Research Policy Board proposed to ease regulatory burden on research universities

More research administration news: If there’s one thing that political opponents in Washington DC can agree on, at least in theory, is that research is over-regulated. Study after study after study has shown that research faculty spend about 40% of their time performing administrative duties, many of which are related to research regulations (think effort reporting) that are perceived to get in the way of actual discovery–the thing that scientists are funded to actually spend … Read More

Precision medicine enters a new phase

It takes a million people to discern the health strategies for one individual–at least, that’s the thinking behind the latest phase of the NIH’s Precision Medicine Initiative. This initiative was first proposed by NIH Director Francis Collins more than a decade ago. It became a reality this January, when President Obama announced his support of it in his State of the Union address, noting that its goal is “to bring us closer to curing diseases … Read More

Update on NIH Voluntary Cost Sharing at OHSU

PIs are sometimes tempted to ask for institutional commitment for NIH grants when it’s not required–they may believe that such pot-sweeteners improve their chance for funding success. But OHSU recently changed its policy regarding cost-sharing:  As of July 1, 2015 the new OHSU policy no longer allows voluntary cost-sharing. Why did we make this change? Because NIH itself has changed  how cost-sharing is reported on the cover page of your proposal for funding.  They did … Read More

Community Conversation series resumes Aug. 25

Join the Northwest Association for Biomedical Research for the next installment in the 2015 Community Conversations series: “You are what you eat: antibiotic resistance from chickens to your table.” The event will explore the connection between chickens and human health with a discussion on how the use of antibiotics in large scale chicken farming impacts the economy and our health. The discussion will be co-facilitated by Kathy Hessler, J.D., LL.M, Lewis & Clark Law School and Emma … Read More

von Gersdorff team sheds light on how diabetes triggers blindness

A new study published in Neuron,  led by Henrique von Gersdorff, Ph.D., is the first characterization of a group of specialized synapses in the retina, the part of the eye that captures and transmits visual signals. These specialized synapses are inhibitory synapses that reduce the activity (or normal ‘chatter’) between neurons connected by multiple excitatory synapses. von Gersdorff and his team–Veeramuthu Balakrishnan, Theresa Puthussery, Mean-Hwan Kim, and W. Rowland Taylor–from the Vollum and Casey Eye … Read More

Inaugural Director of the NIH Division of Biomedical Research Workforce Programs appointed

Kay Lund, Ph.D. will join NIH this August as the inaugural director of the NIH Division of Biomedical Research Workforce Programs. In this newly created role, Lund will oversee and guide NIH’s training and development programs aimed at establishing a highly qualified biomedical workforce. Lund arrives at NIH from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where she held the endowed Sarah Graham Kenan Professorship in Cell Biology and Physiology, with joint appointments as … Read More

Students and post-docs, apply now to attend OpenCon 2015!

As part of a year-long series of grant funded campus events focused on scientific communication and open science, the OHSU Library is sponsoring a full scholarship for one OHSU student or postdoc to attend OpenCon 2015 in Brussels, Belgium, November 14 – 16. OpenCon is a student and early career researcher conference on Open Access, Open Data, and Open Education. Through keynotes, panel discussions, workshops, and hackathons, attendees will build knowledge, skills, and relationships that … Read More

Considering sex as a biological variable; new NIH requirement effective Jan. 2016

Women comprise slightly more than half of the population–and their representation is relatively well balanced in NIH-sponsored clinical research, where they now account for roughly half of all participants. But this shift has not occurred in the preclinical realm. Today, most NIH-sponsored animal studies are focused on males, and many investigators do not report on the sex of the subjects from whom cells are obtained for cell line work. This lack of balance may obscure … Read More

New Science paper from the Skach Lab sheds light on protein folding

A recent paper published in Science may change how we think about how protein folding in its endogenous context.  For the past 50 years, the principles by which proteins unfold and refold have been studied largely using purified recombinant substrates.  Under these experimental conditions, however, it has been extraordinarily difficult to examine how a protein folds in its native environment.  To address this question, the Skach Lab developed a novel technique that uses fluorescence resonance … Read More

NIGMS wants to hear from you!

The National Institute of General Medical Sciences examining innovative ways to best support biomedical researchers. Last week we reported on NIGMS’s new funding mechanism for early-career scientists and now they’re seeking input on how best to foster technology development for the research community. More specifically, the Institute is asking for information on the need for development of technologies and the relationship of technology development to other biomedical research. Of particular interest are ideas about: The value … Read More

Welcome to the Research News Blog

Welcome to the Research News Blog

OHSU Research News is your portal to information about all things research at Oregon Health & Science University. Visit often for updates on events, discoveries, and important funding information.

Participation Guidelines

Remember: information you share here is public; it isn't medical advice. Need advice or treatment? Contact your healthcare provider directly. Read our Terms of Use and this disclaimer for details.