Safety

What a summer we’ve had!

August 9th was a festive day here at the Oregon Institute of Occupational Health Sciences. In a room abuzz with nervous excitement, our summer interns stood by their posters, proud to share their summer’s work with Institute staff, friends, and family – all just as excited. Beginning in 1993 and currently directed by Dr. Ryan Olson, the annual Summer Internship Program is an opportunity for students to be mentored by Institute members conducting research in the … Read More

Tell us what you think!

Construction workers, homecare workers and young workers all have high rates of preventable injuries and illnesses. The Oregon Healthy Workforce Center (OHWC) has developed Total Worker Health® toolkits to improve occupational safety, health, and well-being. These toolkits aim to cultivate effective supervision and educate workers on safety practices and healthy habits. Our next step is to disseminate our evidence-based resources. We have created one-page infographics corresponding to each of the four toolkits, SHIP, PUSH, Be … Read More

Paying attention: Using “lessons learned” to be safer

How often do we learn about an accident or near miss, only to recognize that the same incident occurred recently during the same or similar operation? What are our excuses? We are busy. We aren’t paying attention. We have too few people doing the job of too many. We are sleepy. We didn’t think it could happen again. Or…we don’t even realize it because we aren’t tracking what is happening and making the changes necessary … Read More

New OR-FACE toolbox talk guides published

Maintaining an injury prevention culture requires many components, and safety communication is fundamental to that goal. Safety communication can be implemented in a number of ways, including warning labels, safety training and meetings, hazard alerts, and informal, routine communications among supervisors, workers, and co-workers. In OR-FACE’s experience, increasing the level of interaction between supervisors and workers can have a positive influence on safe behaviors. Further, when the interaction is based on actual, relatable events, that … Read More

Making a difference on sleep apnea

Here is a story we think you need to see: Lives are being changed by sharing health and safety messages supported by Oregon Institute of Occupational Health Sciences research. During lunch at the 2013 Spring Symposium, I asked Dr. Steven Shea, the institute’s director, how best to persuade SAIF’s Agricultural Safety Seminar attendees to seek treatment for sleep apnea. From his work on sleep disorders, Steve suggested they self-diagnose by seeing if they have four … Read More

Fall hazard training offered in Spanish

We know that falls are the number one cause of injury and death in construction. Perhaps less known, however, is the disproportionate rate of work-related injuries and illnesses that occurs among Latino construction workers. A study by CPWR found that a combination of language barriers, a lack of Spanish language resources, and lack of culturally appropriate Spanish language training contribute to a 30% greater injury and illness rate than that of their fellow construction workers. … Read More

Symposium recordings have been posted

For those of you who either missed or would like to revisit the talks given at our recent symposium, “Creating a Positive Work Environment for Safety and Health”, webinar recordings are now available here. Enjoy!

Safety as a practice, not just a motto

The last two weeks have been filled with events and initiatives supporting workplace safety and health. We acknowledge all of the organizations, owners, safety and health professionals, and workers who dedicated time and energy to renew their efforts to provide all workers safe and healthy workplaces. We honor: SafeBuild Alliance and the support of the construction community for their sponsorship of the kickoff to Safety Week at the Oregon Forestry Center, and metro-wide proclamations within … Read More

Worker Memorial Day 2017

National Safety Stand-Down May 8-12, 2017

Falls continue to be the leading cause of death in construction. Between 2003-2013 OSHA reported more than 3,500 deaths resulting from construction falls. In 2015 alone there were 350 fatal falls, out of 937 total construction fatalities. All those deaths were preventable. In response to the overwhelming number of fall-related injuries and fatalities, the Construction Fall Prevention campaign was launched in 2012 by a partnership including OSHA, NIOSH, CPWR, and the NORA Construction Sector Council. … Read More

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