Posts Tagged ‘OHSU Doernbecher Children’s Hospital’

Growing up at their own pace

This article was written by Carin Moonin and originally appeared in the Portland Monthly 2016 Kids’ Health Annual magazine. All kids aren’t on the same schedule – and that’s just fine. Puberty isn’t an easy time for anyone. And if a child is small or tall for his or her age, then it can be even more difficult. But when should parents be concerned about their child’s growth spurt – or lack thereof? If your child … Read More

‘Grass Strong:’ Andy’s Doernbecher story

In December 2014, a sneaker wave hit 10-year-old Andy Grass and his brothers while visiting Rockaway Beach, Ore. The boys jumped on a log to avoid the sneaker wave, but Andy fell and the log rolled on top of him, resulting in multiple serious injuries. Below, Andy’s dad, Paul, shares how Andy’s hospitalization and prolonged recovery affected their family – and how it continues to teach all of them strength, resilience and healing. *** Our … Read More

Laundry detergent packets: convenient or catastrophic?

If I could describe the emotion in one word surrounding my first pediatric ingestion admission, it would be fear. On all levels. We were admitting a 3-year-old male after he accidentally ingested a laundry detergent packet. There was fear of the complications, but most notable, there was fear of the unknown. The toxic effects of laundry packet ingestions at that time were minimally understood. This was a new phenomenon. And as a newly minted resident, … Read More

The force is strong with this one: Justin’s Doernbecher story

Earlier this year, OHSU Doernbecher Children’s Hospital patients, family and employees were treated to a special visit from Star Wars characters from the Cloud City Garrison thanks to the hard work of 14-year-old Doernbecher patient Justin. Below, Justin’s mom, Joanna, shares her son’s story and why this project meant so much to their family. *** When he was only 3 years old, Justin was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. We had been noticing that he … Read More

Let’s talk about gender

This article was written by Katie Vaughan and illustrated by Sol Linero. It originally appeared in the Portland Monthly 2016 Kids’ Health Annual magazine.  When kids are bombarded with messages about how girls and boys should act, families can help cut through the noise with a conversation. With gender in the headlines – toy aisles ditching their pink and blue labels, the shocking pay gap for our Women’s World Cup champions, the evolution of Caitlyn Jenner … Read More

Under pressure: For kids with hypertension, the time to make changes is now

This article was written by Megan Haverman and originally appeared in the Portland Monthly 2016 Kids’ Health Annual magazine. While in the past high blood pressure in children has usually been considered a secondary symptom of something else, like kidney or heart disease, today children, like adults, are increasingly experiencing issues associated with being overweight. According to Jennifer Huang, M.D., a pediatric cardiologist at OHSU Doernbecher Children’s Hospital, “It’s becoming more and more common for … Read More

Is rice cereal safe for your child?

A study conducted by researchers at Dartmouth published in JAMA Pediatrics found that infants who consume increased amounts of rice cereals and foods containing rice have higher levels of urinary arsenic. Arsenic exposure is associated with an increased risk of neurocognitive problems in children. In light of these recent findings, what are parents to think? The FDA has just proposed new guidelines on the allowable amounts of arsenic in rice cereal that is parallel to … Read More

Hemangiomas: What parents need to know

As their infant grows and matures, many parents will experience and express concern about birthmarks. Up to 20 percent of Caucasian babies will have vascular birthmarks. The most common type is the infantile hemangioma, also known as “strawberry hemangioma.” Hemangiomas are benign vascular proliferations that tend to appear in the infant’s first week of life as a faint red stain or patch. Over the next several weeks to months, the hemangioma undergoes a rapid proliferation … Read More

What you need to know about Zika virus

Medical and public interest has focused on Zika virus and its effects on the unborn babies of pregnant women. Zika virus is spread by mosquitoes; this virus has been detected in countries in Central America, South America, the Caribbean and Mexico. Zika virus usually causes mild disease (fever, rash, pink eye, joint pains) and goes away without the person needing much medical attention. However, there may be a relationship between pregnant women having Zika virus … Read More

The real scoop on teething and sleep

The Dr. Super Sleep Series is written in collaboration with KinderCare. KinderCare believes that early childhood education creates brighter futures. They are the largest provider of early childhood education in the nation and they are passionate about creating a world of learning, joy and adventure for more than 169,000 children every day. For more parenting resources, crafts, learning activities and family fun, visit their blog. What’s the deal with teething and sleep difficulties? That’s the … Read More

Doernbecher Best in the Country U.S. News & World Report

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