On the Road Again for the Holidays?

Part of that work life balance we all strive to achieve means meeting family and friends, and that often requires time traveling. Sitting at times other than work isn’t good for you either. Here are some tips from the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) for staying active when traveling.

Aerobics at the Airport
More and more airports are also getting in on the fitness trend. Some have gone beyond your own making laps around the terminal. For example, The Phoenix Airport offers a 2-mile walking path with views of mountain peaks and Boston’s Logan Airport has a walking path with health checkpoints where you can check your height, weight, blood pressure, and BMI. Download Gate Guru to identify what your airport offers.

Even when you are confined at the gate or on a train, you can exercise. The AICR has a video at http://vimeo.com/34580370, and the Centers for Disease Control also shows and describes a workout for a small spaces.

Rest Stops Where You Can Workout
Apps like USA Rest Stops has information about rest stops, but many state transportation departments highlight the locations and features of each rest area. Look for rest stops with a pet-friendly or picnic table icon – these are more likely to have green areas where you can take a brisk 5- or 10-minute walk before getting back in your car. See the link to rest stops in  Oregon, Washington and California.

Submitted by Diane Elliott, MD, (OHWC Internal Steering Committee Chair)

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Comments

  1. ‘Part of that work life balance we all strive to achieve means meeting family and friends, and that often requires time traveling.’

    I totally agree. To time travel I employ a Tardis instead of heading off to a crowded airport.

    The Doctor

About the Author

Dede supports the Oregon Institute of Occupational Health Sciences and the Oregon Healthy WorkForce Center's research, engagement and education programs. She is a certified industrial hygienist.

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