Discoveries

Mouse model developed at OHSU leads to breakthrough in malaria research

In 2007, OHSU’s Markus Grompe, M.D., and collaborators, developed an animal model for studying a human-specific parasite that causes malaria. Just recently, this mouse model was used by investigators at Seattle Biomedical Research Institute to gain a better understanding of how proteins are expressed in the liver during infection. Their research was published online in the Journal of Clinical Investigation. The technology was licensed to Yecuris Corporation back in 2007, a biotech company founded by … Read More

Why is developing an AIDS vaccine so difficult?

Over the years, scientists have developed a myriad of vaccines, some of which have eradicated the world’s most dangerous diseases. So why is an AIDS vaccine still so elusive? New research by OHSU’s Louis Picker, M.D., published online in Nature Medicine, explains. Dr. Picker likens our search for an AIDS vaccine to the tale of ‘Goldilocks and the Three Bears’: “The field was looking for a vaccine that was ‘not too hot,’ or ‘not too … Read More

OHSU study advances understanding of TDP-43 protein in ALS

A new study by researchers at the OHSU School of Dentistry advances our understanding of how a protein, TDP-43, impacts gene expression in neurodegenerative diseases like ALS. The researchers altered levels of TDP-43 in fruit flies to directly compare too much versus too little of the protein. Using massively parallel sequencing, they found that loss of TDP-43 results in widespread gene activation and altered splicing. Over expression resulted in decreased gene expression–a finding contrary to … Read More

Mark Slifka, Ph.D., pioneers new approach in vaccine development

Researchers at the Oregon National Primate Research Center have created a new vaccine development technique using a solution previously thought too damaging to be useful in vaccine production. Mark Slifka, Ph.D., and colleagues have successfully utilized hydrogen peroxide as a virus inactivator in the generation of three distinct vaccines. Vaccines for West Nile, Lymphocytic choriomeningitis, and vaccinia viruses have been created using this new technique, which supports the researchers’ claims that this could truly be a new platform technology … Read More

Knight study on multiple myeloma supports new standard of treatment

A new study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, found that 63 percent of multiple myeloma patients have a reduced risk of disease progression or death if treated with lenalidomide (Revlimid®) following a stem cell transplant. The study was co-authored by Richard Mariarz, MD, medical director of the Adult Stem Cell Transplantation Program & Center for Hematologic Malignancies at the Knight Cancer Institute. Read the OHSU News Release to learn more.

OHSU researchers recognized for highly cited publications

Two OHSU researchers, Fay Horak, Ph.D., professor of neurology, and Robert Peterka, Ph.D., associate professor of biomedical engineering, were recently recognized by the American Physiological Society for having highly cited publications in the Journal of Neurophysiology. Dr. Horak’s paper, “Central programming of postural movements: Adaptation to altered support-surface configurations,” was one of the top ten cited papers from 1980-1989, and Dr. Peterka’s, “Sensorimotor integration in human postural control,” was one of the top ten from 2000 to 2011. … Read More

OHSU Eye Study: Two medications, similar results, drastically different costs

A recent clinical trial involving researchers from OHSU’s Casey Eye Institute comparing two drugs used to treat age-related macular degeneration (AMD) has shown that both Lucentis and Acastin are nearly equally as effective despite the fact that Avastin costs a fraction of what Lucentis costs. These findings were published this week in the medical journal Ophthalmology. A single dose of Lucentis costs approximately $2,000 whereas one dose of Avastin is around $50. Both drugs are … Read More

OHSU researchers: Do pacifiers really decrease breastfeeding rates?

In 2011, OHSU’s Mother-Baby Unit stopped routine distribution of pacifiers to breastfeeding newborns in accordance with recommendations by the Joint Commission and the American Academy of Pediatrics. Their goal was to increase the number of infants in the unit who were breastfed only and received no supplemental formula. What happened, though, was quite the opposite. When the no-pacifier policy was implemented, the percent of exclusively breastfed infants dropped from 79 to 68 percent. During the … Read More

Mental health professionals may be prescribing drugs based on biased publications

According to a study by lead author Erick Turner, M.D., assistant professor of psychiatry and pharmacology, physicians who prescribe antipsychotic medications may be doing so based on incomplete information. Dr. Turner and his colleagues found that while overall, antipsychotic medications appear to be more effective than placebos in clinical trials, sometimes the results of these studies are not published, or articles are written in such a way that overstates a drug’s effectiveness. For example, there … Read More

OHSU researchers discover role of glial cells in regulating neuron development

OHSU researchers Jessica Martin, Ph.D., Alexandra Brown, and Agnieszka Balkowiec, M.D., Ph.D., principal investigator and associate professor of integrative biosciences in the School of Dentistry, have discovered the importance of glial cells in regulating the growth of brainstem neurons. Until now, glial cells had been thought to play a peripheral role in regulating the neurons that control blood pressure and breathing. This new research, published in Neuroscience, shows that glial cells actually play a significant … Read More

Welcome to the Research News Blog

Welcome to the Research News Blog

OHSU Research News is your portal to information about all things research at Oregon Health & Science University. Visit often for updates on events, discoveries, and important funding information.

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