Discoveries

Hessell and ONPRC team discovers antibody treatment that halts SHIV infection in infant macaques

This post has been updated with proper author attribution. OHSU researchers at the Oregon National Primate Research Center have shown that early short-term treatment with human anti-HIV1-1 monoclonal antibodies halts simian HIV infection, a chimeric virus that shares key properties with HIV,  in infant macaques. The study, published March 21 in Nature Medicine, shows that antibodies given to a baby macaque within 24 hours after being exposed to simian HIV can clear the virus completely, … Read More

TTBD Innovator Spotlight: Xiangshu Xiao, PhD

Xiangshu Xiao, Ph.D., associate professor of physiology and pharmacology in OHSU’s School of Medicine, has been at the forefront in the field of cancer chemical biology. The goal of his research is to develop novel cancer therapeutics, using a combination of chemistry and biology, to create new compounds that target deregulated proteins in cancer cells. In his two main cancer-related projects, Dr. Xiao has developed first-in-class compounds that show significant anti-cancer effects in various preclinical … Read More

Researchers discover dopamine modulates sensory hair cell activity

Sound and head movements are sensed by the inner ear, which conveys the signals to the brain, where they are processed and relevant information is sorted out. The brain also signals back to the ear and can influence its activity. For example, if a person is exposed to continuous loud noise, then the auditory system adapts. Generally, the same signaling molecules that mediate communication among neurons in the brain are also used for signaling to the … Read More

Institute of Medicine finds mitochondrial replacement therapy is ethical

In findings released February 3, an  Institute of Medicine panel has deemed mitochondrial transfer therapy ethical. This has important implications for the basic research of OHSU’s Shoukhrat Mitalipov and colleagues in the Center for Embryonic and Gene Therapy, though a Congressional ban on researching this therapy in humans remains in effect. Update: The IOM panel’s report has garnered major media interest–for example, see more here, here, here, and here.

Hope for patients suffering from vision loss due to glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy

New findings from OHSU’s von Gersdorff lab shed light on the underlying mechanism of progressive vision loss caused by diseases such as glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. In a paper published on Jan. 21, in the journal Neuron, the team led by postdoctoral researcher Mean-Hwan Kim, Ph.D., details their discovery of a new synaptic mechanism that uses the eye’s inhibitory neurons to block toxic excitability occurring in the retina of those suffering from glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. This discovery suggests the … Read More

Doernbecher scientists define first link between lead exposure and ADHD

Researchers at OHSU Doernbecher Children’s Hospital have defined for the first time a causal link between blood lead exposure and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in humans. While previous studies have associated lead blood levels with ADHD, research published in Psychological Science is the first to confirm previous hypotheses that exposure to lead in miniscule amounts typical in the U.S., or less than 10 parts per billion, increases symptoms in some individuals with ADHD. The paper … Read More

OHSU study sheds light on risks of giving birth in and out of a hospital setting

The out-of-hospital birth rate in Oregon is the highest of any state (4%) and nationally, more and more women are choosing to give birth at home. This national trend has drawn increased attention to an ongoing debate over whether it’s safe to give birth in an out-of-hospital setting. A new study published the Dec. 31 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine by OHSU researchers provides detailed answers to shed light on the issue. The … Read More

OHSU researchers find cognitive dysfunction resulting from obesity, diabetes can be treated

Brief Reduction in Dietary Fat Improves Cognitive Dysfunction in Mice with Obesity and Type II Diabetes OHSU researchers, led by Jacob Raber, Ph.D., have discovered that the cognitive dysfunction that that often results from obesity and type II diabetes can be treated.  The study reveals that even a brief reduction in dietary fat content in mice that are fed a high-fat diet for a substantial period of time led to a complete rescue of cognitive function. … Read More

Hope for MS patients through understanding roots of the disease in monkeys

New research led by Scott W. Wong, Ph.D., senior scientist, Vaccine and Gene Therapy Institute; interim division chief, Division of Pathobiology and Immunology at the Oregon National Primate Research Center; and professor, OHSU’s Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, describes the similarities between multiple sclerosis and a unique, spontaneous paralytic disease that occurs in nonhuman primates. This model opens the door to discovering the mechanisms driving MS in humans. The model, called Japanese macaque encephalomyelitis, … Read More

Researchers discover a network of genes that control when puberty begins

Researchers at OHSU and the University of Pittsburgh have identified members of an elaborate superfamily of genes that regulate the timing of puberty in highly evolved nonhuman primates. The Zinc finger, or ZNF, gene family comprises approximately 800 individual genes. A handful of genes in this network serve as a “neurobiological brake” that delay the activation of hypothalamic genes responsible for launching puberty until the end of childhood, thereby preventing the premature awakening of the process. The … Read More

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Welcome to the Research News Blog

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