Notice: NIH revises definition of “clinical trial”

The revision is designed to make the distinction between clinical trials and clinical research studies clearer and to enhance the precision of the information NIH collects, tracks, and reports on clinical trials.  It is not intended to expand the scope of the category of clinical trials. No changes have been made to the NIH definition of a “Phase III clinical trial.”

The revised NIH definition of “clinical trial” is:
A research study1  in which one or more human subjects2 are prospectively assigned3 to one or more interventions4 (which may include placebo or other control) to evaluate the effects of those interventions on health-related biomedical or behavioral outcomes.5
  1. See Common Rule definition of research at 45 CFR 46.102(d).
  2. See Common Rule definition of human subject at 45 CFR 46.102(f).
  3. The term “prospectively assigned” refers to a pre-defined process (e.g., randomization) specified in an approved protocol that stipulates the assignment of research subjects (individually or in clusters) to one or more arms (e.g., intervention, placebo, or other control) of a clinical trial.
  4. An intervention is defined as a manipulation of the subject or subject’s environment for the purpose of modifying one or more health-related biomedical or behavioral processes and/or endpoints.  Examples include:  drugs/small molecules/compounds; biologics; devices; procedures (e.g., surgical techniques); delivery systems (e.g., telemedicine, face-to-face interviews); strategies to change health-related behavior (e.g., diet, cognitive therapy, exercise, development of new habits); treatment strategies; prevention strategies; and, diagnostic strategies.
  5. Health-related biomedical or behavioral outcome is defined as the pre-specified goal(s) or condition(s) that reflect the effect of one or more interventions on human subjects’ biomedical or behavioral status or quality of life.  Examples include:  positive or negative changes to physiological or biological parameters (e.g., improvement of lung capacity, gene expression); positive or negative changes to psychological or neurodevelopmental parameters (e.g., mood management intervention for smokers; reading comprehension and /or information retention); positive or negative changes to disease processes; positive or negative changes to health-related behaviors; and, positive or negative changes to quality of life.
The revised definition will replace the current clinical trial definition in relevant extramural and intramural NIH policies, guidance, and instructional materials. It will apply to competing grant applications that are submitted to NIH for the January 25, 2015 due date and subsequent due dates and contracts proposals that are submitted to NIH on or after January 25, 2015.
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