News

Celebrating our ROSE Award winners

We’ve all experienced those magical moments when someone makes your day – by treating you like family, by looking out for your well-being, by making that extra effort that transforms a small act into a big difference. OHSU’s ROSE Award honors these experiences and celebrates the exceptional acts of service excellence that make our workplace a community. We recognize these individuals for providing acts of compassion, dedication, tenacity, generosity, communication, and leadership, among others. The … Read More

A strong neuroscience program is about to get stronger—meet leaders and researchers at the forefront

Today, neuroscience at OHSU is poised for dramatic growth, driven by emerging areas of research strength in the fields of neurodevelopment and neurodegeneration and a planned investment of at least $100 million. Led by long-time campus leaders and new luminaries, the university is doubling down on its quest: contribute in a major way to understanding the mystery between our ears and, above all, improve brain health. Leadership On the faculty since 1982, Dennis Bourdette, M.D., F.A.A.N., chairs neurology in the … Read More

Neuroscience research news you may have missed

Because so many people have neurological disorders, research to prevent, treat or cure them is essential. Here at the OHSU Brain Institute, we bring doctors, laboratory scientists, and neurological experts together to develop advanced treatments and prevention strategies. We’ve compiled a list of just a few of the more recent research innovations coming from our labs: Javits Award – Dr. Mary Heinricher receives $2.3 million Jacob Javits Neuroscience Investigator Award for her research into chronic pain: Portland … Read More

Fatal fits and nods affect us all

A child with intractable seizures is heartbreaking for family, friends and the neurologist who searches for effective therapy. But a child with intractable seizures who lives in dire poverty, who is malnourished, who cannot obtain medications, and who is rejected by government, by school and eventually by a desperate family is utterly devastating to anyone with compassion for humanity. This is precisely the situation today for thousands of children affected by Nodding Syndrome in northern … Read More

Oregon Poison Center experts discuss marijuana with educators from around the nation

The Oregon Poison Center at OHSU recently presented on Oregon’s new marijuana laws from a poison prevention outlook at the North American Congress of Clinical Toxicology 2016 (NACCT). Members of the Oregon Poison Center packed their bags and headed to Boston for this year’s annual toxicology conference. “Marijuana: The Poison Prevention Outlook” was one of the most anticipated sessions for the nation’s poison center educators. In this session, Fiorella Carhuaz, the health educator for the Oregon Poison … Read More

Neurosurgery resident waltzes through joys of ballroom dance

There may be a joke out there somewhere about how ballroom dancing is hardly brain surgery, but Kunal Gupta isn’t likely going to be the person to make it. Instead, Gupta, a native of the United Kingdom, is actually someone with an affinity for and a connection to both brain surgery and ballroom dancing. Now in his fourth of seven years as a neurosurgery resident at Oregon Health & Science University, Gupta, MBChB, PhD, grew … Read More

Study hopes to clarify the link between sleep problems and Alzheimer’s disease

An upcoming study led by Jeffrey Iliff, Ph.D. and Bill Rooney, Ph.D. hopes to clearly determine the relationship between a lack of sleep and Alzheimer’s disease. The team received funding from the Paul G. Allen Foundation to test their approach. They hope to begin scanning the brains of participants within a year, using a 7-Tesla MRI (pictured below). Iliff and Rooney recently spoke to Jon Hamilton at NPR’s Morning Edition about the upcoming study and the importance of adequate sleep. Listen to … Read More

Year in review: The most popular “On the Brain” posts of 2015

As we welcome in the new year, here’s a look back at the brain-related news you may have missed; a round-up of our most read blog posts of 2015: 1. Acupuncture and diet changes to treat neuropathic pain Peripheral Neuropathy is a common neurologic condition, which affects the peripheral nerves. The most common symptoms associated with peripheral neuropathy are burning, tingling pain, which often feels like sharp electric sensation. More… 2. Dietary and lifestyle modifications for migraine … Read More

Miss Oregon an important voice for traumatic brain injury

When I was a freshman in high school, I suffered a traumatic brain injury due to a cheerleading accident. As someone who had no prior knowledge of brain injuries, it was difficult to understand what I was going through and why I felt so different during my recovery process. Because of the adversities I overcame as a result of my traumatic brain injury, I wanted to advocate for this serious and often ignored issue. After … Read More

Valerie Palmer recognized for innovative social-impact contributions

Valerie Palmer, faculty instructor at OHSU, was recently selected by Encore.org as one of 41 Purpose Prize Fellows for her work creating an education exchange, bringing services to immigrant refugees and raising health-care professionals’ cultural awareness and cooperation. Encore.org is a national nonprofit that is building a movement to tap the experience of people in midlife and beyond who are using their encore years – the time of traditional retirement – to undertake powerful social-impact projects. Valerie S. Palmer Faculty Instructor, … Read More