Pedestrians and Bicyclists: Staying safe as we become fit

We always seek feedback from our stakeholders while exhibiting at events. Last week’s Northwest Agriculture Show was no exception. One of the more emotional requests to us as a way to make a difference in safety was a plea to encourage pedestrians and cyclists to become more visible to motorists in the dark.

Here in Portland and in many of our neighboring cities, we pride ourselves on how many of us get exercise during our commute, or perhaps before or after work hours. However, many of us while walking, running and cycling really don’t realize how vulnerable we are in the dark. Perhaps sometimes we think that since we can so clearly see a vehicle with lights, the reverse must be true.  And while we are rightly infuriated as another car drives through an occupied crosswalk we do need to be proactive in working to be more visible.

So whether our co-workers and employees are on the streets on the way to or from work, before or after work or during work – one bad accident and it’s all the same. They likely won’t be at work tomorrow, and they and their loved ones will suffer a lot of emotional and financial pain. In a simple way, Total Worker Health™ means making sure we are considering safety while we tackle health. Is your organization including tips for safe exercise and commuting?

Here’s a few resources:
What you need to know about Oregon’s crosswalk laws
Safer Journey – Interactive Pedestrian Safety Awareness
Pedestrian Safety Workshop: A Focus on Older Adults

Pedestrian Safety Campaign
A Guide to Lights on Your Bike – How to See and Be Seen
Unsafe Crosswalk – a YouTube video

 

 

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About the Author

Dede supports the Oregon Institute of Occupational Health Sciences and the Oregon Healthy WorkForce Center's research, engagement and education programs. She is a certified industrial hygienist.

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