Research

Men’s Health: 3 reminders for maintaining a healthy mind

National Men’s Health Week is observed each year leading up to Father’s Day. Help support the men in your life with these three tips for better mental health. 1. Depression affects everyone. Men and women, older adults and young adolescents, all types of people can be affected by this “poisonous fogbank” which is how the author William Styron described depression. But men may be inclined to falsely think they don’t (or shouldn’t) get depression. Major … Read More

Nothing great is ever achieved without enthusiasm

NW Noggin, the brain-child of Bill Griesar and Jeff Leake, is an arts-and-science integrated outreach program that targets underserved communities in the Portland-metropolitan area. Teams of artists and scientists from universities all over the Portland/Vancouver area collaborate to create art-based science projects that illustrate complex concepts in ways that non-experts can understand. Recently, NW Noggin was invited to travel to DC to participate in “Briefing with Brains,” a week-long series of events aimed to inform … Read More

Two ears are not always better than one

My team of researchers has discovered that as many as one in two individuals with hearing loss experience abnormal fusion, or a blending of dissimilar sounds, when wearing either bilateral hearing aids or a cochlear implant with a hearing aid. This “averaging” of sounds worsens their ability to hear others’ speech. Typically, two hearing devices, when possible, are better than one. But some individuals with bilateral hearing loss hear speech better when using a hearing aid … Read More

Help us understand how to better design health technologies

Currently, there are many claims and promises of how electronic medical records, fitness bands, smartphone apps, telemedicine and many related technologies will become mainstay components of healthcare. Yet despite this promise, there is a dramatic lack of knowledge of how such innovations are or may be used among the diverse members of our community. Most importantly, we don’t know when, where, or even whether they may work. Please consider joining us as a research volunteer in a … Read More

Is there a connection between stress and Parkinson’s disease?

Most neurology text books will state that stress seems to exacerbate Parkinson’s disease symptoms and persons with Parkinson’s disease often describe the worsening of their tremor when having to speak publicly or the worsening of dyskinesias while watching a suspenseful movie scene. In spite of this observation there has not been a lot of research really examining the interplay of stress and the development or exacerbation of Parkinson’s. We know that stress can have effects … Read More

Men suffering from depression who have social support less likely to seek mental health treatment

Researchers, led by Alan Teo, M.D., assistant professor of psychiatry at OHSU, and researcher at the VA Portland Health Care System, sought to determine whether support from a loved one encourages people experiencing depression to seek treatment from a health provider or whether that support, by serving as informal treatment, inadvertently discourages people from seeking mental health services. Their findings show that men experiencing moderate or severe depression who had social support from family or … Read More

Diabetes drug may prevent recurring strokes and heart attacks

The OHSU Stroke Center was an integral part of an NIH-funded global study that has shown that a diabetes drug may prevent a second stroke or heart attack in patients with insulin resistance. The study was conducted at 167 institutions in seven countries, with the Oregon Stroke Center enrolling the second highest number of participants across the globe. Wayne Clark, M.D. was a co-author of the paper. The following press release was originally published by the NIH on February 17, 2016: NIH-funded … Read More

Special delivery: Discovery of viral receptor bodes better gene therapy

There is much hope for gene therapy’s future potential to treat a number of human diseases. The use of adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors to transport genetic material into cells has been critical to the initial success of experimental gene therapy treatments of hereditary diseases, including hemophilia B.  But in order to develop gene therapy cures for additional diseases and conditions, like diabetes and heart disease, it will be necessary to deliver the treatment to specific tissues. Achieving … Read More

Study hopes to clarify the link between sleep problems and Alzheimer’s disease

An upcoming study led by Jeffrey Iliff, Ph.D. and Bill Rooney, Ph.D. hopes to clearly determine the relationship between a lack of sleep and Alzheimer’s disease. The team received funding from the Paul G. Allen Foundation to test their approach. They hope to begin scanning the brains of participants within a year, using a 7-Tesla MRI (pictured below). Iliff and Rooney recently spoke to Jon Hamilton at NPR’s Morning Edition about the upcoming study and the importance of adequate sleep. Listen to … Read More

Year in review: The most popular “On the Brain” posts of 2015

As we welcome in the new year, here’s a look back at the brain-related news you may have missed; a round-up of our most read blog posts of 2015: 1. Acupuncture and diet changes to treat neuropathic pain Peripheral Neuropathy is a common neurologic condition, which affects the peripheral nerves. The most common symptoms associated with peripheral neuropathy are burning, tingling pain, which often feels like sharp electric sensation. More… 2. Dietary and lifestyle modifications for migraine … Read More

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