Archive for 2015

OHSU study sheds light on risks of giving birth in and out of a hospital setting

The out-of-hospital birth rate in Oregon is the highest of any state (4%) and nationally, more and more women are choosing to give birth at home. This national trend has drawn increased attention to an ongoing debate over whether it’s safe to give birth in an out-of-hospital setting. A new study published the Dec. 31 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine by OHSU researchers provides detailed answers to shed light on the issue. The … Read More

OHSU researchers find cognitive dysfunction resulting from obesity, diabetes can be treated

Brief Reduction in Dietary Fat Improves Cognitive Dysfunction in Mice with Obesity and Type II Diabetes OHSU researchers, led by Jacob Raber, Ph.D., have discovered that the cognitive dysfunction that that often results from obesity and type II diabetes can be treated.  The study reveals that even a brief reduction in dietary fat content in mice that are fed a high-fat diet for a substantial period of time led to a complete rescue of cognitive function. … Read More

Hope for MS patients through understanding roots of the disease in monkeys

New research led by Scott W. Wong, Ph.D., senior scientist, Vaccine and Gene Therapy Institute; interim division chief, Division of Pathobiology and Immunology at the Oregon National Primate Research Center; and professor, OHSU’s Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, describes the similarities between multiple sclerosis and a unique, spontaneous paralytic disease that occurs in nonhuman primates. This model opens the door to discovering the mechanisms driving MS in humans. The model, called Japanese macaque encephalomyelitis, … Read More

OHSU startup receives $11.45 million to help treat neurologic disorders

NeuroVia, Inc., an OHSU startup company, recently closed Series A equity financing, raising $11.45 million to support the company’s mission and commitment to developing therapeutics for the treatment of neurological disorders. Thomas Scanlan, Ph.D., professor of physiology and pharmacology and director of the OHSU program in chemical biology, is the founder of NeuroVia. Novartis Venture Fund, Sanofi-Genzyme Bioventures, and BioMed Realty Ventures participated in the Series A financing. NeuroVia is committed to addressing unmet medical … Read More

Training Opportunity for Responsible Conduct of Research

Are you participating in an NIH training grant award or fellowship? Do you need RCR training? The Oregon Clinical and Translational Research Institute (OCTRI) is offering an 8-hour seminar that meets RCR requirements for Ks, Ts, and other career development or individual fellowship grants. This seminar is an interactive and practical experience  focused on addressing real issues that have arisen in the course of your research. These may be related to ethics, integrity, or regulatory … Read More

Clarifications on new NIH requirement to consider sex as a biological variable

This past summer, we reported on a new NIH policy that goes into effect Jan. 25, 2016, requiring a deliberate approach to the consideration of sex as a biological variable (SAVB) in pre-clinical research. In a Dec. 11 Open Mike blog post, Deputy Director for Extramural Research Michael Lauer, Ph.D., clarified the application and review process and provided additional information on the origins of the policy. A current high-priority focus at NIH is improved rigor and transparency in federally … Read More

Researchers discover a network of genes that control when puberty begins

Researchers at OHSU and the University of Pittsburgh have identified members of an elaborate superfamily of genes that regulate the timing of puberty in highly evolved nonhuman primates. The Zinc finger, or ZNF, gene family comprises approximately 800 individual genes. A handful of genes in this network serve as a “neurobiological brake” that delay the activation of hypothalamic genes responsible for launching puberty until the end of childhood, thereby preventing the premature awakening of the process. The … Read More

NIH up for budget increase, releases strategic plan

NIH to receive $2 billion budget increase A massive federal spending bill released on Dec. 16 provides the National Institutes of Health with a $2 billion funding increase, the agency’s first raise in more than 12 years. The bill was passed on Dec. 18. The bill provides the following for medical and healthcare-related research: $200 million to the Obama administration’s Precision Medicine Initiative $350 million increase for Alzheimer’s disease research $85 million increase for the BRAIN Initiative … Read More

The call to modernize graduate education

In a Nov. 30, Feedback Loop Blog post, National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) leadership detailed the need to modernize how graduate students in biomedical research are educated and trained. Drs. Shiva Singh, Alison Gammie, and Director Dr. Jon Lorsch announced efforts NIGMS is undertaking to catalyze an education system that has remained virtually unchanged in 30 years, even as science has evolved at an unprecedented rate. The authors make the case that the growth … Read More

Collaboration accelerates research for acute myeloid leukemia

Less than 25 percent of patients newly diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) survive beyond five years. The disease causes more than 10,000 deaths a year in the U.S., and treatment options have remained largely unchanged in 30 years. In 2013, OHSU’s Knight Cancer Institute teamed up with The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society to find a path to treatment for this complex form of leukemia. Their research initiative, Beat AML, brought together nine drug companies and … Read More

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