Early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease is key goal for OHSU researchers

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia and is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Symptoms include memory loss, personality changes and trouble thinking, and the disease typically worsens over time. Current treatments cannot stop the disease from progressing, but they can slow the development of symptoms temporarily. Clinical diagnosis is determined by noting the degree of a patient’s mental decline, which is not obvious until there is severe … Read More

A look back at a neuroscience meeting of the minds in the Pacific Northwest

A Congressman, a National Institutes of Health (NIH) director, a leader of a national advocacy group, and a scientist-turned-advocate shared a stage last month in Portland, OR, to talk about the importance and impact of neuroscience research nationwide. This Neuroscience Town Hall was the final event of the NeuroFutures conference, organized and sponsored by the OHSU Brain Institute, the University of Washington, and the Allen Institute for Brain Science, which brought together scientists and clinicians in … Read More

Research affirms use of thrombectomy procedure for stroke treatment

Stroke is the fifth leading cause of death in America and a leading cause of adult disability, according to the National Stroke Association. For patients who experience strokes and the physicians who treat them, time is brain. A mechanical thrombectomy is a groundbreaking stroke treatment that our doctors use to return patients to full function at an astonishing speed – often within a matter of hours of having a stroke. Because this procedure can remove the … Read More

NeuroFutures 2015: Neuroscience innovation in the Pacific Northwest

Last month, scientists and clinicians in the Pacific Northwest spent three days sharing new discoveries, igniting collaborations, and discussing the future of neuroscience research at the NeuroFutures meeting in Portland. Stimulating research talks covered advances in clinical technologies, such as deep brain stimulation for depression, retinal prosthetics, and advanced MRI imaging to study myelination, sleep, and ADHD, as well as basic science discoveries that are the building blocks for how we understand the cellular basis … Read More

Three questions for Sean Speese

Sean Speese, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor at the OHSU Jungers Center for Neurosciences Research. His career has spanned 17 years of research in invertebrate model systems.  What questions are you trying to answer in your work? Our main overarching goal is to understand how cells regulate expression of specific genes in time and space. For example, neurons in our brains are quite large, highly arborized and can span long distances. However, these cells are tasked … Read More

Three questions with memory expert Matt Lattal

Matt Lattal, Ph.D., is an associate professor of behavioral neuroscience in the OHSU School of Medicine and faculty member in the Neuroscience Graduate Program.  What projects are you currently working on how do you collaborate with fellow faculty members?  Work in my lab is focused on two very broad questions: How do memories form? And once they are formed, how can they be eliminated or inhibited? We know a lot about the behavioral conditions and cellular and molecular processes … Read More

Meet Peter Steyger: The man behind breakthrough research into hearing loss

As a child, Peter Steyger, Ph.D. was cured of meningitis, but the drug that saved him also caused his hearing loss. Now a neuroscience researcher, Dr. Steyger recently found that patients stricken with dangerous bacterial infections are at greater risk of hearing loss than previously recognized. We sat down with Dr. Steyger to learn some more about his research and what comes next. That’s a great photo of you and your mom with your speech therapist. Can … Read More

Healthy aging and preserving community memories

The Layton Aging and Alzheimer’s Disease Center in partnership with the Center for Healthy Communities is launching a first-of-its kind study around brain health intervention. The innovative program aims to boost cognitive health within the African-American community in Portland. The Sharing History through Active Reminiscence and Photo-imagery (SHARP) study asks African Americans who are 55 or older to engage in community memory building while walking through historically black neighborhoods in North and Northeast Portland. Participants … Read More

The White House BRAIN Initiative in Oregon

Just over two years ago, President Obama made a dedication to support and enhance neuroscience research through the Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies, or BRAIN, Initiative. The ultimate goal, a comprehensive map of the human brain under normal conditions and in various disease states, is a daunting and perhaps unattainable task. However, a year after the announcement, tangible goals and measurable outcomes were further defined by a Working Group of scientists, and we are … Read More

Meet Tianyi Mao: Looking at brain circuits in a new light

The Brain Research Awareness and Information Network (BRAINet) is the volunteer outreach organization of the OHSU Brain Institute. Each month, they come together for a lecture luncheon. Tianyi Mao, Ph.D. was a recent guest speaker. Our brains are the most sophisticated computing machines on the planet. They are amazingly plastic, yet macroscopically their structures are conserved across individuals within a species. Information, both internal and external, is processed by such stereotypical brain circuits. It flows from one sub-region in … Read More

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