survivorship

Unmasking the cost of cancer drug development

Cancer drug R&D spending may be a fraction of the estimate cited by the biopharmaceutical industry.     The average price of anticancer drugs has been rising by about 10 percent annually in recent years, with annual costs for a single drug now routinely running to $100,000 or more. The burden is falling hard on people with cancer. In one study, 34 percent of survivors went into debt (and 9 percent who went into debt … Read More

Surviving sarcoma: a free educational conference for patients, families

Sarcoma patients and their families are invited to participate in an interactive panel discussion and have their questions answered by OHSU physicians and surgeons who focus on the cancer, which is rare in adults but accounts for about 20 of all childhood cancers.

Nerve damage from chemotherapy may persist for years, worsening risk of falls

(Getty Images) In a study that kept in touch with more than 500 women cancer survivors for an average of six years, nearly half continued to experience chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy and a heightened risk of falling. The study, published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, challenges the widely held assumption that chemotherapy-induced neuropathy will mostly cause no serious long-term effects. “Many cancer survivors are told these chemo-related symptoms will eventually go away. Our study found that’s … Read More

Widely used prostate cancer treatment may worsen risk of falls

Men with prostate cancer became more vulnerable to falls if they used androgen deprivation therapy, and the heightened risk of falling persisted for more than a year after ending therapy, a study has revealed.

Oregon’s Death with Dignity Act, 20 years later

In 1997, Oregon became the first state to make it legal for terminally ill patients to self-administer a prescription to hasten death. A review of 991 cases of lethal self-medication through 2015 shows that the law’s impact has remained largely predictable. Three-fourths of the people were dying of cancer, nearly all were white and around 70 percent had attended college. More than 90 percent had health insurance, were receiving hospice care and died at home. … Read More

Lessons from Oregon about end-of-life care

At the end of life, people in Oregon are more likely to have their care wishes honored, less likely to be hospitalized and more likely to use home hospice services compared with people in Washington and the rest of the U.S.

When it’s time to stop a lifesaving cancer drug to find out if you are cured

The depth of remission achieved with the targeted therapy imatinib (Gleevec) raises a tough new question for some leukemia patients: is it ever safe to stop taking the breakthrough drug developed at OHSU?

The ‘Cancer translated’ blog top ten posts of 2016

The OHSU Knight Cancer Institute’s “Cancer translated” blog explores new findings, ideas and debates in cancer medicine, from basic biology, to clinical trials, to prevention, survivorship and patient advocacy. We sorted a year’s worth of posts to find the most heavily trafficked reports. Here’s the top 10 in order of popularity:

Video series tells the story of OHSU’s new home for healing

McKenna, an incredibly optimistic 11-year-old, has had 16 surgeries and continues to cope with the after-effects of brain cancer. Sarah’s doctors have called her recovery from aggressive brain cancer a miracle. Carolyn, a multiple myeloma patient, and her husband Dennis had to leave their home in Bend for nearly two months for her to receive treatment. Their stories convey what it means to have a home for healing during times of crisis. They are told … Read More

Marquam Hill Lecture: Confronting the unexpected rise of pancreas cancer

Unlike the other major causes of cancer mortality, pancreatic cancer is increasing in both incidence and number of deaths each year. Despite improvements in early detection and therapy that have greatly improved outcomes in other cancers, the five-year survival rate remains less than 8 percent for people diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. It’s on a course to become the second largest cause of cancer death within five to ten years – ahead of colorectal, breast, prostate … Read More

Targeting leukemia with drug combinations

Targeting leukemia with drug combinations

Cancer researchers have devised a way to rapidly screen combinations of drugs to identify pairs of agents most likely to work synergistically against some of the most difficult to treat forms of leukemia.