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NIH simplifies the process for late applications

The National Institutes of Health has updated and simplified its policy on submitting late applications, beginning with applications due January 25, 2015 or later. They have added a two week window after the due date during which a request to accept a late application may be considered, and they have eliminated the previous practice of assigning different late application windows to different funding mechanisms, or in some cases, not allowing them at all. Now, all … Read More

OHSU Researchers: New Subrecipient Committment Form

More news from OPAM: The new Subrecipient Commitment Form is complete and can be found on the Research Development & Administration Forms Page,   with accompanying guidance.  As discussed at several RAIN presentations, this new form will replace the Letter of Intent currently required for grant proposal submissions that include outgoing subaward agreements.  Currently, most other institutions are using a version of this form;  it is considered an industry standard and is expected by many sponsors … Read More

Important InfoEd information for OHSU researchers: changes to key personnel process

This just in from the OHSU Office of Proposal and Award Management: effective Monday, December 15th, if a proposal includes key personnel from a different department with at least 5% effort, it can be routed as Information Only to the key person, their department chair or unit head, and their dean or director. This is a significant change to the previous requirement  to route the proposal for Approval.  The Information Only route will notify individuals … Read More

NIH supplemental funding opportunity: Adding gender factors to study considerations

The Office of Research on Women’s Health (ORWH) has announced the availability of administrative supplements to NIH-funded researchers to encourage the consideration of sex/gender factors in their ongoing research. If you currently have NIH funding under one of the following mechanisms, you may be eligible : P01, P20, P30, P50, P60, PM1, U10, U19, U54, U56, UM1, DP!, DP2, DP3, DP4, DP5/UP5, RM1, R01, R15, R37, and U01. The proposed research must address at least one objective from Goals … Read More

NIH is really, truly implementing the new biosketch format

While you were enjoying your holidays, Sally Rockey announced last week that the NIH really, truly is implementing the new 5-page biosketch format with the annotated bibliography section detailing the importance of your contributions to science. This format applies to projects beginning in 2016, but that means applications with due dates as early as January 2015–so it’s not too soon to start preparing. This change will require you to spend some time thinking about, rewriting, … Read More

Knight Cancer Institute trio to lecture on future of biomedical research, Nov. 11

Joe Gray, Ph.D., associate director of translational research for the Knight Cancer Institute and director of the Center for Spatial Systems Biomedicine, will join Knight Cancer Institute researcher Summer Gibbs, Ph.D., assistant professor in the department of biomedical engineering, and Joseph Carroll, Ph.D., director of business development for the Knight Cancer Institute, to discuss how multi-institution, public-private partnerships are being developed and how they are advancing the research of complex biological systems. Tuesday, Nov. 11 7:30 p.m.  … Read More

New method improves gene therapy outcomes

A new study recently published in Nature identifies a method for site-specific gene addition that may reduce adverse effects and lead to safe and more effective gene targeting. The study, conducted by researchers at Stanford and UCSF, was performed on mice with hemophilia B and demonstrated reduced bleeding in the mice and minimal side effects typically associated with other gene addition methods.

New, free software simplifies cell tracking

Recent advances in imaging technology allow researchers to capture snapshots of embryonic cells as they divide and migrate through development. But capturing an image of a growing embryo every 30 seconds or so, produces terabytes of data that is time consuming to analyze. A team led by HHMI, Janelia Group Leader, Philipp Keller, Ph.D., has created a piece of software that identifies and tracks dividing cells as quickly as high-speed microscopes can collect the images. … Read More

Present your Ph.D. research through interpretive dance

The “Dance your Ph.D.” contest challenges scientists around the world to explain their Ph.D. research without a PowerPoint or jargon–in fact, no talking at all. So if you’re tired of trying to explain what your Ph.D. research is about to friends and relatives, only to have their eyes glaze over, this contest may be for you! Winners of the 7th annual contest sponsored by Science, AAAS (publisher of Science), and HighWire Press, were announced November … Read More

Oregon Hearing Research Center Seminar, Oct. 31: Karl R. Koehler, Ph.D.

Karl R. Koehler, Ph.D., will give a lecture titled “Modeling Inner Ear Organogenesis with Stem Cells,” sponsored by the Oregon Hearing Research Center. Dr. Koehler is a postdoctoral fellow at Indiana University School of Medicine in the department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. His paper, “Generation of inner ear sensory epithelia from pluripotent stem cells in 3D culture,” was published in Nature in 2013. Friday, Oct. 31, 4 p.m., Vollum M1441. You can read more … Read More

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Welcome to the Research News Blog

OHSU Research News is your portal to information about all things research at Oregon Health & Science University. Visit often for updates on events, discoveries, and important funding information.

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