a process that transforms human skin cells into embryonic stem cells. This successful reprogramming utilizes somatic nuclear transfer. The Mitalipov lab is the … Read More

Doernbecher researchers first to grow transplantable liver stem cells in culture

“Liver stem cell therapy for humans is coming,” said Markus Grompe, M.D., director of the  Papé Family Pediatric Research Institute and co-author of a new Nature paper that describes how a team of researchers was able to successfully grow mouse liver stem cells in culture for the first time. The cells were then transplanted into a mouse model for liver disease, where they had a modest therapeutic effect. In the study, researchers used a modified version … Read More

Epigenetic research helps explain early-onset puberty in females

Researchers at the Oregon National Primate Research Center (ONPRC) have published findings on the role of epigenetics in the control of puberty in females. The paper, published in the early online edition of Nature Neuroscience, explains how an epigenetic mechanism operating in the hypothalamus can regulate the timing of puberty. Using female rats, the researchers were able to determine that a group of proteins, called Polycomb Group (PcG) proteins, inhibit the activity of a gene known as Kiss1. When PcG protein levels … Read More

Could ocean-dwelling creatures lead us to powerful new medications?

OHSU researcher Margo Haygood, Ph.D., and collaborators from the Philippine Mollusk Symbiont International Cooperative Biodiversity Group have recently discovered two unexpected sources for new antibiotics and painkillers. In a paper published this month in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the researchers describe how the bacteria used by shipworms to convert wood into food produce a powerful antibiotic. According to Dr. Haygood, finding new sources of antibiotics is critical because current antibiotics are … Read More

OHSU researchers successfully test new gene therapy in human cells

Imagine knowing that your child is at risk for inheriting a genetic condition. Now imagine being able to fix the genetic defect before the child is even born. This may sound like something out of science fiction, but we’re one step closer to it being reality thanks to researchers here at Oregon Health & Science University. Shoukhrat Mitalipov, Ph.D., associate scientist in the Division of Reproductive & Developmental Sciences at the Oregon National Primate Research … Read More

New technique to determine particle mass based on optical imaging

OHSU Department of Biomedical Engineering researchers have developed a new technique that can determine the mass of a microscopic particle just by its appearance. An article detailing the work, headed by biomedical engineering postdoctoral fellow Kevin Phillips, Ph.D., was published this month in the Physical Review Letter. The new technique, called tomographic bright field imaging or TBFI, will allow researchers to perform mass measurements on a cellular level using standard laboratory microscopes. Other OHSU researchers … Read More

Why is developing an AIDS vaccine so difficult?

Over the years, scientists have developed a myriad of vaccines, some of which have eradicated the world’s most dangerous diseases. So why is an AIDS vaccine still so elusive? New research by OHSU’s Louis Picker, M.D., published online in Nature Medicine, explains. Dr. Picker likens our search for an AIDS vaccine to the tale of ‘Goldilocks and the Three Bears’: “The field was looking for a vaccine that was ‘not too hot,’ or ‘not too … Read More

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Welcome to the Research News Blog

OHSU Research News is your portal to information about all things research at Oregon Health & Science University. Visit often for updates on events, discoveries, and important funding information.

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